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18 New methods in food analysis

Food chemistry conference in Hamburg

18/20
August 11, 2022

Food quality and consumer protection are the focus of the 50th German Food Chemists' Day, which will take place from September 19th to 21st, 2022 at the University of Hamburg. At the Conference , the Society of Food Chemistry, a Division of the German Chemical Society (GDCh), also celebrates its 75th anniversary. In the lecture program, food chemists will present, among other things, new methods for more sustainable food analysis, for the detection of mechanically separated meat and for the detection of off-flavor notes, for example in cocoa. Scientific poster sessions, a specialist and book exhibition and a public evening lecture by Lars Fischer, the awardee of the GDCh Prize for Journalism and Literature 2022 - round off the Conference . The celebratory meeting will also look back on 75 years of the Society of Food Chemistry .

The scientific program of the annual Food Chemists' Day shows once again what a crucial role food chemistry plays in the everyday lives of consumers. For example, Prof. Dr. Stefan Wittke, Bremerhaven University of Applied Sciences, a new method for detecting machine-separated chicken meat (separator meat) in sausages. With his team, he developed a so-called "targeted" LC-MS/MS analysis, with which even small amounts of intervertebral disc and cartilage-specific proteins from the chicken can be detected. These inevitably end up in the sausage when mechanically separated meat is used. The high specificity of the method also makes further comprehensive (bio)chemical characterization of the sample superfluous.

Together with her team at the Leibniz Institute for Food Systems Biology at the Technical University of Munich, Daniela Füllmann ensures that chocolate tastes good. Off-flavors occasionally occur with raw cocoa, which in the worst case can lead to costly product recalls. When processing raw cocoa into chocolate, the concentration of most of the off-flavours hardly changed. Fulfillment shows how she used molecular sensory methods to identify compounds that lead to smoky-smoky, musty-mouldy, and coconut-like off-flavors. With the results and based on the odor threshold concentrations, she and her team were able to propose limit values in raw cocoa for incoming goods inspection in the chocolate industry. Studies on minimizing the formation of off-flavours in raw cocoa production are in progress.

dr René Bachmann from the Schleswig-Holstein state laboratory will present a new analysis method for more sustainable food analysis at the Conference . The spatially offset Raman spectroscopy is a further development of the conventional Raman spectroscopy and also enables measurement through thicker and colored packaging of different materials. The method is currently used in the pharmaceutical industry to check the authenticity of raw materials as part of quality control without having to open the packaging. Bachmann shows the benefits of Raman spectroscopy for the analysis of food in official food monitoring control and quality control in food processing companies. So far, almost all samples there have had to be examined invasively, which is neither economical nor sustainable. Together with his team, he developed an exemplary measurement and evaluation routine for packaged, raw chicken breast, the results of which he will present in his lecture .

Other exciting topics at the 50th German Food Chemists' Day include a smartphone app for the personalized selection of suitable foods in the event of intolerance and allergies, the fermentation of leftovers from bread and pasta production to create alternative protein sources, as well as aroma analysis and chemocommunication.

Further information on the Conference at www.gdch.de/lchtag2022

With around 30,000 members, the GDCh is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 27 Divisions, including the Society of Food Chemistry, whose task it is to promote the exchange of ideas in the field of food chemistry and its neighboring disciplines and to provide technical suggestions. With around 2700 members, the Society of Food Chemistry is the largest Division in the GDCh.

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17 Claudia Felser receives a Liebig commemorative coin

Solid state chemistry on the border to physics

17/22
20 July 2022

The 132nd meeting and 200th anniversary of the Society of German Natural Scientists and Physicians (GDNÄ) will take place in Leipzig from September 8th to 11th, 2022. Traditionally, the German Chemical Society (GDCh) contributes to the event with a scientific meeting and the awarding of the Liebig commemorative coin . The winner this year is Professor Dr. Claudia Felser from the Max Planck Institute for Chemical physics of Solids, Dresden.

With the Liebig commemorative coin, which is worth 7,500 euros, the GDCh honors outstanding achievements in the entire field of chemistry. Claudia Felser receives the award for her remarkable work in the field of theoretical prediction of physical properties in inorganic solids and their experimental confirmation, which has already led to several important breakthroughs in the chemistry and physics of solids. The physical phenomena she considers, such as superconductivity and thermoelectricity, today (among others) the world of topological insulators, are of particular interest and highly relevant in basic research and applications. Felser's current research interests are in the design, synthesis and physical investigation of new quantum materials, in particular Heusler compounds and topological materials for energy conversion and spintronics.

Claudia Felser studied chemistry and physics at the University of Cologne, where she completed both her diploma in solid state chemistry (1989) and her doctorate in physical chemistry (1994). After postdoctoral stays at the Max Planck Institute in Stuttgart and at the CNRS in Nantes (France), she came to the University of Mainz as an assistant professor in 1996 and was appointed full professor there in 2003. She is currently Director at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical physics of Solids in Dresden. In 2001, Felser received the Order of Merit of the State of Rhineland-Palatinate for founding the first school laboratory "NaT-Lab" at the University of Mainz with the focus on supporting female students in particular. She is a Fellow of the IEEE Magnetic Society, American Physical Society, Institute of Physics, London, CIFAR Canada and the Materials Research Society of India. In 2018 she became a member of the Leopoldina, the National Academy of Sciences, and of acatech, the German Academy of Science and Engineering. She has already received an ERC Advanced Grant twice and numerous other honors.

The award ceremony will take place on September 9th as part of the "Chemistry" session, which will be chaired by GDCh President Dr. Karsten Danielmeier is opened. After the award ceremony, the prizewinner will give a lecture on the subject of "Chirality and Topology". In addition, the GDCh awards two honorary memberships: Dr. Hilde Nimmesgern, Head of the Commission for Equal Opportunities of the GDCh, and Professor Dr. Herbert W. Roesky receive the award for their outstanding Merit for the promotion of chemistry and the goals of the GDCh: This was decided by the GDCh General Assembly in 2021 with a large majority.

With around 30,000 members, the German Chemical Society is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It awards numerous internationally renowned prizes, including the Liebig commemorative coin, which was first awarded in 1903. Among the honorees are numerous later Nobel Prize winners: Adolf von Baeyer, Paul Ehrlich, Fritz Haber, Carl Bosch, Max Planck, Friedrich Bergius, Hans Fischer, Feodor Lynen, Karl Ziegler and Gerhard Ertl.

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Prof. Dr. Claudia Felser (Foto: Sven Döring / laif)

16 Excellent Organic Chemistry

ORCHEM 2022 with a top-class lecture program and numerous award ceremonies

16/22
July 14, 2022

The 22nd ORCHEM will take place at the Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster from September 5th to 7th. Due to the wide range of topics and the renowned speakers from scientists from research and industry, the Conference is one of the most attractive conferences in the field of organic chemistry. The program includes lectures on synthesis, catalysis, methodology and reactivity. The Conference is organized by the Liebig Association for Organic Chemistry of the German Chemical Society (GDCh). The Emil Fischer Medal, the GDCh Award for Biocatalysis and the ORCHEM Prize are also awarded at ORCHEM.

On September 5th, the GDCh awards the Emil Fischer Medal to Professor Dr. Peter Bäuerle, University of Ulm. Bäuerle receives the award, worth 7,500 euros, for his work in the field of oligothiophenes and other pi systems. With his research, the awardee laid the foundation for organic photovoltaics and thus co-founded an international field of research.

Peter Bäuerle, born in Aichtal-Grötzingen in 1956, studied chemistry at the University of Stuttgart, where he also received his doctorate in organic chemistry in 1985. After a postdoctoral stay at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT), Boston, USA, he researched and habilitated at the University of Stuttgart until 1994. From 1994 to 1996 he was a professor at the University of Würzburg before being appointed to the University of Ulm. There he is still director of the Institute for Organic Chemistry II and New Materials and Head of the service center for mass spectrometry. Bäuerle is a member of the Leopoldina, National Academy of Sciences, and the European Academy of Sciences (EURASC) and has already received numerous awards for his research.

Also on September 5, Dr. Ulrich Markel, University of California, San Diego, USA, received the GDCh Award for Biocatalysis for his dissertation written at the Rheinisch-Westfälische Technische Hochschule (RWTH) Aachen. The award, endowed with 2000 euros, honors outstanding dissertations in the field of biocatalysis and was presented in 2020 by GDCh member Prof. Dr. em Manfred Schneider set up. Markel received the award for his outstanding doctoral thesis in the interdisciplinary field of developing new methods of directed evolution to improve the catalytic properties of natural and artificial metalloenzymes. His work entitled "Directed evolution of decarboxylase OleT and nitrobindin hybrid catalysts" was awarded "summa cum laude" and led to a number of high-ranking publications.

On September 6th, the Liebig Association for Organic Chemistry awards the ORCHEM Prize, which comes with prize money of 2,500 euros, to two young scientists. dr Johannes Broichhagen, Leibniz Research Institute for Molecular Pharmacology Berlin, is honored for the development of new molecular tools to answer important questions in the life sciences. Junior Professor Dr. Max Hansmann, Technical University of Dortmund, receives the award for his fundamental and pioneering work in the field of synthesis and characterization of reactive intermediates and the development of organic redox systems. The ORCHEM Prize is regularly awarded at ORCHEM to young scientists who have qualified through new, original and trend-setting scientific work in the field. After the award ceremony, both awardee give a brief insight into their research.

Further information on the Conference at: www.gdch.de/orchem2022

With around 30,000 members, the German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 27 Divisions, including the Liebig Association for Organic Chemistry with over 1300 members. The main concerns of the Liebig Association for Organic Chemistry are, among other things, to stimulate research directions and research projects in the field of organic chemistry, to inform about essential activities in this field and to make known important and current aspects of organic chemistry through intensive public relations work.

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Prof. Dr. Peter Bäuerle (Foto: privat)

15 Klaus Grohe Prize goes to Raphaël Rodriguez

New therapeutic approaches through interdisciplinary research

15/22
July 12, 2022

dr Raphaël Rodriguez, Institut Curie, Paris, France, is awarded the Klaus Grohe Prize 2022. The EUR 50,000 award is one of the most valuable prizes in Europe for medicinal chemistry and is awarded by the Klaus Grohe Foundation, which is part of the German Chemical Society (GDCh). Rodriguez receives the award for his pioneering work at the interface between chemistry and biology, combining preparative organic synthesis with molecular and cell biology. The award ceremony will take place on September 4th by GDCh board member Dr. Rolf Albach at the International Symposium on Medicinal Chemistry (EFMC-ISMC 2022) in Nice, France.

With his research, Raphael Rodriguez advances both chemistry and the understanding of biology at the molecular level in order to discover new therapeutic approaches. The scientist distinguished himself early in his Career with pioneering contributions to chemical biology and medicinal chemistry and continues to face challenging research questions to which he finds convincing answers. Rodriguez works across disciplines and conducts his research at the highest level in order to apply his findings in drug discovery. For example, he contributed to the development of remodelin, a small molecule that can repair defects in laminopathy cells and improve cellular fitness by reducing endogenous levels of DNA damage. This work led to the identification of the acetyltransferase NAT10 as a drug target of remodelin involved in cellular aging and fitness. In addition, his achievements include the first chemical synthesis of the complex natural product marmycin and the drug ironomycin, which targets iron metabolism. With his research group, he also succeeded in elucidating the mechanism of action of salinomycin against cancer stem cells and identifying the role of iron in maintaining these cells.

Raphael Rodriguez, born in Avignon, FR, in 1978, studied organic chemistry in Avignon and Marseille. He received his PhD in organic chemistry from the University of Oxford, UK, and in Marseille. In 2005 he moved to the University of Cambridge, UK as a postdoctoral researcher, before joining the CNRS (Centre national de la recherche scientifique), Paris, FR, as a group leader in 2012. There he was appointed Research Director at the Institut Curie in 2017. Rodriguez is a Fellow of the Royal Society of Chemistry (FRSC) and has received various awards including the prestigious Tetrahedron Young Investigator Award, Prix Lacassagne (Collège de France) and Grand Prix Charles Defforey (Académie des Sciences). He is a scientific co-founder of several companies including SideROS and Adrestia Therapeutics.

The Klaus Grohe Prize goes to the chemist Prof. Dr. Klaus Grohe (*1934), who developed important innovative medicines with great success during his professional career. In 2001, Klaus and Eva Grohe set up the Klaus Grohe Foundation at the GDCh, which has been awarding the Klaus Grohe Prize for medicinal chemistry to young scientists since 2004. Since a reorientation in 2020, the prize has been endowed with 50,000 euros and is now awarded to internationally renowned researchers in the field of drug development whose work makes an important contribution to application.

With around 30,000 members, the German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. The GDCh manages numerous dependent foundations in trust. The purpose of these foundations is to award prizes, grants and grants. Foundation advisory boards decide on the awarding of prizes, awards and scholarships.

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Dr. Raphaël Rodriguez (Foto: privat)

14 August Wilhelm von Hofmann commemorative medal for the founders of the concept of green chemistry

Award ceremony for Paul Anastas and John Warner in Lisbon

14/22
July 7, 2022

The German Chemical Society (GDCh) honors Professor Dr. Paul T. Anastas and Professor Dr. John C. Warner for her special services to chemistry with the August Wilhelm von Hofmann commemorative medal. The GDCh thus honors the awardee as the founders of the concept of green chemistry, for which they not only laid the scientific and intellectual foundations, but also realized concrete implementations. The award ceremony will take place on September 1st at the 8th EuChemS Chemistry Congress in Lisbon, Portugal.

More than twenty years ago, Paul Anastas and John Warner formulated twelve principles of green chemistry in their book Green Chemistry: Theory and Practice. With a visionary view of chemistry, they founded the field of green chemistry, which is indispensable today, and laid the foundation for sustainable chemical product development. In addition, the awardee were committed to the interdisciplinary integration of green chemistry at universities and actively contributed to the realization in their area and at other locations worldwide. For this exemplary commitment to the services of chemistry, Anastas and Warner now receive the August Wilhelm von Hofmann commemorative medal of the GDCh.

Long ridiculed as a kind of chemical vision for non-chemists and "greens", the principles of green chemistry are more relevant today than ever. The questions of how we can maintain industrial material flows and process chains with regenerative energy sources in the near future or how we have to give up syntheses from fossil resources for ecological reasons are becoming increasingly pressing. Anastas and Warner have shown for the first time how, with a holistic (circular economy) approach, new creative synthesis processes for the production of toxicologically and ecologically less harmful substances can emerge from these complex economic and eco-social contexts. The principles of green chemistry will be of increasing importance in the future, especially in view of the great challenges facing the chemical industry, for example with regard to decarbonization or rigorous regeneration of starting materials in existing material flows.

Apart from their pioneering work in the field of green chemistry, Paul Anastas and John Warner can look back on top-class academic careers with numerous outstanding scientific publications and patents.

Paul T. Anastas, born in 1962 in Quincy, Massachusetts, USA, received his BS in chemistry from the University of Massachusetts, Boston, USA, and his MA and Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry from Brandeis University, Waltham, Massachusetts, USA. He began his Career as a chemist with the United States Environmental Protection Agency (EPA), where he coined the term green chemistry and initiated the first research program in the field. In 1997 he co-founded the Green Chemistry Institute at the American Chemical Society (ACS) and worked in the White House Office of Science and Technology Policy from 1999 to 2004, most recently as Associate Director for Environmental Affairs. Anastas returned to the EPO in 2009 as Assistant Administrator of the EPO's Office of Research and Development (ORD) and Scientific Advisor to the Agency before moving to Yale in 2012. There he is now Professor of Epidemiology, holder of the Teresa and H. John Heinz III Chair in Chemistry for the Environment and Director of the Center for Green Chemistry and Green Engineering at Yale University, New Haven, Connecticut, USA. Anastas is known for his engaging and inspiring lectures and has received numerous awards and honors for his research.

John. C. Warner, born in 1962 in Quincy, Massachusetts, USA, received his BS in chemistry also from the University of Massachusetts, Boston, USA, and his MA and Ph.D. in Organic Chemistry from Princeton University, New Jersey, USA. After several years of research at the Polaroid Corporation, he returned to the University of Massachusetts from 1996 to 2007. Among other things, Warner introduced the world's first doctoral program in green chemistry there. In 2007 he co-founded the Warner Babcock Institute for Green Chemistry with James Babcock, of which he was President and CTO until 2020. Today he is Senior Vice President (Chemistry) and Distinguished Research Fellow at Zymergen Corporation as well as Global Sustainability Chair at University of Bath, UK, Associate Professor of Green Chemistry at Monash University, Melbourne, AUS, and Invited Professor at AgroParisTech, FR . Warner is also involved in the non-profit organization Beyond Benign, which he co-founded and which promotes green chemistry education. Warner has published over a hundred publications and received numerous awards for his work. In 2017, for example, the German Ministry of Economic Affairs and the Technical University of Berlin announced that they would name the "Chemical Invention Factory", which serves to promote and support technology transfer in green chemistry, "John Warner Center for start-ups in Green Chemistry" in Warner's honour . The realization of the new building is currently in the second of three planning phases, with completion scheduled for 2025.

The GDCh awards the August Wilhelm Hofmann Commemorative Medal - a gold coin - to personalities from Germany or abroad who have achieved great things for chemistry. The prize has a long tradition and was already established in 1902 by the predecessor company, the German Chemical Society.

The European Chemical Society (EuChemS) is the successor organization to the FECS (Federation of European Chemical Societies), which was founded in 1970 with the significant participation of the GDCh. EuChemS has more than 40 chemical science societies in over 30 countries as members, including the GDCh as the largest continental European chemical society with around 30,000 members - around 20 percent of the chemists represented by EuCheMS. The scientific activities of EuChemS are mainly carried out by the corresponding divisions and working parties. The focus is on the EuChemS Chemistry Congress, which takes place every two years.

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Paul T. Anastas (Foto: privat)
John C. Warner (Foto: privat)

13 Mathematical and scientific societies: strengthening basic research in Germany

13/22
July 06, 2022

On the occasion of the "International Year of Basic Sciences for Sustainable Development 2022/2023 (IYBSSD)" proclaimed by UNESCO, the five major specialist societies in the life sciences, chemistry, geosciences, mathematics and physics are calling for more appreciation of basic research in Germany and its importance for sustainable development to communicate better and promote more effectively.

The global challenges posed by climate change, energy security, biodiversity conservation, food security, health care and pandemic management are enormous.

The mathematical and scientific disciplines provide basic methods and instruments with the help of which the challenges can be recorded, described and analyzed and possible solutions can be offered.

The mathematical and scientific societies united in the "Science Connects" initiative emphatically welcome the activities of UNESCO, which recommended 2022/2023 as the "International Year of Basic Sciences for Sustainable Development" in order to underline the importance of basic research for sustainable development. For the IYBSSD, UNESCO names fields of action and priority topics in which the mathematical and scientific societies are already active individually or jointly. Basic research is seen as a source of dialogue and peace, of innovation and economic development, of education and for overcoming global challenges. The accessibility of scientific knowledge and the strengthening of the visibility of women in basic research are also emphasized.

In addition, the large specialist societies in the life sciences, chemistry, geosciences, mathematics and physics see additional fields of action that should be taken up and consolidated in this international year.

Politicians and society should appreciate the fundamental importance of high-quality basic research for sustainable development, communicate it better and promote it more effectively. From the point of view of the mathematical and scientific societies, the following points are necessary for this:

- Tendering procedures and funding criteria must be designed in such a way that they do justice to the specific character of basic research. Specific funding programs for basic research are to be set up.

- Research sponsors, universities and political decision-makers should provide additional funds for public outreach programs at federal and state level that make the character and importance of basic research transparent and understandable for the public.

- Within the framework of school lessons and universities, the conditions must be created so that learners understand the basics of scientific work. Those responsible for education in the federal states or at the universities must ensure that there are appropriate curricula, appropriate hourly quotas and well-trained teachers.

The companies understand sustainable development as a common task, which is also an opportunity and obligation to enter into new cooperations and alliances with other active members of civil society. The specialist societies want to clearly emphasize this link in the "International Year of Basic Sciences for Sustainable Development".

The position paper is available online at:
https://wissenschaft-verbindet.de/gemeinsame-aktivitaeten/positionspapier-Basic Research

 

The five major mathematical and scientific societies - the umbrella organization for geosciences (DVGeo), the German Mathematical Society (DMV), the German Physical Society (DPG), the German Chemical Society (GDCh) and the Association of Biology, Biosciences and Biomedicine in Germany (VBIO) together represent over 130,000 members. They share the awareness that those working in science bear a particularly high degree of responsibility for shaping human life as a whole.

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12 Statistics on chemistry courses published in 2021

More degrees but fewer beginners than last year

12/22
July 5, 2022

Significantly more students obtained bachelor's and master's degrees last year than in the previous year. The number of doctorates in chemistry courses also increased ? only in biochemistry did it remain at around the same level as the previous year. On the other hand, fewer young people decided to study chemistry in 2021 than in 2020. This is shown by the annual statistics for chemistry courses from the German Chemical Society (GDCh). The proportion of graduates looking for a job and those who initially accepted temporary positions remained at a low level.

A total of 8233 people decided to study chemistry last year (2020: 9384 people). The number of students who completed a chemistry course with a master's degree or the first state examination rose to 3727 (2020: 3244), as did the number of doctorates, which rose from 2104 in 2020 to 2231 in the reporting year.

The following results were obtained in the individual courses:

  • In the field of chemistry/business chemistry, the universities reported 5129 new students (2020: 5671). 2431 students (2020: 2037) successfully completed their bachelor's degree, 2219 received their master's degree (2020: 1956). The median duration of study was 6.9 semesters to obtain a bachelor?s degree (2020: 6.9) and 5.1 semesters to obtain a master?s degree (2020: 5.0). In 2021, 1972 people received their doctorates in chemistry/business chemistry (2020: 1838). The median duration of doctoral studies was 8.2 semesters (2020: 8.2).
  • 1,644 people began their studies in biochemistry and life sciences (2020: 1,852). The number of bachelor's degrees rose to 992 (2020: 745) and that of master's degrees to 842 (2020: 732). The number of doctorates fell slightly in 2021 to 209 (2020: 214). The length of study increased, the median was 6.7 semesters for bachelor?s degrees (2020: 6.6), 5.1 semesters for master?s degrees (2020: 4.9) and 9.3 semesters for doctorates (2020: 8.9).

     

  • In food chemistry , the number of first-year students fell from 466 in the previous year to 390. A total of 214 students passed the main examination A (1st state examination) or the diploma examination (2020: 148) and 157 people passed the main examination B (2nd state examination). (2020: 145). In addition, the universities reported 211 bachelor's and 155 master's degrees (2020: 144 and 110, respectively). The number of doctorates fell to 50 (2020: 52).
  • At universities of applied sciences (HAW), 1,070 people began studying chemistry, significantly fewer than in the previous year (2020: 1,395). The number of Bachelor's degrees also fell to 696 (2020: 731), while the number of Master's degrees rose to 452 (2020: 408). However, it should be noted that only 20 of the 24 HAWs contacted made their figures available in the year under review.

99% of all bachelor's graduates at universities and 77% at HAW went on to do a master's degree. Around 84.7% of master's graduates at universities began a doctorate. This value is still lower than the long-term average (90%).

44% of the graduates in chemistry with a doctorate are aware of the first step into professional life. According to data from the universities, around 34% took up a position in the chemical and pharmaceutical industry (2020: 38%), 21% (2020: 20%) took on a temporary position in Germany (including postdoc). 14% worked in the rest of the economy after graduating (2020: 12%) and 13% took a job abroad after graduating (2020: 11%). Around 6% of graduates held a position in the public sector (2020: 4%). At the time of the survey, 7% were considered job seekers (2020: 10%).

The proportion of jobseekers is around the values of the years 2006-2013 (between 7% and 10%). The number of "real" job seekers is likely to be slightly lower, as it is every year. Due to the key date of the survey on 31.12. Graduates who start their new job in January or February are still recorded as job-seekers.

The brochure "Statistics of chemistry courses 2021" is available at www.gdch.de/statistics as a flip catalogue.

With around 30,000 members, the German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. Among other things, it deals with current developments at universities and on the job market. Since 1952, the GDCh has been collecting extensive statistical data on chemistry courses every year. The statistics for 2021 are based on data from the courses in chemistry and business chemistry, biochemistry and life science, food chemistry chemistry and chemistry courses at the Universities of Applied Sciences (HAW), formerly universities of applied sciences. The number of beginners and students, the number of passed final exams and the respective final grades and duration of study were queried. In addition, some universities provided information on their graduates' career entry after graduation or doctorate. The reference date for the survey is December 31st.

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Abb. 1: Summe der Studienanfänger/-innen in den Chemiestudiengängen
Abb. 2: Examina im Studiengang Chemie (ohne Studiengänge Biochemie, Lebensmittelchemie, Lehramt Chemie)
Abb. 3: Erster Berufsschritt der promovierten Chemieabsolventinnen und -absolventen 2021 (ohne Studiengänge Biochemie, Lebensmittelchemie, Lehramt Chemie)
 

11 Bert Meijer receives the Hermann Staudinger Award

Further awards at the Conference for macromolecular chemistry

11/22
June 28, 2022

The German Chemical Society (GDCh) honors Professor Dr. Egbert Willem "Bert" Meijer, Eindhoven University of Technology, Netherlands, with the Hermann Staudinger Award 2022. He will receive the award, which is endowed with 7,500 euros, on September 12 at the Biennial Meeting of the GDCh Division of Macromolecular Chemistry 2022, from September 12th to 14th in Aachen. The Conference will also include two Dr. Hermann Schnell scholarships and the Reimund-Stadler Award of the GDCh Division of Macromolecular Chemistry .

Bert Meijer receives the Hermann Staudinger Award for his outstanding and very creative contributions in the field of supramolecular polymer chemistry. Among other things, Meijer researches and develops functional supramolecular polymers as a new class of materials. Through targeted molecular design and synthesis, he realized systems in which monomeric units, which combine themselves to form supramolecular polymeric materials, achieve special material properties. Before its discovery, these properties were thought to be unique to (covalently linked) macromolecules. The reversible binding of the building blocks enables easy processing. Supramolecular materials can thus be processed at much lower temperatures and pressures, while the tunable nature of supramolecular polymers opens new avenues for these systems. Many of von Meijer's strategies are "biomimetic", transferring principles of biological organization to synthetic polymeric materials.

Bert Meijer, who was born in Groningen in the Netherlands in 1955, studied organic chemistry at the University of Groningen, where he also received his doctorate in 1982. After working at the Philips Natuurständig Laboratorium in Eindhoven and at Koninklijke DSM in Heerlen, he became Professor of Organic Chemistry at the Technical University of Eindhoven in 1991. He has also been Adjunct Professor at Radboud University Nijmegen since 1994, Distinguished University Professor of Molecular Sciences in Eindhoven since 2004 and Visiting Professor at the University of California, Santa Barbara, USA since 2008. From 2008 to 2018 he was also director of the Institute for Complex Molecular Systems in Eindhoven. Meijer has been a professor at the Royal Netherlands Academy of Sciences since 2014, has been an External Scientific Member of the Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research in Mainz since 2018 and has been a guest lecturer at the University of New South Wales in Sydney, Australia, since 2022.

Bert Meijer has already received various scientific awards, such as the SPINOZA Prize of the Netherlands Organization for Scientific Research (NWO) (2001), the Humboldt Research Prize of the Alexander von Humboldt Foundation (2017) and two ERC Advanced Research Grants (2010 and 2018). He is an honorary member of numerous academies and societies, has an impressive number of guest professorships and named lectures and achieves an h-index of 135 with over 750 scientific publications.

As part of the Conference , two young scientists will also receive a Dr. Herrmann Schnell grant. Professor Dr. Eva Blasco, Ruprecht-Karls-University Heidelberg, receives a grant worth 3000 euros for her innovative research work in the highly topical area of functional materials for 3D laser printing and lithography. The research activities of the award winner on materials for 4D printing applications have the potential to revolutionize research fields such as microrobotics. Another Dr. Herrmann Schnell grant of 3,000 euros is awarded to Dr. Robert Göstl, DWI - Leibniz Institute for Interactive Materials eV, Aachen, for his impressive research in the field of mechanophores. His work makes it possible to functionalize materials in new ways. The improved material properties open up new areas of application. The Dr. Hermann Schnell grants are awarded by the foundation of the same name, which is part of the GDCh, to support young scientists in the field of macromolecular chemistry, its physical-chemical basics and its analytics.

In addition, Dr. Robert Göstl was awarded the Reimund-Stadler Award by the GDCh Division of Macromolecular Chemistry. The Division awards the prize, which is endowed with 5,000 euros, usually in even-numbered years as part of the Division conference , to a prospective university teacher from the field of polymer chemistry and related areas. The awardee winner will be determined from among the participants of the university workshop for young talents. Göstl convinced the selection committee with his lecture entitled "From force-reporting to force-resistant: using mechanochemistry to understand polymer materials".

Further information on the Conference at www.gdch.de/makro2022

With around 30,000 members, the German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 27 Divisions, including the Division of Macromolecular Chemistry with over 1300 members. The Division brings together scientists from universities, research institutes and industry from all areas of polymer chemistry and physics. The Division of Macromolecular Chemistry has the right to propose the Hermann Staudinger Award of the GDCh, named after the 1953 Nobel Prize winner in chemistry and endowed with 7,500 euros.

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Professor Dr. Egbert Willem “Bert” Meijer (Foto: privat)
Professorin Dr. Eva Blasco (Foto: Universität Heidelberg, Kommunikation und Marketing)
Dr. Robert Göstl (Copyright: Hannes Woidich)
 

10 Paul Bunge Prize goes to Matthew L. Jones

Calculators, philosophy and artificial intelligence

10/22
May 31, 2022

professor dr Matthew L. Jones, Columbia University, New York, USA, receives the Paul Bunge Prize 2022. The award ceremony will take place on July 1 as part of the lecture conference of the GDCh Division of History of Chemistry in the Baden State Library in Karlsruhe. The prize of the Hans-R.-Jenemann-Foundation is endowed with 7,500 euros and is awarded jointly by the German Chemical Society (GDCh) and the German Bunsen Society for Physical Chemistry (DBG). It honors outstanding work on the history of scientific instruments.

Matthew L. Jones receives the Paul Bunge Prize for his cutting-edge and pioneering work at the intersection of the history of calculators, philosophy and artificial intelligence. A special focus is on his work "Reckoning with Matter", in which the awardee describes the development of calculating machines from the early seventeenth to the early nineteenth century. In addition to the concrete stories about the work, the technology and the wages that were necessary to produce these scientific instruments, the book also covers the topics of industrial espionage and intellectual property and does not omit philosophical reflections on the meaning of these machines. Among other things, Jones illuminates the correspondence between (art) craftsmen and philosophers, addresses technical, financial, social and legal issues and shows in an impressive way how the material and the world of thinking were brought into harmony with each other in thinking machines.

Matthew L. Jones studied history and philosophy of science at Harvard College and Cambridge University and received his doctorate in the history of science in 2000 from Harvard University, Cambridge, USA. He then moved to Columbia University, New York, USA, where he is now Professor of History and James R. Barker Professor of Contemporary Civilization. Jones has received numerous grants and awards for his research and has a large number of notable publications. In addition to his research, he is also involved in various (university) committees and has worked as an advisory editor, lecturer and reviewer, among other things.

The Paul Bunge Prize is the world's most important honor in the field of the history of scientific instruments and is advertised publicly and internationally. In addition to German scientists, it has also gone to British, Italian, US, Australian and Canadian scientists. The Advisory Board of the Hans R. Jenemann Foundation, supported by the GDCh and the DBG, decides on the award. Hans R. Jenemann (1920?1996), chemist at Schott Glaswerke in Mainz, became known for his contributions to the history of scientific equipment, especially historical scales. He set up the foundation himself in 1992. The prize is named after the Hamburg precision mechanic Paul Bunge (1839-1888), one of the leading designers of laboratory balances for chemical analysis.

As part of the Conference, which offers a varied program on the history of chemistry and related areas from science and industry, the GDCh Division of History of Chemistry also awards the Bettina Haupt-Förderpreis for the history of chemistry. The award recognizes outstanding work in the history of chemistry by young scientists from German-speaking countries. This year Christopher Halm, University of Regensburg, receives the prize for his dissertation ?The early history of agricultural chemistry (1731-1813) ? chemical appropriation of the soil and the emergence of field laboratories?.

Further information on the Conference at www.gdch.de/geschichte2022

With around 30,000 members, the German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It maintains numerous foundations, such as the Hans R. Jenemann Foundation. The Paul Bunge Prize of the Hans R. Jenemann Foundation is awarded annually, alternately at DBG general meetings and lecture conferences of the GDCh Division of History of Chemistry.

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09 Andres Jäschke receives the Albrecht-Kossel Award

New insights thanks to RNA research

09/22
May 24, 2022

On June 30, the German Chemical Society (GDCh) awards the Albrecht-Kossel Award , which is endowed with 7,500 euros, to Professor Dr. Andres Jäschke, University of Heidelberg, for his work on the chemical biology of nucleic acids. The award ceremony takes place during the Conference of the GDCh Division of Biochemistry, which takes place from June 29th to July 1st in Münster.

Andres Jäschke convinced the selection committee with his pioneering contributions to the catalysis, regulation, modification and imaging of RNA. The RNA-based Diels-Alderase enzyme he developed and his work on it provided fundamental insight into the structural and functional properties of RNA ribozymes. His discovery of natural RNA modifications brought completely new insights into the field of so-called epitranscriptomics. Jäschke found that bacterial RNA can wear a nucleic acid (NAD)-based protective cap that significantly affects RNA lifespan. With this fundamental discovery, the awardee established a whole new branch of RNA biochemistry. Jäschke can also show impressive research results in live cell imaging, in the development of novel DNA photoswitches and the development of bioorthogonal modifications of RNA and DNA. In his work, he combines organic synthesis with molecular and cell biology, biochemistry, bioinformatics and modern bioanalytical methods.

Andres Jäschke, born in 1962, studied chemistry at the Humboldt University in Berlin, where he also received his doctorate in 1993. After a two-year stay as a postdoc at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, USA, he took over the management of his own research group at the Free University of Berlin in 1995, where he habilitated in 2000. Two years later, Jäschke accepted a professorship at the University of Heidelberg, where he still works today as a professor of pharmaceutical and bioorganic chemistry. For his work, he received an ERC Advanced Grant (2020), the Hellmut Bredereck Prize from the GDCh foundation of the same name (2001) and the BioFuture Prize from the Federal Ministry of Education and Research (1998). In addition to his scientific commitment, Jäschke is actively involved in the GDCh, of which Jäschke has been a member since 1998 - including on the Board of the Division of the Biochemistry section.

Further information on the Conference at www.gdch.de/biochemistry2022

With around 30,000 members, the German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 27 Divisions and sections and awards numerous prizes for outstanding achievements in various sub-disciplines of chemistry. The Albrecht-Kossel Award , endowed with 7,500 euros, was established in 2012 and awarded for the first time in 2014. The prize was named after Ludwig Karl Martin Leonhard Albrecht Kossel (1853?1927), a German biochemist, physician and physiologist. In 1910 he was awarded the Nobel Prize in Physiology or medicine for his research on the cell nucleus and the isolation of nucleic acids and determination of their constitution.

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08 News from the world of analytics

Research meets application at the analytica conference 2022

08/22
May 12, 2022

From June 21 to 24, 2022, analytica, the world's leading trade fair for laboratory technology, analytics and biotechnology, will take place for the 28th time at the Munich Exhibition Center. It will be accompanied by the analytica conference from June 21 to 23. In numerous sessions, scientists report on current topics from analytics, quality control, diagnostics, measurement and testing technology as well as from biotechnology and the life sciences. The scientific program of the analytica conference is organized by the Analytical Forum, composed of the German Chemical Society (GDCh), the Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (GBM) and the German Society for Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (DGKL).

After the last analytica took place online due to the pandemic, there will again be the opportunity for personal exchange on site in Munich in 2022. The Analytics Forum has created an extensive program for the conference that covers almost all fields of analytics and presents the latest trends and developments. Central to this is that the topics always have a high degree of practical relevance, so that research and application both get their money's worth.

The high topicality can be seen, for example, in a session on aerosols and health. Among other things, it is about the limits and possibilities of investigations into the effects of exhaust gases on human lung cells. The presentation of a new photochemical method for toxicological investigations of aged aerosols from forest fires is about an innovative approach to measuring aerosols. Another lecture shows how photochemical processing affects the properties of aerosols resulting from combustion.

But current trends and developments in food and water analysis are not neglected in the program of the analytica conference either: One session is dedicated to the analysis of emerging dangers in food, for example. Among other things, the focus here is on mycotoxins - in particular new derivatives in the field of aflatoxin B1 - and the latest developments in their (bio)analysis; but also the analysis of pyrrolizidine alkaloids, carcinogenic plant toxins, is discussed. Water analysis is the focus of several sessions. Among other things, experts will provide information about the latest in rapid methods for detecting pathogens and antibiotic-resistant bacteria in the water cycle, about the challenges of non-target screening in water analysis and about how digitization can support modern water analysis.

These are just a few highlights of the scientific program. In a total of 45 sessions, proven experts provide insights into almost all areas of analysis. In addition, a number of scientific awards will be presented at the conference: the GDCh Division of Analytical Chemistry awards the Clemens-Winkler Medal and the Division Award prize for analytical chemistry, the Working Group Separation Science of the Division awards the Eberhard-Gerstel Award and the Gerhard-Hesse Award and the German working group Group for Analytical Spectroscopy (DAAS) of the Division awards the "Bunsen-Kirchhoff Award for Analytical Spectroscopy". An accompanying poster exhibition, supported by the companies Agilent and Merck, rounds off the program.

The analytica conference takes place in the ICM ? International Congress Center Munich, on the exhibition grounds. The conference language is English. Admission is free for visitors to analytica. The joint stand of the Analytics Forum is located in Hall B2, No. 505.

The current program for the analytica conference can be found at www.gdch.de/analyticaconf2022 or in the event database at www.analytica.de/konferenz.

Contact for the press:

analytica conference
Maren Mielck
German Chemical Society
public relations
Phone: +49 69 7917-327
Email: pr@gdch.de

analytica
Claudia Grzelke
PR Manager Munich Trade Fair
Phone: +49 89 949-21498
Email: press.shows@messe-muenchen.de

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07 Gisbert Schneider receives the Gmelin-Beilstein commemorative coin

Award ceremony at the German Conference on Cheminformatics in Garmisch-Partenkirchen

07/22
April 12, 2022

The German Chemical Society (GDCh) awards Prof. Prof. adj. dr re. of course habil. Gisbert Schneider, Swiss Federal Institute of Technology Zurich, Switzerland, the Gmelin-Beilstein commemorative coin. The award will be presented on May 9th at the ?17th German Conference on Cheminformatics and EuroSAMPL Satellite Workshop?, the annual meeting of the GDCh Division ?computers in chemistry? in Garmisch-Partenkirchen.

The Gmelin-Beilstein commemorative coin, a silver medal associated with a certificate and prize money of 7,500 euros, is awarded by the GDCh to national and international personalities who have made special contributions to the history of chemistry, chemical literature or have acquired the chemistry information. professor dr Gisbert Schneider is one of the best-known scientists in the field of chemical information and chemoinformatics and is considered a pioneer of today's artificial intelligence approaches in drug design. He receives the award for his pioneering work in integrating machine learning methods into practical medicinal chemistry. It was also Schneider who coined medicinal chemistry with the terms "scaffold-hopping" and "frequent hitter", which have become indispensable in today's specialist vocabulary.

Gisbert Schneider, born in 1965, completed his diploma in biochemistry at the Freie Universität Berlin in 1991, where he also received his doctorate in 1994. After postdocs at the University Hospital Benjamin Franklin, Berlin, the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in Cambridge (Massachusetts) and the Max Planck Institute for Biophysics in Frankfurt am Main, he gained industrial experience at F. Hoffmann-La Roche AG, Basel, Switzerland. During this time, Schneider habilitated in biochemistry and bioinformatics at the Albert-Ludwigs-University Freiburg in 2000, where he subsequently worked as a private lecturer. From 2002 to 2009 he held the Beilstein endowed professorship for chemical and bioinformatics at the Goethe University in Frankfurt am Main, until he was appointed professor for computer-assisted drug design at the ETH Zurich in 2010. From 2018 to 2020, Schneider was also Associate Vice President of ETH Global. He has also been Director of the Singapore-ETH Center in Singapore since 2021.

Gisbert Schneider has received numerous awards for his scientific achievements, such as the Herman Skolnik Award from the Division of Chemical Information of the American Chemical Society (ACS) (2018) and the "Prous Institute - Overton and Meyer Award for New Technologies in Drug Discovery" from the European Federation for Medicinal Chemistry and Chemical Biology (EFMC) (2020). In 2014 he was named one of the World's Most Influential Scientific Minds by Thomson-Reuters.

Schneider has published more than 400 scientific papers, six world-renowned textbooks in drug design and chemical information, and was co-founder and editor of the Wiley-VCH journal Molecular Informatics.

Further information on the Conference at www.gdch.de/gcc2022

With around 30,000 members, the German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 27 Divisions, including the Division of Computers in Chemistry (CIC) specialist group with over 500 members. The Division was founded in 1982 because computer-aided management, archiving, analysis, querying and generation of information was also becoming increasingly important in chemistry. It sees its main task in bringing together domestic and foreign scientists interested in information and documentation as well as computer applications in chemistry in order to convey and develop the latest findings in this field of knowledge through a lively exchange of ideas and experiences.

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Professor Dr. Gisbert Schneider (Foto: Grace Baey)

06 Pioneer of quantum chemistry - Erich Hückel Award goes to Sigrid Peyerimhoff

06/22
April 5, 2022

The German Chemical Society (GDCh) honors Professor Dr. Sigrid Peyerimhoff with the Erich Hückel Award . The scientist receives the award, which is endowed with 7,500 euros, for the fundamental development of quantum chemical methods for calculating molecular properties, for clarifying chemical reactions and for analyzing molecular spectra. The award ceremony will take place during the 58th Symposium on Theoretical Chemistry, which will take place from September 18 to 22, 2022 in Heidelberg.

Sigrid Peyerimhoff is one of the most important and deserving theoretical chemists and did pioneering work in quantum chemistry, which not least led to the world-leading positioning of German theoretical chemistry. In addition to the fundamental development of quantum chemical methods, the GDCh particularly appreciates her development of the multi-reference approach in the configuration interaction method (MRD-CI) with selection and energy extrapolation including the spin-orbit interaction. Thanks to this method, pioneering investigations of molecules and ions in atmospheric chemistry, in the field of electron-molecule scattering and the calculation of the stability of atomic and molecular clusters became possible.

The MRDI-CI method was initially applied to very small model systems. As a "theoretical spectrometer" it exceeded the experimental accuracy and thus made a decisive contribution to the recognition and establishment of theoretical chemistry as an indispensable fundamental subject of chemistry.

Sigrid Peyerimhoff was born in Rottweil in 1937. After graduating from high school in 1956, she physics at the Justus Liebig University in Gießen and graduated in 1961 with a diploma. She then did her doctorate in Gießen in theoretical physics on quantum chemical calculations of the hydrogen fluoride molecule. After research stays in the USA, including at the University of Chicago, the University of Washington and Princeton University, she habilitated in theoretical physics at the University of Gießen in 1967. From 1970 she was a professor of theoretical chemistry at the University of Mainz and from 1972 at the University of Bonn, where she headed the Institute for Physical and Theoretical Chemistry. In 2002 she became emeritus.

Sigrid Peyerimhoff published a total of around 500 studies in scientific journals and anthologies. She has received numerous renowned prizes and awards, such as the Leibniz Prize of the German Research Foundation (1988), the Cothenius Medal of the German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina (2007), the Great Federal Cross of Merit (2008) and the Alexander von Humboldt Medal of the Society of German Natural Scientists and Physicians (2018).

In addition to her academic work, Peyerimhoff took on important tasks and functions in scientific societies and committees. In 1987 she was a founding member of the Academy of Sciences in Berlin and from 1990 to 1996 Vice President of the German Research Foundation. In 1999 she was appointed a member of the German Academy of Natural Scientists Leopoldina. Peyerimhoff is also a member of the German Academy of Science and Engineering, the Academia Europaea and the North Rhine-Westphalian Academy of Sciences and Arts. From 2006 to 2009 she was President of the International Academy of Quantum Molecular Science.

Sigrid Peyerimhoff has been a GDCh member since 1973. In her honor, the Working Group Theoretical Chemistry has been awarding the Sigrid Peyerimhoff PhD Award Prize to outstanding doctoral theses in the field of theoretical chemistry since 2021.

Further information on the award winner can be found in the current issue of the GDCh membership magazine ' journal Nachrichten aus der Chemie in the article " Outstanding: The Hückel awardee Sigrid Peyerimhoff and Gernot Frenking ".

With around 30,000 members, the German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. In addition to 27 Divisions , seven working groups are based under its roof, including the Theoretical Chemistry working group, which is supported jointly by the German Bunsen Society for Physical Chemistry and the German Physical Society. The Theoretical Chemistry group organizes annual symposia for theoretical chemistry.

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Professorin Dr. Sigrid Peyerimhoff (Foto: privat)

05 Excellent teaching at universities

Ars legendi Faculty Prize for Mathematics and Natural Sciences 2022 awarded

05/22
March 22, 2022

The Ars legendi Faculty Prize for excellent university teaching teaching in mathematics and the natural sciences 2022 goes to Dagmar Hann and Daniela Meilinger (biology, LMU Munich), Nele Milsch (chemistry, Göttingen), Martin Schlather (mathematics, Mannheim) and Julia Sammet (physics, Frankfurt /Main).

The Ars legendi Faculty Prize for Mathematics and Natural Sciences honors outstanding, innovative and exemplary achievements in university teaching teaching.

The prize is awarded by the Stifterverband, the Association of Biology, Life Sciences and Biomedicine in Germany (VBIO), the German Chemical Society (GDCh), the German Association of Mathematicians (DMV) and the German Physical Society (DPG). It has been awarded annually since 2014 in the categories of biology, chemistry, mathematics and physics and is endowed with 5000 euros each. The award awardee are determined by a jury made up of students and teachers from the participating subjects as well as university didactics.

The Ars legendi Faculty Prize for Mathematics and Natural Sciences 2022 goes to the following people:

In the biology category: to Dagmar Hann and Daniela Meilinger
Dagmar Hann and Daniela Meilinger from the Faculty of Biology at the Ludwig-Maximilians-University in Munich have developed an interdisciplinary and multimedia program that makes it easier for the numerous international students to enter the molecular biology master's degree courses. A large number of didactic methods are used, which are cleverly coordinated and interlinked in various modules. The outstanding thing about this is that there is also a focus on teaching methodological basics in order to transfer the heterogeneous educational background of international students into a common basis. Social networking between students is also actively promoted. The jury recognized this as an exemplary teaching concept that could also be taken up in other departments.

In the chemistry category: to Nele Milch
Nele Milsch from the Faculty of Chemistry at the Georg-August-Universität Göttingen developed and implemented a training concept for tutors (SciTuition) and thus made a significant contribution to improving teaching. Tutors make important contributions to teaching assistance at most universities and are important multipliers. Nele Milsch has developed a comprehensive, didactically sound and well thought-out concept for her training. This not only prepares the tutors professionally but also didactically for their task and also addresses specifics of chemistry studies such as internship supervision. The jury rated it as particularly positive that the tutors are offered further in-depth modules to accompany their work, and that they can also acquire credit points for this.

In the mathematics category: to Martin Schlather
Martin Schlather from the Faculty of Business Informatics and Business Mathematics at the University of Mannheim helped develop the innovative concept of "Service Learning", in which university teaching is combined with social commitment. He has developed this concept in several initiatives, such as the HAREBE project for improved teacher training or the STADS student initiative, and implemented it in his courses in a convincing and exemplary manner. The jury was particularly impressed by the fact that the direct practical relevance of this concept - such as the use of real data to convey the subject matter - emphasizes the social relevance of the statistical subject matter and builds bridges to later professional activity. In addition, the practical approach contributes significantly to the motivation and learning success of the students.

In the physics category: to Julia Sammet
Julia Sammet from the physics department at Goethe University Frankfurt founded a physics learning center as a student, which is aimed at all students whose subject also requires knowledge of physics. The concept of the learning center, which she developed with great commitment over the years, which primarily relies on peer-supported and self-activating learning, quickly proved to be so convincing that she was able to obtain funding from the faculty and then external funds for the further expansion of the center. During the lockdown caused by the pandemic, the concept proved to be so flexible that it was quickly and successfully transferred to virtual space. Thanks to the personal commitment of Julia Sammet and the support of the faculty, a professional learning support structure has emerged that has been extremely well received by the students and is viewed by the jury as a flagship project.

award ceremony
The date for the presentation of the Ars Legendi Faculty Prize for Mathematics and Natural Sciences 2022 has not yet been set. He will be announced in time.

Further information and contacts
Information on the Ars legendi Faculty Prize for Mathematics and Natural Sciences: https://stifterverband.org/ars-legendi-mn

Contact DPG:
Georg Düchs, phone: (02224) 9232-37; Email: duechs@dpg-physik.de
Press contact Stifterverband:
Peggy Groß, Tel.: (030) 322982-530 Email: peggy.gross@stifterverband.de

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04 "Communicating the future" - Young scientists meet in Hanover

04/22
March 17, 2022

The spring symposium of the Young Chemists Forum (JCF) of the German Chemical Society (GDCh) will take place from March 23rd to 26th under the motto "Communicating the Future". In addition to scientific lectures, the Conference at Leibniz Universität Hannover offers interactive workshops, poster sessions, social activities and numerous opportunities for personal exchange and networking. During the Conference , the Dres. Volker and Elke Münch Prize for science and research will be awarded to a young team of inventors for the first time. Another highlight is the presentation of the Carl Roth Prize for work on light-driven water splitting.

The JCF Spring Symposium is one of the largest conferences in Europe by and for young scientists. The event is organized annually by changing regional forums of the JungChemikerForum, the junior organization of the GDCh. In 2022, the regional JCF Hannover and Göttingen took over the organization and created a challenging program together. In line with the motto "Communicating the Future", neighboring specialist areas and the junior organizations of friendly societies were also included in the conference. Program items of the jDPG of the German Physical Society (DGB), the Junior-GBM of the Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (GBM) and the yPC of the German Bunsen Society for physical chemistry (DBG) are also represented at the Conference .

At the joint event, in addition to the lectures by internationally renowned scientists such as Professor Dr. Markus Antonietti (Max Planck Institute of Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam), Professor Dr. Michèle Heurs (Leibniz Universität Hannover), and Professor Deborah Kays (University of Nottingham, UK), in particular junior research group leaders and young scientists.

On March 24, the Dres. Volker and Elke Münch Prize will be awarded for the first time. The prize is endowed with 5000 euros and is given to preferably young inventors who have made a pioneering invention in the field of chemistry or chemical process engineering. The founding couple, Dr. re. nat Volker Münch and Dr. paed. Elke Münch wants to promote science and research and the patent protection of the results. The prize money is used to support the registration of a priority German patent application for the invention at the German Patent and Trademark Office.

This year, the award goes to Professor Dr. Rainer Ostermann, Felix Leven and Johannes Limberg from the Westfälische Hochschule, Recklinghausen, for the development of the so-called liquid-solid drying (FFT) for cost-effective airgel production. Thanks to this process, for example, high-performance insulating materials can be produced from aerogels at significantly lower prices than before. Airgel insulating materials have an insulating capacity that is two to four times higher than that of conventional insulating materials, but up to now they were ten to twenty times more expensive than, for example, glass wool. The new process now enables a large number of airgel-based insulation applications at significantly reduced costs.

Also on March 24th, the Carl-Roth Award will be awarded during the Conference . The GDCh awards the prize, which is worth 5,000 euros, to young chemists who develop resource-conserving synthetic routes or use chemicals in innovative ways. The prize is financed by Carl Roth GmbH & Co. KG, which also contributes a further 3,000 euros in the form of a voucher. The award goes to Dr. Jacob Schneidewind, RWTH Aachen, for his important contributions to the development of sustainable and resource-saving synthetic routes. In his master's thesis and his doctoral project at the University of Rostock and the Leibniz Institute for Catalysis, he set innovative impulses for photocatalytic water splitting for the production of green hydrogen, the material use of CO2 and the sustainable synthesis of organic molecules.

On March 25, Niels Krausch and Dr. Robert T. Giessmann and the team led by Christopher Keßler received the FAIR4Chem Award, which was presented for the first time, for their published data sets from chemical research. The prize is awarded by the NFDI4Chem consortium, in which the GDCh is involved, and supported by the chemical industry fund.

Further information can be found at https://symposium.jcf.io.

With around 30,000 members, the German Chemical Society is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of new scientific knowledge. The GDCh supports the creation of networks, transdisciplinary and international cooperation and continuous education and training in schools, universities and in the professional environment. The GDCh has 27 Divisions as well as 60 local sections branches and regional forums of the JungChemikerForum (JCF) at 54 university locations. The JCF forms a nationwide platform for around 10,000 young members of the GDCh.

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03 GDCh awards journalism prize and Carl-Duisberg Memorial Award prize

The Chemiedozententagung prizes are also awarded as part of the ADUC lecturers' conference

03/22
March 15, 2022

The German Chemical Society (GDCh) will award two of its renowned prizes at the Chemistry Chemiedozententagung ' Conference, which will take place from March 21 to 23 in Saarbrücken. Science journalist Lars Fischer receives the GDCh Prize for Journalism and Literature 2022 and Dr. Juliane Simmchen, Technical University of Dresden, is awarded the Carl-Duisberg Memorial Award Prize. The GDCh Association of German University Professors of Chemistry (ADUC) invites university teachers from the chemistry faculties from Germany and neighboring countries to the Conference . The Working Group also awards three ADUC prizes on site.

The GDCh awarded Lars Fischer the GDCh Prize for Journalism and Literature 2022 for his excellent journalistic work. The prize, which is endowed with 7,500 euros, is awarded for outstanding journalistic or literary achievements that make a special contribution to the dissemination of chemical-scientific content in German-speaking countries. Fischer receives the award for his excellent way of bringing chemistry and other natural sciences closer to all target groups, especially via digital formats. His range of topics extends from chemistry and materials research to infectious diseases and natural disasters. In the last two years, the science journalist has particularly distinguished himself with his well-founded and generally understandable articles on the Covid 19 pandemic.

Lars Fischer, who was born in Hamburg in 1978, began his career as a chemical laboratory assistant in analytics before studying chemistry at the University of Hamburg. After graduating, he started one of the first German science blogs and worked as a freelance science journalist. Today he is an editor at "pektrum.de" and "Spektrum - die Woche", oversees the blog platform "SciLogs" and runs the YouTube channel "We Will All Die" with Mike Zeitz. Fischer is also connected to the GDCh: in 2007 he gained early journalistic experience during an internship in the Editorial staff of the GDCh members' magazine "Nachrichten aus der Chemie".

The GDCh gives another special award to Dr. Juliane Simmchen, Technical University of Dresden. She receives the Carl-Duisberg Memorial Award for her fascinating approaches in the field of active matter, which include the creative use of photocatalytic nanoparticles, but also enzymes, bacteria and hybrid systems to propel microswimmers. The selection committee particularly emphasized that the prizewinner's research enabled her to assert herself in a highly competitive and interdisciplinary field of work and to establish an independent and highly visible research program.

The Carl-Duisberg Memorial Award , endowed with 7,500 euros, has been awarded since 1936 to young university teachers who work at a German university or as Germans at a foreign university, do not yet hold a W2/W3 or comparable position and are under 40 years of age to have. Of the prize money, EUR 5,000 goes directly to the awardee and the remaining EUR 2,500 to the working group.

Juliane Simmchen, who was born in 1986, studied chemistry at the Technical University of Dresden. After graduating in Analytical Chemistry in 2010, she received her PhD in Materials Science from the Catalan Institute of Nanosciences and Nanotechnology (ICN2) of the Autonomous University of Barcelona in Spain in 2014. After stays at the MPI for Intelligent Systems, Stuttgart, and at the Centro Brasileiro de Pesquisas Físicas, Rio de Janeiro, Brazil, she returned to the Technical University of Dresden in 2016 as a research assistant in the field of materials science . Since November 2016 she has been a Freigeist Fellow there on the subject of 'Light driven microswimmers' in physical chemistry. With her working group , she investigates colloidal materials and strategies to activate them. They construct so-called micromotors: small-scale structures made of synthetic and biological building blocks that can move autonomously, and they also investigate how different environments, such as interfaces or applied stimuli, affect this movement.

In addition, the ADUC honors three young scientists for establishing an independent research area. Jun.-Prof. dr Max M. Hansmann, TU Dortmund, receives an ADUC award for the development of synthetic approaches to unusual and highly reactive carbon compounds such as mesoionic N-heterocyclic olefins, diazoalkenes, triplet vinylidenes and electron-rich olefins and their comprehensive physical characterization. Jun.-Prof. dr Kai S. Exner, University of Duisburg-Essen, for the original research in the field of theoretical electrocatalysis to improve electrode materials for electrocatalytic processes or batteries. And Christopher J. Teskey, PhD, RWTH Aachen University, receives an ADUC award for the development of light-switchable transition-metal catalysts exemplified by cobalt-mediated hydroborations that enable stereoselective aldol reaction cascades and display switchable chemoselectivity.

Further information on the Conference at www.gdch.de/cdt2022

With around 30,000 members, the German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 27 Divisions and awards numerous prizes for special achievements in chemical research. The traditional Association of German University Professors of Chemistry (ADUC) , which is based at the GDCh, awards up to three young scientists every year (during habilitation, scholarship or junior professorship) for establishing an independent research area.

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Lars Fischer (Copyright: Harald Krichel)

Juliane Simmchen (Foto: privat)

02 Mathematical and scientific societies: Further and vocational training of teachers is not a leisure activity!

02/2022
March 9, 2022

A position paper by the mathematical and scientific specialist societies united in Wissenschaft-verbindets calls on politicians and school authorities to create qualified offers for teachers of mathematical and scientific school subjects and to make it easier for them to participate during regular working hours.

Mathematical and scientific findings are more important than ever, not only in view of climate change and the corona pandemic. At the same time, science is subject to high dynamics. This must be taken into account in the further development of mathematical and scientific school teaching. High-quality advanced and further training for teachers of mathematics and natural sciences are therefore an indispensable instrument for the continuous improvement of teaching.

These include the five mathematical and scientific specialist societies that are combined in Wissenschaft- verbindet ? the umbrella organization for geosciences (DVGeo), the German Mathematical Association (DMV), the German Physical Society (DPG), the German Chemical Society (GDCh) and the Biology Association , life sciences and biomedicine in Germany (VBIO) ? convinced.

The specialist societies, which represent more than 130,000 members across Germany, have now adopted a position paper on further and vocational training for teachers. It calls on politicians and school authorities to promote and further develop appropriate offers that meet the special needs of mathematical and scientific school subjects. Technical and didactic training offers as well as formats that combine both elements are necessary. Scientific progress and the current challenges in teaching development, e.g. B. in relation to digitization must be taken into account.

Sufficient financial and organizational support is essential for this. In particular, teachers for further or further training measures are to be released from teaching sufficiently and easily.

The mathematical and scientific societies emphasize very explicitly that further education and training should by no means only be postponed to the evening hours or weekends, but should of course be part of and included in the overall working time.

The position paper is available online at:
https://wissenschaft-verbindet.de/gemeinsame-aktivitaeten/download/positionspapier_fortbildungen.pdf

 

The five major mathematical and scientific societies - the umbrella organization for geosciences (DVGeo), the German Mathematical Society (DMV), the German Physical Society (DPG), the German Chemical Society (GDCh) and the Association of Biology, Biosciences and Biomedicine in Germany (VBIO) together represent over 130,000 members. What unites us is the awareness that those working in science are particularly responsible for shaping human life as a whole.


As representatives of our disciplines, we bring the actors together in a community of responsibility and values and commit ourselves to stand up for freedom, tolerance, truthfulness and dignity in science. We are convinced that scientific knowledge is a basic prerequisite for meeting the challenges of the future.
Website: https://wissenschaft-verbindet.de/


Press release as PDF document

01 100 years of the Stern-Gerlach experiment

01/22
February 4, 2022

Few physics experiments of the past 200 years have had as great an impact on science as the Stern-Gerlach experiment. The German Physical Society is therefore celebrating the epochal discovery on February 8, 2022 in Frankfurt's Paulskirche together with the Physical Society Frankfurt, the Department of physics at Frankfurt's Goethe University and the German Chemical Society . The 90-minute celebration begins at 6:00 p.m. The public can follow the event via live stream.

With the measurement results of the night from February 7th to 8th, 1922, the physicists Walther Gerlach and Otto Stern in the Alte physics (Robert-Mayer-Straße) in Frankfurt am Main succeeded for the first time in experimental proof of the quantization of the inner structure of atoms and molecules . This historic attempt is one of the most important experiments in physics in the 20th century and also had a major impact on chemistry. Stern and Gerlach have thus laid the foundation for modern quantum physics with many discoveries resulting from it: from nuclear spin methods, high-precision time measurement using atomic clocks, the maser and laser and much more.

100 years after the successful implementation of this important experiment, the German Physical Society (DPG), the Physical Society Frankfurt, the Department of physics at the Frankfurt Goethe University and the German Chemical Society (GDCh) are commemorating this historic moment with an approximately 90- minute ceremony in Frankfurt's Paulskirche. The main elements of the ceremony are the lecture "The Stern-Gerlach Experiment - A Milestone in the History of Physics" by Prof. Dr. Horst Schmidt-Böcking from the Institute for Nuclear Physics at the Johann Wolfgang Goethe University in Frankfurt am Main and the lecture "Stern-Gerlach in the Modern Age - Precision Physics with Stored Ions" by Prof. Dr. Klaus Blaum, Director at the Max Planck Institute for Nuclear Physics in Heidelberg and Vice President of the Chemical-Physical-Technical Section of the Max Planck Society. Mayor Nargess Eskandari-Grünberg will give the greeting. In addition, a dialogue between Prof. Dr. Dorothée Weber-Bruls, President of the Physical Society, and Dr. Lutz Schröter, President of the German Physical Society.

Registrations for the event until February 6 at labedzke@dpg-physik.de. The event can also be followed live without registration at https://hvo.events/dpg/.

backgrounds

Hardly any physics experiment of the past 200 years has had such a great impact on science as the Stern-Gerlach experiment. Using the molecular beam method developed by Otto Stern, he and Walther Gerlach succeeded in building a measuring device in 1922 with which they could examine the interior of atoms and later, with an improved version, even their nuclei and show that the building blocks of atoms do not follow the laws of classical physics . The molecular beam method used in the experiment was awarded the 1943 Nobel Prize in physics. As a result, around 45 other Nobel prizes for physics or chemistry were based on these findings - including Nobel prizes for the nuclear magnetic resonance process, for the development of the laser and for the atomic clock. They are all established techniques today that form the basis of all precision measurements.

A generally understandable explanation of the experiment and its scientific significance is provided by the DPG fact sheet Physics Concrete " 100 Years of the Stern-Gerlach Experiment ".

The German Physical Society e. V. (DPG), whose tradition goes back to 1845, is the oldest national and, with around 55,000 members, also the largest physical society in the world. As a non-profit association, it does not pursue any economic interests. With Conferences, events and publications, the DPG promotes the transfer of knowledge within the scientific community and would like to open a window to physics for everyone who is curious. Particular focal points are the promotion of young scientists and equal opportunities. The DPG is based in Bad Honnef on the Rhine. The representative office in the capital is the Magnus-Haus Berlin.
Website: www.dpg-physik.de

With around 30,000 members, the German Chemical Society is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of new scientific knowledge. The GDCh supports the creation of networks, transdisciplinary and international cooperation and continuous education and training in schools, universities and in the professional environment. The GDCh has 27 Divisions and 60 local sections.

Press release as a pdf document

Das Gemälde des österreichischen Kunstmalers Jürgen Jaumann zeigt Otto Stern (links) und Walther Gerlach (rechts). Die Idee zur Grafik in der Mitte stammt vom Physik-Nobelpreisträger Theodor Hänsch.
Bild: Jürgen Jaumann

Contact

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Head of GDCh-
public relations
pr@gdch.de
Tel. 069 / 7917-493

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last modified: 11.08.2022 08:29 H from N/A