Press releases 2016

56 The Association for Chemistry and Economics distinguishes itself - Matthias Henzgen receives study award for business chemistry

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December 6, 2016

The Association for Chemistry and Economics, a division of the German Chemical Society (GDCh), awards the study prize for business chemistry to Matthias Henzgen this year. The award for excellent academic performance in business chemistry, endowed with 1000 euros, will be presented to him on December 19 in Frankfurt am Main. Matthias Henzgen completed his bachelor's and master's degree in business chemistry at Heinrich Heine University in Düsseldorf between 2010 and 2015. Since the prizewinner was equally interested in the different worlds of chemistry and business, he specialized in widely differing areas of focus: In addition to theoretical chemistry and computer-aided simulation of biomolecules, he deepened his knowledge of finance and investment theory. During his studies, Henzgen was funded, among other things, by the federally initiated scholarship program ?Benefit Chances - The Germany Scholarship?. He gained insights into the professional world during various internships in the chemical industry and through his voluntary work as a member of the board of Heinrich Heine Consulting eV - the first student management consultancy in Düsseldorf. This year, Henzgen joined CTcon GmbH as a management consultant. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the Association for Chemistry and Economics, which emerged in 2002 from the Working Group for Chemistry and Business, which was founded in 1999. The VCW has set itself the goal of combining natural sciences, especially chemistry, and economics. The press release 56/16 as PDF for download.

55 Saving fuel through better lubricants - Evonik team receives Meyer-Galow Prize for industrial chemistry

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November 30, 2016

The 2016 Meyer Galow Prize for Business Chemistry goes to Dr. Thorsten Bartels, Boris Eisenberg, Dr. Klaus Schimossek and Dr. Torsten Stöhr from Evonik Industries. The Evonik team receives the 10,000 euro award for the development of a new generation of lubricant additives, the use of which can reduce the consumption and emissions of vehicles, machines and systems. The award ceremony will take place today during a ceremony at Evonik Industries in Essen. The award is presented by the President of the German Chemical Society (GDCh), Thisbe K. Lindhorst. The prize is awarded annually by the Meyer Galow Foundation for Business Chemistry, which is part of the GDCh. In the automotive industry, the efficient use of resources in particular plays an important role. But how can consumption and emissions be continually reduced? The Evonik team has developed a contribution to this and successfully established it on the market. The award winners provide manufacturers of lubricants with a new additive technology that enables consumption and thus emissions to be reduced. In vehicles, lubricants ensure that the friction between moving metal parts, such as in the engine, transmission or axle, remains as low as possible. In order to offer sufficient protection against friction without increasing consumption at the same time, they must have a certain toughness (viscosity). Lubricants with the Evonik team's new additive technology ensure that the viscosity of the lubricant remains as constant as possible over a wide temperature range and the engine is protected from wear. In this way, fuel consumption can be reduced and the service life of engines and transmissions can be extended. The new additive technology is a further development of the so-called comb polymers. These special polymers take the form of a ball in lubricants and thus influence the viscosity of lubricants in a targeted manner: At higher temperatures, the polymer balls expand considerably and thus thicken the lubricant to a greater extent than conventional additives. At very low temperatures they collapse and then hardly increase the viscosity. The Meyer Galow Prize for Business Chemistry is awarded annually to scientists in German-speaking countries who have successfully introduced a current innovation in chemistry to the market. The focus is on market launches that primarily take sustainability into account. The award was presented by Professor Dr. Erhard Meyer-Galow , the former CEO of Hüls AG and former President of the GDCh. Meyer-Galow mainly worked at the interface between chemistry and the market and gave lectures on "Business Chemistry in the Chemical Industry" at the University of Münster. Pictures can be requested from pr@gdch.de. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is owned by over 31,000 Members of the largest chemical science societies worldwide. It maintains numerous foundations, such as the Meyer-Galow Foundation for Business Chemistry, which Professor Dr. Erhard Meyer-Galow founded in 2012 to further promote business chemistry, especially under the aspects of sustainability and the need for Chemical products or processes with high value for our society.The task of the foundation, which is administered by the GDCh, is the annual award of the "Meyer Galow Prize for Business Chemistry".

54,300 euros per month for chemistry students - Hofmann scholarships 2017 advertised

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October 27, 2016

The August Wilhelm von Hofmann Foundation set up by the German Chemical Society (GDCh) is also awarding scholarships to support students for the 2017 summer semester. Bachelor students in chemistry and related areas can receive a scholarship of 300 euros per month from the foundation established in 2011 from April 2017 with a duration of 18 or twelve months. Applications must be submitted by February 1, 2017 to the respective GDCh local association chairperson or the spokesperson for the regional forums of the JungChemikerForum (JCF). Bachelor students in chemistry and related fields with very good academic achievements who are in an economically unfavorable situation can apply for one of the approximately 20 scholarships of the August Wilhelm von Hofmann Foundation. Another requirement is that the students are in the third to last or penultimate semester of their bachelor's degree at the beginning of the 2017 summer semester. A maximum of two applications per local section can be forwarded to the Board of Trustees, whereby the preselection is made by the GDCh local association chairman together with the spokesman for the respective JCF regional forum. They forward the documents to the Board of Trustees, which then decides on the exact number of scholarships. The decisions cannot be challenged. The scholarship cannot be extended. Every year in the winter semester there is a new application cycle. The scholarship is not counted towards BAFöG benefits, but double funding in addition to other performance-based material funding from the gifted funding agencies is excluded. The August Wilhelm von Hofmann Foundation is named after the first president of the GDCh predecessor organization, the German Chemical Society, founded in 1867. The founder is a long-standing GDCh member who died in 2010 and who bequeathed the majority of his fortune to the GDCh to support talented chemistry students. Further information at www.gdch.de/hofmannstiftung. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. The GDCh manages numerous dependent foundations on a fiduciary basis. The purpose of these foundations is to award prizes, sponsorship awards and grants. In addition to the August Wilhelm von Hofmann Foundation, special mention should be made of the Karl Ziegler Foundation, which awards the Karl Ziegler Prize, the GDCh award, worth 50,000 euros, for outstanding scientific achievements in chemistry. Also worth mentioning are the Paul Bunge Prize awarded by the Hans R. Jenemann Foundation, as well as the awards from the Hermann Schnell, Hellmut Bredereck, Georg Manecke, Klaus Grohe and Meyer Galow Foundation . Foundation councils decide on the award of prizes, awards and grants.

53 Training program 2017 - indispensable building blocks for a Career

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October 18, 2016

With the 2017 advanced training program, the German Chemical Society (GDCh) offers a wide range of opportunities to develop professionally, professionally and personally. The offer of 88 courses from 16 subject areas ranges from classic topics such as analytical chemistry or synthesis methods to courses without direct reference to chemistry such as "Successful application - from the application strategy to the interview" or "Good sales practice, GDP". A number of new courses have also been added to the program. In 2017, for the first time, the ?Basics of practical NMR Spectroscopy for technical staff? will take place due to the great demand. This important and versatile analytical technique is almost indispensable, especially in preparative chemistry. In the course, Dr. Johannes C. Liermann, scientific Head of the NMR department at the Institute for Organic Chemistry at the University of Mainz, a basic understanding of how modern digital NMR spectrometers work. The participants learn to carry out common NMR experiments and to adjust important parameters if necessary. Simple conversion and maintenance measures are also discussed. Also new is "Characterization of polymers and biopolymers using size exclusion chromatography GPC / SEC / GFC". Dr. Wolfgang Radke, Head of Application Development at PSS Polymer Standards Service GmbH in Mainz, gives an insight into the basics of GPC / SEC The expert explains the correct column selection and the influence of experimental parameters on the chromatographic separation. Calibration with narrow standards and alternative calibration methods are also discussed. An overview of more extensive chromatographic separation and characterization methods for polymers rounds off the course. This course has been supplemented and expanded ?Inorganic phosphors & LEDs.? In the tried and tested course, Professor Dr. Thomas Jüstel, Professor of Inorganic Chemistry and Materials Science at the Münster University of Applied Sciences, presents the current state of research and technology in inorganic phosphors and teaches structure-function relationships n based on the most important areas of application of phosphors. The participants learn to identify, characterize and, if necessary, modify applications suitable for their needs. In addition, the structure, function and applications of inorganic LEDs are also presented for the first time. ?Scientific writing? is a new addition to the program, especially for young chemists. Stephanie Möller, a qualified journalist and doctoral candidate in the field of Materials Science at the University of Osnabrück, shows how to put science on paper. Together with the participants of the seminar, she works out the individual stages in the writing of a scientific paper, identifies stumbling blocks and shows strategies for problem-solving. In addition to the theoretical basics, practice is not neglected in this course: The newly acquired knowledge is studied directly in exercises and tasks. The well-known and popular GDCh specialist programs "Certified Business Chemist (GDCh) ®" and "Certified Project Manager Business Chemistry GDCh" as well as "Certified Quality Expert GxP" and the advanced program "Certified Quality Expert GxP Plus" will of course also be offered in 2017 Participants - this year there were over 1,000 - from speakers with a high level of experience and competence. Detailed information and the program for download can be found at www.gdch.de/fortbildung. The printed program can be requested from fb@gdch.de. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of scientific knowledge. The GDCh supports training in schools and universities as well as continuous training for work and Career.

52 Non-fiction book Chemists in the “Third Reich” honored - Special prize from the chemical industry for Helmut Maier

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17th October 2016

This year, the Fonds der Chemischen Industrie awards the Bochum-based science and technology historian Helmut Maier a special prize of 10,000 euros for his book Chemiker im ?Third Reich?, published in 2015. The monograph is the result of extensive scientific and historical research carried out by the author. The German Chemical Society awarded the contract for the multi-year study. The scientific society has thus committed itself to coming to terms with the history of its predecessor societies. In the justification of the Fonds der Chemischen Industrie it is stated: ?Professor Maier has presented a work that undoubtedly represents a milestone for the German-language scientific and chemical history literature on the? Third Reich ?.? The book examines the history of German technical-scientific associations of chemistry in the time of National Socialism. It proves that many of the leading figures at the time were involved in it and that interested circles in Germany kept their involvement in the dark for a long time after the Second World War. "With his work, Professor Maier has set standards of scientific thoroughness and diligence," says the reason for the special award. On the basis of a systematic indexing of the accessible sources, he was able to "confidently prepare the extensive and bulky historical object including its diverse cross-links from an impact-historical perspective." Helmut Maier, born in 1957, studied electrical engineering and modern history with a focus on the History of Natural Sciences of the TU Braunschweig. He received his doctorate there in the department for the history of Pharmacy and natural sciences with a thesis on an engineering-historical topic. From 1999 to 2004 he was a research associate in the Max Planck Society's research program on the history of the Kaiser Wilhelm Society during National Socialism. He coordinated the focus on "armaments research". In 2005 Maier completed his habilitation at the Brandenburg Technical University Cottbus in the subject of technology, science and environmental history. Two years later he was offered the chair for technical and environmental history at the Ruhr University in Bochum. "Chemists in the" Third Reich "- The German Chemical Society and the Association of German Chemists in the Nazi Ruling Apparatus" by Helmut Maier was published by Wiley-VCH in 2015 (ISBN: 978-3-527-33846-7). "Interview with Helmut Maier from the Nachrichten aus der Chemie 4/15 ? The Fonds der Chemischen Industrie was founded in 1950 and is the support organization of the Verband der Chemischen Industrie. In 2016 it provides almost 11 million euros for basic research, young scientists and Chemical Education in schools The Fonds der Chemischen Industrie awards prizes for scientific books on chemistry at regular intervals. Further information is available at www.vci.de/fonds. With over 31,000 members, the German Chemical Society is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world Tasks include the discussion of the latest research results and the dissemination of current knowledge from all areas n chemistry. To this end, the GDCh organizes numerous conferences and acts as the publisher of numerous internationally renowned scientific journals. Books and brochures such as the ?HighChem hautnah? series are aimed at citizens interested in science.

Copyright: Wiley-VCH
Copyright: Wiley-VCH

51 Is it all just "appearance and cover"? - Freelancer Chemists and owners of free independent laboratories meet in Kirchheim

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October 13, 2016

From October 20 to 21, the division for Freelancer Chemists and owners of free independent laboratories and owners of independent laboratories of the German Chemical Society (GDCh) invites you to the 14th Colloquium Chimicum in Kirchheim near Munich. At this year's conference, which this year has the motto ?Cover and Cover?, freelance chemists including analytical chemists with or without testing facilities meet with colleagues from industry, universities or authorities to find out about current developments and to exchange experiences and take a look outside the box. The varied program of lectures on October 21 will deal with, among other things, dyes, current possible uses for metal pigments and how to avoid unpleasant odors in food and everyday products. Even before the start of the lecture program, the conference starts on October 20 with the general meeting of the division, a cultural program and the opportunity to share experiences over a hearty dinner. Further information at www.gdch.de/collchim2016. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It has 27 specialist groups and sections, including the division for Freelancer Chemists and owners of free independent laboratories and owners of independent independent laboratories with over 120 members.

50 Contributions of Chemistry to the Energy Transition - division Chemistry and Energy meets in Jena

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September 28, 2016

The youngest of the 28 specialist groups and sections of the German Chemical Society (GDCh), the division Chemistry and Energy, will hold its first annual meeting on October 6th and 7th in Jena. The division on January 1, 2016 from the working group of the same name, founded in 2009, which has already carried out successful conferences and workshops. This year there are particularly current topics on the program that deal with the contributions of chemistry to the energy transition in Germany. Lectures from academic research as well as from industry are planned in order to intensify and promote the dialogue between university and industrial research centers. The lectures on batteries will be accompanied by a contribution by Professor Dr. Jürgen Janek from the Justus Liebig University in Giessen, who outlines the chemical challenges on the way to more powerful batteries. This includes the search for new and improved materials for electrodes, electrolytes and separators, studies of charge and mass transport in storage materials, studies of the kinetics of complete electrodes and, in general, of interface phenomena. The focus of the lecture is on possible successor concepts to the current lithium-ion technology, which include not only visionary metal-air batteries but also lithium-sulfur batteries. Janek recently commented on the current development of solid-state batteries in the journal Nature Energy, in which the usual liquid electrolyte is replaced by a solid electrolyte. This type of battery is currently being researched internationally with increasing intensity, and the question that arises here in particular is whether a significantly higher energy density can be achieved through the use of lithium metal anodes. In addition to electricity-based energy sources, other sources will also play an important role in the future. It would be an important development if the greenhouse gas carbon dioxide (CO2) were used as a raw material. This is an important research topic in both academic and industrial laboratories. In this environment, Dr. Andreas Bode, BASF SE, presented alternative and environmentally friendly production processes for the chemical industry in the second main lecture. He reports on the coupled production of carbon and hydrogen as well as the catalytic CO2 activation for synthesis gas production. This is followed by presentations on power grid control with chlor-alkali electrolysis (Covestro AG) and on substance synthesis from CO2 (Evonik Industries). Gas hydrates and the efficient generation of H2 using new materials are the focus of further academic lectures (TU Dresden, FU Berlin, RU Bochum and University of Freiburg). In the center of the third main lecture by Professor Dr. Markus Antonietti, Max Planck Institute for Colloids and Interfaces in Potsdam, is on the subject of "Organic solids for metal-free catalysis". Furthermore, Professor Dr. Angelika Heinzel from the University of Duisburg-Essen will speak about technology options for electrolysis and fuel cells. In the last thematic block, electricity as a raw material for the synthesis of chemical compounds is discussed in particular. The introductory main lecture will first deal with the role of energy supply companies as suppliers of raw materials. For this purpose, Rene Schoof from the recently founded Uniper SE (formerly E.ON) could be won as a speaker. Researchers from Siemens AG and the Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology present the use of excess electricity as a raw material for the synthesis of fuels and H2O2. Another lecture deals with the future of the diesel engine, the emissions of which are to be significantly reduced through synthetic fuels (emission concepts for engines UG). Further information on the conference at www.gdch.de/energie2016 The German Chemical Society is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It organizes international and national conferences as well as advanced training courses in all areas of chemistry. In 2006, the GDCh energy initiative and the chemical energy research coordination group were launched to raise awareness of the fact that chemists can make a major contribution to solving the energy problem. In March 2009, the GDCh working group for Chemistry and Energy was founded, which was transferred to a GDCh division on January 1, 2016 with almost 300 members and currently has 316 members.

49 From comfortable to precarious - salary survey among doctoral students in chemistry

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September 27, 2016

How are chemistry doctoral candidates paid at German universities? Do you have a decent living? Does your position last for the full duration of the doctorate? This is what the German Chemical Society (GDCh) asked in its first doctoral student survey in June 2016. Income from doctoral students 91% of doctoral students stated that they were paid. 51% of them have a state office, 34% a third-party funded position, 14% a scholarship and 8% a position as a research assistant (multiple answers were possible). Almost 9% of the participants did not receive any money at the time of the survey. Among the doctoral students who want to complete their doctorate this year, the proportion of those who do not have a job was even over 20%. State positions were in most cases (85%) half-time positions, i.e. 50% of a full-time position. The salary of a full-time position is around 3600 to 4100 euros per month according to the collective bargaining agreements for the public service and the individual salary level. Third-party funded positions are somewhat better funded: 67% of them were half-time positions and 27% two-thirds to three-quarters positions. Doctoral students with a scholarship received in most cases between 1000 and 1750 euros, with an average of 1421 euros. Other sources of funding In addition to income from the university or scholarship provider, more than a fifth (22%) rely on parents, partners or other relatives to finance their living, 8% have a part-time job and around 5% have other sources, such as savings. 4% live on unemployment benefit I or II ("Hartz IV"). Participants who have a position at the university or a scholarship are financed on average 92% through this position. For 67% it is the only source of income. Two thirds of those who receive unemployment benefit live exclusively on it, the others have additional income from mini-jobs or are supported by relatives. Satisfaction of doctoral students 59% are fairly or very satisfied with the supervision and process of their doctorate, 26% only moderate and 15% are little or not at all satisfied. It is noticeable that those who have been working on their doctorate for some time are more dissatisfied than those who have not been there for that long. Many of the less satisfied participants complain about not having enough time for the actual doctorate because they are heavily involved in teaching or in other projects that are not directly related to the doctorate. This also often affects scholarship holders, although a scholarship is actually only intended for the preparation of a doctorate. Scholarship holders are also often dissatisfied with other factors: They usually have neither health nor pension insurance and only pay into the pension fund for the first time after completing their doctorate. If your scholarship expires before completing your doctoral thesis or you cannot find a job immediately, you are not even entitled to unemployment benefit I. Participants A total of 1465 doctoral students took part in the anonymous survey. 85% of the participants did their doctorate at a university, the others at an MPI, a Fraunhofer, Leibniz or Helmholtz institute or a research center. 40% of the participants were female. Further information: The full evaluation can be found in the October issue of Nachrichten aus der Chemie from page 1012 onwards. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of scientific knowledge. The GDCh supports training in schools and universities as well as continuous training for work and Career.

48 Hybrid materials for biomedicine - Georg Manecke Prize to Sebastian Kruss

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September 14, 2016

Georg Manecke would have turned 100 on June 13, 2016. The widow of the polymer chemist, who died in 1990, set up the Georg Manecke Foundation at the German Chemical Society (GDCh) in 1999 in order to pave the way for young scientists in their professional future and to help support the next generation of scientists in their husband's fields of work to promote in his sense. This is done through scholarships and the award of the Georg Manecke Prize, which was presented to Dr. Sebastian Kruss, University of Göttingen, is awarded. The international symposium on ?Functional Biointerfaces?, ie functional interfaces between biological materials, forms the framework for the ceremony on October 5th. In addition to preparative macromolecular chemistry, Georg Manecke's scientific interest focused on biochemical and biotechnical applications. He considered at an early stage to use polymeric substances for medical applications, for example for binding, transporting and targeted release of drugs. He was considered an exceptional researcher with a great pioneering spirit. In his research, Manecke Prize winner Kruss combines polymers with Nanomaterials in an innovative way with the aim of using these hybrids in biomedicine. Already in his doctoral thesis he dealt with biomimetic surfaces and showed how useful polymers are for chemically designing surfaces and investigating interactions with cells and tissue. Improving such tissue-material interactions is extremely important for medical implants. After completing his doctorate, Kruss went to the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) as a DFG scholarship holder, where he worked on carbon nanomaterials and graphene. He produced polymer / carbon nanotube hybrids that bind biomolecules such as sugar but also signal molecules, which changes their fluorescence. These hybrid structures can thus be used as biosensors. Kruss is currently doing his habilitation at the Georg-August University in Göttingen at the Institute for Physical Chemistry, where he is also setting up a junior research group. His general question now is how to produce and identify molecular recognition motifs from polymers and Nanomaterials . With new polymer / nanotube sensors, bacterial motifs are to be detected in order to be able to detect bacterial infections in hospitals and contamination on medical products at an early stage. Kruss will speak about his latest research in Berlin. Professor Dr. Rolf Mülhaupt, Freiburg, on biomimetic polymer materials. Professors Dr. Oskar Nuyken, Munich, and Dr. Rainer Haag, Berlin. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. The GDCh manages eleven dependent foundations on a fiduciary basis. The purpose of these foundations is to award prizes, sponsorship awards and grants. The Georg Manecke Prize is awarded to natural scientists with a doctorate for outstanding scientific achievements in recent years. It is also intended to promote scientific networking on an international level. The prize is endowed with 7,000 euros.

47 awards for food chemists - 45th German Food Chemists Day 2016

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13th September 2016

On Tuesday, September 13, 2016, the Food Chemistry Society, a division of the German Chemical Society (GDCh), honored some chemists for their special scientific achievements on the occasion of the 45th German Food Chemists Day in Freising-Weihenstephan. The Adolf Juckenack Medal went to Dr. Gunter Fricke, Frankfurt am Main, the Kurt Täufel Prize of the Young Scientist was received by Dr. Michael Granvogl, Freising, and the Bruno Roßmann Prize went to Dr. Stefan Kittlaus, Hamburg, awarded. In addition, the GDCh awarded Dr. Yanyan Zhang, Giessen, with the Gerhard Billek Prize, and Dr. Sören Meyer, Potsdam, and Dr. Sven Meckelmann, Lüdenscheid, each received a Josef Schormüller grant. The Food Chemistry Society awards the Adolf Juckenack Medal to personalities who have supported the work of the Food Chemistry Society through years of personal commitment in important positions or who have promoted the profession of food chemist through their work. That year, Dr. Gunter Fricke, Nestlé Deutschland AG in Frankfurt am Main, received the award for his many years of work in the division, including as chairman of the Food industry, as a board member and most recently as chairman of the food chemical society (from 2011 to 2014). This honored his great commitment and dedication to the young food chemists in particular. With the Kurt Täufel Prize of the Young Scientist, Dr. Michael Granvogl, Technical University of Munich, received an award, namely ?in recognition of his fundamental research on the subject of? Desired (aroma-active) and undesirable (?food-borne toxicants?) bioactive compounds in food: education and analysis, "according to the award document. Granvogl's research is characterized by innovation, creativity, interdisciplinary cooperation and competence, and his numerous scientific works, which have been published in high-ranking specialist journals, have received great national and international recognition. With the Bruno Roßmann Prize, the Food Chemistry Society honors outstanding scientific work that deals with rapid methods for the detection of harmful substances in food, methods for examining food with simple means as well as the improvement of nutrition, the reduction of pollutants and better physiological utilization. This year the Dr. Stefan Kittlaus, Eurofins Dr. Specht Laboratorien GmbH in Hamburg, for his work on the investigation of matrix effects in pesticide analysis, in which he describes the development and validation of a fully automatic multi-method for over 300 active ingredients in fruit and vegetables using a special chromatography process. The Gerhard Billek Prize for the best dissertation in the field of Food Chemistry to Dr. Yanyan Zhang, Justus Liebig University Giessen. This prize is announced by the GDCh for scientific originality and an interdisciplinary approach. In her work she deals with the development of novel fermentation systems for the production of non-alcoholic beverages with Basidiomycetes, a class of fungi whose species make up about 30% of all fungi. Dr. Sören Meyer, University of Potsdam, and Dr. Sven Meckelmann, currently at Cardiff University, each received a grant from the Josef Schormüller Memorial Foundation for a stay abroad. Further information at: www.gdch.de/lchtag2016. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the Food Chemistry Society, whose task it is to promote the exchange of ideas in the field of Food Chemistry and its related disciplines and to provide technical suggestions. With 2,900 members, the Food Chemistry Society is the largest division in the GDCh.

46 First award of the Erich Hückel Prize - recognition of the Bochum scientist Kutzelnigg

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September 8, 2016

Werner Kutzelnigg, professor emeritus for Theoretical Chemistry at the Ruhr University Bochum, is the first to be awarded the newly created Erich Hückel Prize of the German Chemical Society (GDCh). The prize, decided by the GDCh board in December 2014, is to be awarded for outstanding achievements in theoretical chemistry and is endowed with 7,500 euros. The first award ceremony will take place on September 28, 2016 as part of the 52nd Symposium for Theoretical Chemistry at the Ruhr University Bochum. The award document states that Werner Kutzelnigg will receive ?the Erich Hückel Prize in recognition of his fundamental and pioneering contributions to the understanding of chemical bonds, to the description of electron correlation effects and magnetic properties, and to the formulation of a relativistic quantum chemistry?. His work thus opened up a deeper understanding of the electronic structure of molecules and new possibilities for quantum chemical calculation. In doing so, he decisively shaped today's Theoretical Chemistry in Germany and around the world. Kutzelnigg, born in Vienna in 1933, received his doctorate in physical experimental chemistry from the University of Freiburg. Postdoc stays in Paris and Uppsala followed. In 1964 he began to do his habilitation in Göttingen, in 1970 he received his first professorship in Karlsruhe and then in 1973 he accepted a full professorship in Bochum. The GDCh awarded him the Carl Duisberg Memorial Prize in 1971 and the Liebig Memorial Medal in 1996. His textbook ?Introduction to Theoretical Chemistry? has given generations of German chemistry students insights into elementary chemical phenomena. The award is named after the German chemist and physicist Erich Hückel (1896-1980), who is considered a pioneer in quantum chemistry. His name is the Hückel molecular orbital method (HMO theory), the Hückel rules that define the aromatic state, and the Debye-Hückel theory from Electrochemistry. Further information on the conference at: www.stc2016.de The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. In addition to 28 specialist groups and sections, seven working groups are located under its roof, including the working group Theoretical Chemistry, which is jointly supported by the German Bunsen Society for Physical Chemistry and the German Physical Society. The GDCh board has granted the AGTC the right to propose the nomination of the members of the price commission. The AGTC also hosts the annual Theoretical Chemistry symposia.

45 Wöhler conference for inorganic chemists in Berlin - the latest trends and excellent scientists

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September 7, 2016

The 18th conference of the Wöhler Association for Inorganic Chemistry will take place from September 26th to 28th at the Free University of Berlin. The program includes trends from all areas of inorganic chemistry, from main group molecules to complexes of d- and f-block elements to solids and materials in basic research and industrial application. At the start of the event, Professor Dr. Holger Braunschweig was awarded the Alfred Stock Memorial Prize of the German Chemical Society (GDCh). The Wöhler-BASF Young Talent Award goes to Dr. Ulf-Peter Apple. Both award winners present their current work. Professor Dr. Holger Braunschweig, Julius Maximilians University of Würzburg, receives the renowned Alfred Stock Memorial Prize for his research and publications on novel compounds that result from the combination of main group elements, especially boron, and transition metals. Although boron is known for its complicated bonding, the chemist succeeded in synthesizing novel organometallic compounds containing boron. Braunschweig is researching the electronic structure of these compounds and looking for new boron-boron chain compounds. He has already published over 400 articles in renowned specialist journals, including the GDCh journals ?Angewandte Chemie? and ?Chemie in unserer Zeit?. Following the award ceremony, in his plenary lecture, the prize winner will present some new and partly unexpected findings on the controlled formation of boron-boron single, double and triple bonds and will present new and partly unprecedented reactivity patterns. The Wöhler-BASF Young Talent Award goes to Dr. Ulf-Peter Apfel, Ruhr University Bochum, for his outstanding work in the field of bioinorganic chemistry, in particular on model systems for CO dehydrogenase and on hydrogen-generating enzymes. The chemist completed his studies including his doctorate at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena in a short time and with excellent results (summa cum laude). After a postdoctoral stay at the Massachusetts Institute of Technology (MIT) in Cambridge, USA, he took up a position as an independent junior research group leader at the Ruhr University in Bochum in 2013. His work was initially funded by a Liebig grant from the Fonds der Chemischen Industrie; since 2014, Apfel has been supported by the DFG's Emmy Noether program. The 32-year-old has already published 31 publications in prestigious international journals, including the GDCh journals "Angewandte Chemie", "ChemBioChem" and "Nachrichten aus der Chemie". In the lecture ?Learning from Nature: From Enzymes to Functional Materials?, Apfel gives a direct insight into his research. The regular lecture program also offers interesting insights into current research. This is how Dr. Rainer Weber, Covestro Deutschland AG, in his lecture "NaCl electrolysis and industrial use of chlorine" from a large-scale demonstration plant for chlor-alkali electrolysis. By replacing the nickel cathode with an oxygen-consuming cathode, the electrical energy requirement could be reduced by up to 30 percent. Consistent use of this new technology could make a significant contribution to saving energy and thus reducing CO2 emissions. Other topics of the conference are, for example, the activation of fluorinated molecules at metal complex centers, the organometallic chemistry in super acids, in which unusual reactions can take place, and inorganic materials for sustainable energy supply. Further information on the conference is available at www.gdch.de/woehler2016. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the Wöhler Association for Inorganic Chemistry with around 800 members. The biennial lecture conference of the Wöhler Association has developed into one of the most important forums for the presentation of the latest trends from all areas of inorganic chemistry in German-speaking countries. The division awards the Wöhler-BASF Young Talent Award, endowed with 5,000 euros. The award is financially supported by BASF. The Alfred Stock Memorial Prize, on the other hand, is awarded by the GDCh. It is endowed with 7,500 euros and is reminiscent of Professor Dr. Alfred Stock, who taught and researched in Breslau, Berlin and Karlsruhe from 1909 to 1943. The press release 45/16 as PDF for download.

44 Electrochemistry 2016 - Electrochemists from all over the world meet in Goslar

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September 6, 2016

Electrochemical processes play an important role in many areas of daily life: From ubiquitous corrosion to electrochemically manufactured or coated materials, from sensors to batteries, we encounter Electrochemistry. In addition, Electrochemistry offers a wide range of interesting research fields that are examined both fundamentally and application-oriented. In the imperial city of Goslar, scientists and engineers from 21 nations will meet from September 26th to 28th to exchange ideas about the diverse facets of Electrochemistry and the latest research results. In addition to topics such as corrosion, electrosynthesis, electroplating, sensors and batteries, the conference program also includes bioelectrochemistry, electrochemical analysis methods and process engineering, electrocatalysis and, last but not least, ionic liquids. The event is organized by six scientific societies under the leadership of the Electrochemistry division of the German Chemical Society (GDCh). For his work on electron transport through the interface between electrode and electrolyte in lithium-ion batteries, Dr. Heinz Bülter (28) in Goslar was awarded the advancement award in the field of Electrochemistry from the GDCh division . This boundary layer is a key component for the performance and safety of lithium-ion batteries. Bülter did his doctoral thesis on this topic at the University of Oldenburg. The work was created within the framework of the Graduate School Energy Storage and Electromobility Lower Saxony. Eight publications in which Bülter is named as the first author have already emerged from his research. All have been published in renowned specialist journals, including Angewandte Chemie. Further information at www.gdch.de/electrochemistry2016 The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with over 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the Electrochemistry division with currently 471 members. Every two years a conference takes place under the direction of the GDCh division Electrochemistry . For the fifth time it is an international conference at which the GDCh Analytical Chemistry division , the German Bunsen Society for Physical Chemistry, the Society for Chemical Technology and Biotechnology, the Working Group of Electrochemical Research Institutions, the Society for Corrosion Protection and the German Society for electroplating and surface technology.

43 Doing chemistry with light - International conference of photochemists in Jena - three awards

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August 31, 2016

Materials that react to light, catalysis with light, light-induced energy and electron transfers, industrially used Photochemistry , novel dyes, molecular light switches and the influence of light on biochemical processes - these are some of the topics at the 25th Lecture Conference on Photochemistry from 26. until September 28th in Jena. Organized by the Photochemistry division of the German Chemical Society (GDCh), this lecture conference has acquired an increasingly international character over the past few years. In addition, the most internationally recognized photochemists have been honored with the Theodor Förster Memorial Lecture since 1975. This year it is Professor Dr. Douglas C. Neckers, who worked at Bowling Green State University (Ohio) and founded the SpinOff company "Spectra Group". The Albert Weller Prize is awarded in Jena to two Germans who are currently doing their post-doctoral stays in Strasbourg with Nobel laureate Professor Dr. Jean-Marie Lehn or at Harvard University (Cambridge, USA): Dr. Martin Herder and Dr. Dominik Benjamin Bucher. Douglas C. Neckers was particularly fascinated by light as the smallest reagent in organic chemistry and polymer chemistry. With new photoinitiators he contributed to the great economic success of photopolymers. As director of the Center for Photochemical Sciences at Bowling Green University, he skilfully combined basic research with applied research and founded the "Spectra Group", which carries out contract research for industry and which Neckers is still in charge of today. What is now referred to as 3D printing is based on a technique that was essentially developed by Neckers, stereolithography, which is ultimately made possible through photopolymerization. Neckers is awarded the Theodor Förster Memorial Lecture for his ingenious basic research and the implementation of his applied research in industrial applications. In his lecture he deals with technology transfer in the photochemical sciences, in particular with photopolymerization and 3D printing, whereby he also refers to the successes of the German chemical industry at the end of the 19th and beginning of the 20th century, which are often successful Technology transfer was based, for example the barbiturates from Bayer, based on research by Emil Fischer, or the commercialization of ammonia synthesis at BASF, for which Fritz Haber laid the foundations. For Dominik Bucher and Martin Herder, both 31 years old, receiving the Albert Weller Prize is an important step on their upcoming career as scientists. Bucher caused a sensation with his doctoral thesis at the Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich, in which he used femtosecond vibrational spectroscopy to investigate DNA damage caused by UV radiation. He was able to show why less UV-induced damage occurs in double-stranded DNA than in single-stranded DNA, in particular by examining the processes of charge separation. Finally, he was able to clarify the mechanisms by which DNA repairs its damage on its own. Herder's dissertation, written at the Humboldt University in Berlin, is also considered a masterpiece from the perspective of international reviewers. During his doctorate, he worked on the design of improved photoswitches based on the diarylethene class of substances, investigating the structure-switching property relationships in more detail. In collaboration with physicists, he succeeded in realizing novel applications in photo-switchable transistors. During his work as a doctoral student, he contributed to a total of eleven scientific publications; he wrote three of them as first author. The first speaker in Jena, Professor Dr. Masahiro Irie from Rikkyo University in Tokyo, 2008 Förster Prize Winner, deals with the diarylethene family, which as photochromic molecules are very well suited for molecular light switches. He took a very close look at the light-induced build-up and breakage of bonds that takes place in the diarylethene crystals within picoseconds. These switching operations can be repeated over 10,000 times. Many lectures in Jena deal with photocatalysis, with artificial photosynthesis being an important topic. The first and most important step on the way to artificial photosynthesis, namely to obtain hydrogen by light-driven water splitting, has still not been solved satisfactorily. For example, Professor Dr. Vincent Artero from the University of Grenoble on his work on different photocathodes, on which the protons from the water molecules can be reduced to molecular hydrogen. Further information at www.gdch.de/photo2016 The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the Photochemistry division with currently 314 members. Her goals in the field of Photochemistry and its border areas are to promote the exchange of ideas among specialist colleagues and to convey technical suggestions, to maintain relationships with relevant organizations abroad, to anchor or strengthen subject-related teaching at universities and to encourage young scientists to promote.

42 17th German Fluortag with new research results - Fluorine, a chemical jack of all trades

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August 30, 2016

Fluorine is one of the most interesting elements in the chemical periodic table. And it is the only thing that a working group of the German Chemical Society (GDCh) has focused on. At its 17th German Fluorine Day from September 19 to 21 in Schmitten im Taunus, the Fluorine Chemistry Working Group will be showing the outstanding role that fluorine plays in very different compounds, from medicinal substances to extremely resistant plastics. Doctoral students and postdocs present their research at the conference . What makes Fluorine Chemistry so exciting and multifaceted is the fact that elemental fluorine can react with almost any element or molecule. Fluorinated compounds often have completely different properties compared to the fluorine-free parent compounds. The most thermally and chemically resistant polymers are fluorinated, just think of Teflon. Low molecular weight organic fluorine compounds serve as propellants and refrigerants. 40 percent of all agrochemicals and a quarter of all pharmaceuticals already contain fluorine atoms. Modern high-voltage and energy technology would be inconceivable without sulfur hexafluoride as the insulating gas. The presentations submitted for the 17th German Fluortag mainly deal with work from basic research, for example on new synthetic routes to organometallic fluorine compounds, with structural determinations of complex fluorine compounds or with the use of fluorine to elucidate reaction mechanisms in chemistry. The chemistry of the toxic and aggressive uranium fluorides - uranium hexafluoride is part of the nuclear fuel cycle - will also be addressed in two lectures. Contributions that can be attributed more to applied research include CO2 hydrogenation to methanol with fluoridated catalysts, the development of nano-metal fluoride-based composites for dental medical applications or the use of organotin fluorine compounds in dye solar cells. The three-day event is organized by Dr. Julia Bader from the working group of Professor Dr. Berthold Hoge, Bielefeld University. The conference by the chairman of the Fluorine Chemistry Working Group, Professor Dr. Peer Kirsch, Merck KGaA, Darmstadt. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. In addition to 28 specialist groups and sections, seven working groups are located under its roof: the working groups Fluorine Chemistry, Vocational Education, Chemistry in medical education Education, Chemistry and Society and Theoretical Chemistry (together with the German Bunsen Society for Physical Chemistry (DBG) and the German Physical Society ), Chemical Biology (together with the Society for Chemical Technology and Biotechnology (DECHEMA), the German Pharmaceutical Society and the Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology) and GeCats (German Society for Catalysis, together with DECHEMA, the VDI Society for Process Engineering and Chemical engineering, the DBG and the German Scientific Society for Petroleum, Natural Gas and Coal). The press release 42/16 as PDF for download.

41 Chemistry and society in dialogue - "The future of chemistry - Perspectives on the world of tomorrow"

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August 26, 2016

On September 30, 2016, the ?perspectives special?, Future Chemistry - Perspectives on the world of tomorrow, will take place in the Höchst industrial park. The event invites you to a dialogue between chemistry and society and asks what specific challenges society will face in the future and what contribution chemistry can make by 2030 to master the challenges. Specifically, three subject blocks deal with the importance of chemistry for medical progress, for the sustainable use of resources and the subject of energy and climate. In the Peter-Behrens-Bau in the Höchst industrial park, interdisciplinary discussion panels with renowned speakers will be on the program from 9 a.m. Interested parties can register for the event free of charge via the website www.infraserv.com/zukunft-chemie. The participants are invited to participate in the discussion and to use the event for networking. Host: German Chemical Society and Infraserv Höchst Chemistry needs a controversial dialogue with society about the future of Germany as a chemical and pharmaceutical location. The two organizers of this ?perspectives special? event are convinced of this: The hosts are the German Chemical Society (GDCh), whose working group ?Chemistry and Society? is discussing this topic intensively, as well as Infraserv Höchst, operating company of the Höchst industrial park and partner in site development for the chemical and pharmaceutical industry in Germany. Infraserv Höchst has opened its own ?perspectives? series of events, which has developed into a top event in the industry in Germany, for this special topic. In terms of content, the site developers were able to tie in with the book ?Future. Chemistry. ?, Which Infraserv Höchst and the Provadis University published on the occasion of the 150th anniversary of the Höchst industrial park in 2013 in the FAZ-Fachverlag. Invitation to a dialogue between chemistry and society In the historic Peter-Behrens-Bau, Professor Dr. Thisbe K. Lindhorst, President of the German Chemical Society, and the hosts Jürgen Vormann and Dr. Joachim Kreysing, Managing Director of Infraserv Höchst, presented the event. In her key note, Margret Suckale, Member of the Board of Management of BASF and President of the German Chemical Employers' Association, addresses the importance of the chemical industry as a driver of innovation and employment. Then there are three 90-minute discussion panels on the program, one after the other. Panel ?Diagnostics, Drugs and Therapies? In the first panel, Prof. Dr. Jochen Maas, Managing Director Research and Development at Sanofi, Prof. Dr. Theodor Dingermann, Senior Professor at the Institute for Pharmaceutical Biology at the Goethe University in Frankfurt, and Prof. Dr. Christiane Woopen, Managing Director of CERES and Head of the Ethics Research Center at the University of Cologne. The panel deals, among other things, with gene therapy as a possible mainstay of health care and health care, as well as the rising costs and risks that research companies are exposed to until their drugs are approved. Panel ?Sustainability and Product Development? The connection between sustainability and product development is the subject of the second panel with speakers Prof. Dr. Klaus Kümmerer, Professor of Sustainable Chemistry and Material Resources at Leuphana University Lüneburg, Dr. Steffi Ober, Sustainable Research Policy Officer at NABU Berlin, Prof. Dr. Armin Reller, holder of the chair for resource strategy at the University of Augsburg, and Dr. Martin Vollmer, Clariant's Chief Technology Officer. Under the keywords scarcity of resources and recycling, they shed light on how products can be developed that are planned from the outset with a view to recycling. Because the environmental impact of a product is largely determined in the planning phase. That is why you have to think in terms of life cycles, across the entire value chain. Panel: "Energy generation, conversion and storage" The third discussion round is devoted to energy generation, conversion and storage. If fossil fuels are to be completely replaced by renewable energies, technologies for conversion and storage must be improved. In doing so, however, the question of location must not be forgotten, after all, the energy transition should not lead to economic disadvantages for domestic industry. Prof. Dr. Ferdi Schüth, Director at the Max Planck Institute for Coal Research, Dr. Frank-Detlef Drake, Head of Research and Development at RWE, and Dr. Patrick Graichen, director of the Agora Energiewende initiative. The ?perspectives special? event promises controversial discussions and plenty of food for thought on the great challenges of our time. It invites science and politics, business and the public to reflect together in the context of research and innovation. A few remaining places are still available. Registration at www.infraserv.com/zukunft-chemie or by email to perspectives@infraserv.com. Press release 41/16 for download as a PDF.

40 convey chemistry alive - division> Chemical Education meets in Hannover

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17th August 2016

?Chemistry between experience and science? is the motto of the 33rd training and lecture division of the Chemical Education of the German Chemical Society (GDCh). From September 15 to 17, chemistry teachers and didactic chemists will meet with chemists from industry and the public service in Hanover to exchange information on all Chemical Education . On the occasion of the conference , the division awards two prizes for excellent teaching. The conference, which is approved as a training measure for chemistry teachers, is characterized by an extensive program that also contains a large number of practical and didactic offers. In addition to scientific specialist lectures, visitors can also expect discussion and experimental lectures as well as workshops in which new methods for modern Chemical Education are taught. In addition, this year, for the first time, young scientists will have the opportunity to present their research in short lectures as part of a young talent forum. The range of scientific lectures is wide. The three highly topical plenary lectures range from ?Regenerative Medicine? and ?Learning from (researcher's) biographies? to the topic ?Raw materials for future technologies - a challenge for chemistry too?. The discussion lectures also cover a wide range of chemical and chemistry-didactic topics. Among other things, it is about what contribution Food Chemistry can make to school lessons and how digital learning in chemistry and the use of new media in teacher training can be designed. In addition, it will be discussed how simple chemical experiments on current research topics can be carried out without hazardous substances. At the experimental lectures, visitors can expect experiments from the areas of plastics, Chemistry and Energy, nano and Food Chemistry chemistry, for example. Two lectures will also show which, sometimes unexpected, materials can be used for experimental lessons. The nine workshops that are being held together with experts from the GDCh teacher training centers and other specialists are of particular interest this year. From simple experiments for first-time chemistry classes to the decomposition of hydrogen peroxide - here visitors can try out what is suitable for their classes. Prize winners of the division The GDCh division Chemical Education teaching awards two prizes on the occasion of the conference . Waltraud Habelitz-Tkotz, Emil-von-Behring-Gymnasium, Spardorf, received the Heinrich Roessler Prize, endowed with 4,000 euros and donated by Degussa (now Evonik), for her great commitment to attractive, innovative and contemporary Chemical Education. In addition to her teaching, with which she inspires young people for chemistry, she designs future-oriented content in curriculum committees and brings her didactic experience and specialist knowledge to working groups and subject-oriented committees. She is particularly interested in the cooperation between schools, academies and universities in subject-related didactic projects. In addition, Habelitz-Tkotz is a member of the GDCh commission for teacher training. Dr. Bernd-H. Brand is awarded the Friedrich Stromeyer Prize, endowed by the Merck company and endowed with 3,000 euros, for his special achievements in promoting chemistry teaching in schools. He developed and optimized an abundance of chemical school experiments, which he presented not only in his own lessons, but also in advanced training events and didactic publications. The so-called ?fire script? with instructions for the use of medical devices in school experiments is now a standard manual in many chemistry collections. With ?CHEmac-win?, Brand also developed a hazardous substance database for schools. Further information at www.gdch.de/fgcu2016. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It has 28 sections and sections, including the division of Chemical Education with about 1,900 members. Chemistry teacher, high school teacher and chemists from industry and the public sector have joined forces in the division of Chemical Education a competent forum for all issues that affect the chemistry in teaching, teaching, training and further education. The press release 40/16 as PDF for download.

39 Layered materials: You can never get thinner - 2D materials in the focus of a scientific conference

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August 16, 2016

Why shouldn't a division of the German Chemical Society (GDCh) hold its conference in a neighboring country? The Solid-State Chemistry and Materials Research Research division is doing this this year and meets at the place of work of its board member Professor Dr. Hubert Huppertz, at the University of Innsbruck. The conference will take place from September 19 to 21 under the motto "Thick and thin: multi-faceted properties of layered materials". The main focus is on the synthesis and properties of very thin layer materials. The highlights of the conference include the awarding of the HC Starck doctoral award and the first award with the Rudolf Hoppe lecture. In addition to German and Austrian speakers, US scientists will also present their research work on ultra-thin coatings, which are required, for example, for the increasingly smaller electronic or optoelectronic components, for sensors or in catalysis. In the past ten years, two-dimensional (2D) materials have become the focus of research interests of many solid-state chemists, i.e. materials that consist of just a single layer of atoms. These thinnest possible layers have completely different, often completely new physical properties than chemically identical, but multi-atomic materials. For Professor Dr. Joshua Goldberger from Ohio State University in Columbus is opening up a creative new field of research; namely, the coatings can be chemically functionalized with 2D materials, so that new types of surface properties can be achieved. What this will mean for the future of electronics, for example, cannot be foreseen at the current state of basic research. The best-known 2D material is graphene, a modification of carbon. If you mentally layer several graphite layers on top of each other, you arrive at graphite with completely different physical properties. In fact, graphene was initially extracted mechanically by peeling off (exfoliating) the graphite layer by layer. Goldberger still uses this process, albeit with completely different materials, which he converts into germanium or tin-containing graphane analogues. These 2-D layers are similar to those of graphane that is obtained when graphene is chemically reacted with hydrogen. In contrast to graphene, graphane is an electrical insulator. It will be interesting to see what developments and new applications the large expected family of graphane analogues will bring with it. The recipient of the Rudolf Hoppe Lecture, Professor Dr. Tom Nilges, at the Technical University of Munich, is also researching candidates for thin-film applications in the semiconductor industry, for optoelectronic components and sensors. Its monolayers consist of phosphorus, which he synthesizes from black phosphorus, a modification of red phosphorus. These layers acquire new properties when the phosphorus is partially replaced by arsenic. In his most recent research area, Nilges deals with solid-state ion conductors and active materials for batteries. One of the two HC Starck doctoral award winners, Dr. Martin Oschatz, currently Postdoc at the University of Utrecht, tries to solve problems with electrochemical energy storage in batteries in order to contribute to the more efficient use of alternative energy sources. The materials he investigated for this purpose consist of nanoporous carbon, which can prove to be an important component for electrodes. So-called carbide-derived carbons (CDCs) are particularly promising, as they can cover a surface area of almost 3,000 square meters per gram. The specific capacity of lithium-sulfur batteries could be increased significantly. The second recipient of the HC Starck doctoral award is Dr. Martin Heise from the Technical University of Dresden, who dealt with the synthesis of intermetallic compounds in his dissertation. These substances consist of at least two metallic elements that can be present as disordered alloys (solid solutions) or as ordered phases. Their crystal structures are different from those of the elements that make them up. These materials play an important role in catalysts, hydrogen storage systems, permanent magnets, thermoelectrics, superconductors and shape memory materials. Further information at www.gdch.de/fmf2016. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the Solid-State Chemistry and Materials Research division with currently 884 members. The division is a competent forum for questions from the inorganic Materials Science in research, application and teaching. The division awards the doctoral prize donated by the HC Starck company, endowed with 5,000 euros. The division is donating 1,000 euros in prize money for the Rudolf Hoppe lecture. Rudolf Hoppe was a well-known inorganic chemist who researched and taught at the University of Giessen. Press release 39/16 for download as a PDF.

38 contemporary witnesses report from the chemical industry - plastics, environmental protection and process development

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15th August 2016

The industrial division of the History of Chemistry of the German Chemical Society (GDCh), is holding this year's eyewitness conference on September 15 and 16, 2016 in Hanover at TÜV NORD AG. As with the previous twelve successful events, it was again possible to gain contemporary witnesses who report on the development of the chemical industry in recent decades, especially in Germany. A total of 19 contributions were submitted. Professor Dr. Dietrich Braun, former Head of the German Plastics Institute in Darmstadt for many years, gives an overview of the upheavals affecting practically all areas of life that were and are associated with the development of plastics. Braun started the age of plastics around 1840, when Charles Goodyear discovered the vulcanization of rubber. Due to constant improvements in polymer materials and materials, the end of the age of plastics is not in sight. Dr. Claus Christ reports on the regulatory and technical development of environmental protection at Hoechst AG and its predecessor companies, starting with the first internal "instructions" in the late 19th century through to modern environmental protection legislation and its effects on the economy and industry policy in Germany. Above all, the environmental activities in the various plants after the company was founded in 1951 are specifically described. As one of the "fathers" of the organic compound, Professor Dr. Egon Fanghänel describes the genesis of the famous textbook from 1958, which, with 450,000 copies sold, became one of the most successful academic textbooks in organic chemistry. And as a textbook for synthetically working chemists - also in industry - but above all for the bachelor's degree, ?Das Organikum? continues to have its raison d'etre. It has so far been translated into eleven languages. Dr. Egbert Gritz provides information on the history and current status of the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis, which was developed in Germany to obtain liquid hydrocarbons, especially gasoline, from coal. The first patent was granted to the two researchers, Franz Fischer and Hans Tropsch, in 1925. Ten years later, large-scale production was possible after high-performance catalysts could be developed. When sufficient crude oil was available in West Germany after the war, the Fischer-Tropsch synthesis was no longer competitive here. In South Africa, however, a decision was made in favor of this process, which started in Sasolburg in 1955. Gritz was temporarily active in catalyst research at Sasol in South Africa. The chemist Dr. Klaus-D. As the former chairman of the board of TÜV Nord AG, Röker gives an overview of the history of the technical inspection associations from the steam boiler inspection from the middle of the 19th century to today's security service providers. In a second lecture, he reports on the progress that has been made with the introduction of computer-aided processes (CAD, CAE, FEM) in the development of vehicle tires and - instead of empirical methods - today enables the end product to be designed precisely. Further information at www.gdch.de/chemiegeschichte. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the History of Chemistry division . The industrial group of the division aims to give the history of the chemical industry and technology a higher priority. The press release 38/16 as PDF for download.

37 News from Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy - Clarifying Biochemical and Molecular Biological Questions

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August 12, 2016

The division for Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy Spectroscopy of the German Chemical Society (GDCh) meets for its 38th FGMR Discussion Meeting from September 12 to 15, 2016 at the Heinrich Heine University in Düsseldorf. The conference will open with the Felix Bloch Lecture, an award that will be presented for the second time this year. On the second day of the conference, the Ernst Awards will be presented to three young scientists for the 20th time. The Felix Bloch Lecture is named after one of the two founders of magnetic resonance spectroscopy - also known as nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy or NMR Spectroscopy . In 1952 he received the Nobel Prize in Physics for the discovery of nuclear magnetic resonance. Richard Ernst, who set an important milestone in the further development of NMR Spectroscopy , received the 1991 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for this. Felix Bloch Lecturer this year is Dr. Björn Corzilius from the Goethe University in Frankfurt. The Ernst Awards are presented to Christian Hintze (University of Konstanz), Katharina Märker (University of Grenoble) and Johannes Wittmann (University of Frankfurt and ETH Zurich). NMR Spectroscopy is based on a resonant interaction between the magnetic moment of atomic nuclei in a sample and an external magnetic field. This resonance can be determined with the help of high-frequency alternating magnetic fields. This method can only access isotopes that have a nuclear spin and thus a magnetic moment in the ground state, such as 1 H, 13 C, 15 N, 19 F, 31 P, 2 D, 6 Li or 17 O. This method is used it is possible to obtain information about the chemical environment of the atoms, about the structure of the corresponding molecules and the movements of the corresponding molecules in the seconds to nanoseconds range. With the help of magnetic field gradients, the nuclear magnetic resonance method is also used for imaging, for example in medical diagnostics. Electron spin resonance (EPR), in which the magnetic moment of electron spins is used, is based on the same physical principles. This method examines samples that contain unpaired electrons, such as stable organic radicals or transition metals. With the help of resonant microwaves, the environment, dynamics and distances between different electron spins, including structures and spatial and structural changes, can be determined. The lectures at the Düsseldorf conference deal with the application of both methods to current issues in medicinal chemistry, Biochemistry or solid-state chemistry. Among other things, studies on conformational changes, i.e. changes in the spatial structure of proteins, which is important for molecular biological processes, are presented. This involves, for example, protein folding disorders in various protein misfolding diseases, including Alzheimer's disease or type II diabetes, binding studies on DNA and a better understanding of enzymatic reactions or processes on biological membranes. Björn Corzilius, who was awarded the Felix Bloch lecture, presented methodical advances in dynamic nuclear polarization (DNP) in 13 C and 15 N NMR Spectroscopy . With this method it is possible to transfer the polarization of electron spins to the nuclear spin and to increase the sensitivity of the measurements by two orders of magnitude. Ernst Prize winner Katharina Märker used this technique of signal amplification in her award-winning work "A new tool for NMR Crystallography: Complete 13 C / 15 N assignment of organic molecules at natural isotopic abundance using DNP-enhanced solid-state NMR". Because this made it possible to clearly assign the resonances in the molecules, she achieved a major breakthrough in the structure elucidation of crystalline organic substances. Johannes Wittmann deals with the improvement of radio frequency pulse sequences for recording multidimensional NMR spectra. In his theoretically oriented work "Quantification and compensation of the influence of pulse transients on symmetry-based recoupling sequences" he calculated the effects of pulse imperfections on different pulse sequences and examined three approaches to compensate for these effects with the aim of improving the reproducibility of NMR experiments increase significantly. Christian Hintze's work "Laser-induced magnetic dipole spectroscopy" introduces a new method of pulsed EPR Spectroscopy : Instead of determining the distance between two stable radicals (electron spins) as before, this method uses one of the two electronic, magnetic moments generated during the experiment by a laser pulse, which in this case excites a porphyrin residue into a triplet state. Further information at: http://www.fknmr.hhu.de/fgmr-2016/fgmr-discussion-meeting-2016.html The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the division Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy with currently 471 members. The activities of the division include the annual discussion conference with contributions from all fields of magnetic resonance, various training and information events offered by the GDCh, as well as several special events that are organized by active members on special topics. The press release can be downloaded as a PDF.

36 Sustainable Chemistry - leaving as few traces as possible

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August 10, 2016

The aim of sustainable chemistry is to use resources without harming the earth or its inhabitants, either now or in the future. This usually only works in small steps; because ultimately all products that humans manufacture are based on raw materials and mostly from those that are irretrievably lost after use. Just think of oil. In the Sustainable Chemistry division of the German Chemical Society (GDCh), scientists regularly exchange ideas on how to conserve resources, how products can be manufactured or recycled in a more environmentally friendly way and leave as few traces as possible in the environment after use. The next exchange of ideas will take place at the annual meeting of the division from September 19 to 21, 2016 in Karlsruhe. "Benign by Design" is an interdisciplinary, solution-oriented concept developed by the chemist Professor Dr. Klaus Kümmerer, Leuphana University Lüneburg. Loosely translated as "environmentally friendly from the start", it aims to reduce environmental pollution through targeted molecular design, ie, in the early phase of chemical and drug development, the biodegradability of the substances is included in the planning. This applies to all substances that get into the environment during or after their use, including pesticides or detergents, but also for substances that escape into the environment from plastics, textiles, house facades or electronic devices, for example. Kümmerer explains this concept in Karlsruhe, where he demands that complex materials should be put together as simply as possible and that the individual components should be easy to separate from one another so that they can be reused or recycled. In Karlsruhe, further lectures will show concrete examples of successful product and process development. Laundry detergents and cleaning agents have become significantly more environmentally friendly in the last few decades, and their ingredients are increasingly based on renewable raw materials. Research and development continue to aim for even more sustainable production and products without reducing their quality. This applies, for example, to surfactants, in which the petroleum-based synthetic ones are increasingly being replaced by bio-based substances. One example is the sophorolipids, which can now be obtained biotechnologically from vegetable oils, ie in a fermentation process using certain yeasts and with the help of subsequent purification processes. These bio-surfactants have unique, highly complex chemical structures that can be modified and optimized with regard to foam formation and effective fat removal, among other things. These so-called structure-activity relationships of the sophorolipids as well as the entire production process of this bio-surfactant class are presented by Dr. Dirk Kuppert from Evonik Nutrition & Care GmbH, Hanau. At the Fraunhofer Institute for Wood Research (Fraunhofer WKI, Braunschweig) the aim is to replace acrylate or methacrylate polymers, which are contained, among other things, as UV-curing carrier resins in coatings, printer inks, adhesives or materials for 3D printing, with polymer systems that have a lower have allergenic potential and less volatile components. The focus of the research is on itaconic acid, an organic dicarboxylic acid that is produced biotechnologically, for example by fermenting molasses and using the fungus strain Aspergillus Itaconicus. Here, too, they want to go the way from crude oil to renewable raw materials and are currently testing the suitability of bio-based polyester itaconates, which Dr. Tobias Robert reports. Lignin, a major component of wood, is the largest natural source of aromatic hydrocarbons. The fact that these have been obtained mainly from crude oil for decades is due to the fact that lignin is difficult to digest chemically. Therefore, in many places, suitable processes are being worked on to chemically or enzymatically break down lignin into its aromatic components. A base-catalyzed process for the depolymerization of the phenolic macromolecules of lignin, developed at the Fraunhofer Institute for Chemical Technology, Pfinztal, is currently being tested on a pilot scale at the Fraunhofer Center for Chemical-Biotechnological Processes in Leuna. Depending on the process conditions, low molecular weight alkylphenols are formed. After further processing, the monomeric constituents are obtained in an oil-like fraction and the oligomers as a solid fraction. The process is currently being optimized in terms of material and energy efficiency, as Dr. Daniela Pufky-Heinrich explains. Other lectures in Karlsruhe will deal with new catalytic processes, for example, to make simple hydrocarbons such as methane accessible for organic synthesis, with storage technologies for electricity from wind or solar systems and with circular economy. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the Sustainable Chemistry division , which was founded in 2009 and has over 400 members. The division emerged from a working group of the same name. The chairman of the division is Professor Dr. Michael Meier, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology. Further information on the conference at www.gdch.de/nachhaltig2016. The press release 36/16 as PDF for download.

35 gold goes to Ben Feringa from the Netherlands - German Chemical Society presents award in Seville

35/16
August 03, 2016

The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is taking the 6th EuCheMS Chemistry Congress from September 11 to 15, 2016 in Seville as an opportunity to award the August Wilhelm von Hofmann medal. This gold coin is primarily awarded to foreign chemists who have made special contributions to chemistry. That applies to Professor Dr. Ben Feringa, University of Groningen, who can show fascinating work on dynamic molecular systems. So he developed the first light-driven molecular motor. This year's congress of the European Association for Chemical and Molecular Sciences is concluded with the award from the GDCh and Feringa's plenary lecture ?From Molecules to Dynamic Molecular Systems?. Feringa's research achievements range from fundamental contributions to modern stereochemistry and organic synthesis to notable new approaches in the rapidly evolving field of molecular nanotechnology and dynamic molecular systems such as molecular switches and rotating molecular motors that power nanomachines and nanorobots. His creativity, coupled with great experimental skills, has inspired many scientists to new approaches in the field of complex chemical systems. Molecular switches that were developed in Feringa's research group can be found in responsive materials and surfaces in which, for example, mechanical loads can lead to defined processes at the molecular level or a mechanical reaction can be triggered chemically. Liquid crystals and electrochromic components for optoelectronics, certain gels, polymers and catalysts are just as much a part of this as light-switchable protein channels for nanoscale drug release and applications in photopharmacology. Light-responsive active ingredients are used here in cancer treatment, in treatment with antibiotics and against the formation of biofilms. The proof that molecular motors can be coupled to the macroscopic world via certain surface properties was considered a milestone in chemistry. About five years ago, a molecular nano-car caused a sensation. Ben Feringa studied chemistry at the University of Groningen from 1969, then went on to research at Shell in Amsterdam and Sittingbourne (GB), then became a professor at the University of Groningen, where he was appointed professor of Organic Chemistry in 1988. He has received multiple awards and has numerous roles in the chemical community. The European Association for Chemical and Molecular Sciences is the successor organization to the FECS (Federation of European Chemical Societies), which was founded in 1970 with the major contribution of the GDCh. EuCheMS currently has 46 chemical science societies in 36 countries as members, including the GDCh as the largest continental European chemical society with over 31,000 members - that is almost 20 percent of the chemists represented by EuCheMS. The scientific activities of EuCheMS, in particular conferences, network building, etc., are primarily carried out by the relevant divisions and working parties. However, the focus is on the EuCheMS Chemistry Congress, which takes place every two years.

34 Paints yesterday, today, tomorrow - ever more compatible with the environment and health

34/16
2nd August 2016

This year, the 80th paint conference of the paint Coating Chemistry division of the German Chemical Society (GDCh) will take place in Paderborn from September 14 to 16. The organizers gave the conference the motto "Coating Chemistry - Back to the future" because a journey through time is planned: What were the driving forces and influencing factors for paint development in the past? What solutions are being pursued today? What challenges need to be addressed tomorrow? These questions are to be discussed in the subject areas of pigments, binders, additives and application techniques. A thematic example is the development from solvent-based to water-based paints, which began about 30 years ago for toxicological and ecological reasons. A problem that is difficult to solve was and is the change in the flow behavior of the paint; because there are special flow properties such as thixotropy, i.e. a decrease in viscosity when stirring, or flow limits at which a paint changes from an elastic to a liquid state. Yield point and thixotropy influence important material properties such as flow and run-off behavior, but also storage stability. Only a precise knowledge and control of the rheological behavior of a paint enables consistent products of high quality. Another lecture will show why clear coats are not always clear. The optical properties are caused and influenced by mixtures (blends) of different acrylate dispersions, especially in the case of industrial coatings. Clear lacquer films, which are formed through drying and polymerisation, depend heavily on the blend components. For example, too great a difference in the refractive index of the components can lead to light scattering, which makes the film appear cloudy. As could be demonstrated with the aid of laser scanning microscopy, inhomogeneities that cause the cloudiness arise during the "filming" of the different binders. On the basis of these microscopic analyzes, an attempt is now made to take suitable measures to better avoid cloudiness in the future. It applies to all coatings that pigments and fillers must be well wetted and dispersed. This improves coloristic properties such as color strength, transparency and hiding power, as well as material properties such as processing viscosity. This is achieved through wetting and dispersing additives. In Paderborn, their development is historically traced, now and in the future the demands on these additives are increasing with regard to the coloristic ?performance?, but also because of the harmlessness to health and the environment. Articles about ionic liquids and Nanomaterials as conductivity additives for paints and varnishes, about novel fluorescent pigments for innovative UV protection of coatings or about wall paints with aluminum pigments, which reflect about 50 percent of the heat radiation back into the room and thus the heating costs, are mainly directed towards the future reduce. The aim here is to conceal the metallic character of these pigments. Details about the conference and the program can be found at www.gdch.de/lacktagung2016. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the paint Coating Chemistry division with almost 500 members. The division sees its tasks in the active promotion of science and research in the field of coating materials and pigments and associated raw materials, products and technologies as well as in the cooperation in technical and political issues of European and German legislation. Press release 34/16 for download as a PDF.

33 Another high award for Klaus Müllen - Hermann Staudinger Prize for graphene polymer chemistry

33/16
July 27, 2016

On September 11, 2016, Professor Dr. Drs. Hc Klaus Müllen, Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Mainz, was awarded the Hermann Staudinger Prize of the German Chemical Society (GDCh). The award will take place on the occasion of the international conference of the GDCh division Macromolecular Chemistry from September 11th to 13th in Halle / Saale. The conference under the motto "Polymers: from structure to function" is thematically focused on the molecular organization within the polymers, namely the functional self-assembly. The first speakers will be Klaus Müllen and the two Reimund Stadler Prize winners 2016, the young scientists Dr. Michael Sommer, Freiburg, and Dr. Frederik Roman Wurm, Mainz. Müllen (69), director at the MPI for Polymer Research since 1989, studied chemistry in Cologne, where he was born, did his doctorate at the University of Basel, completed his habilitation at the ETH Zurich and came to the MPI for Polymer Research there via professorships at the Universities of Cologne and Mainz. In addition to his two honorary doctorates, guest and honorary professorships have taken him to Osaka, Shanghai, Jerusalem, Leuven, Cambridge, Rennes, St. Louis, Changchun, Gainesville, Montreal, Evanston, Calgary, Bordeaux, Beijing, Pittsburgh, Marseille, Shanghai and Singapore. Well over 20 other awards include the Max Planck Research Award (1993), the Philip Morris Research Award (1997), the ACS Award in Polymer Science (2011) and the Adolf von Baeyer Medal of the GDCh (2013 ). Müllen receives the Hermann Staudinger Prize of the GDCh in recognition of his pioneering work on the synthesis of unconventional polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons and 2D macromolecules for electronic components as well as in recognition of his outstanding personal commitment to the field of macromolecular chemistry. Carbon materials for information and energy technology In his lecture, Müllen will present his polymer chemistry of graphene and graphene nanoribbons (GNRs). The latter are strips of graphene with a diameter of less than 50 nanometers and a quasi-one-dimensional structure. These structures can be of great practical importance, but because they could not yet be precisely determined structurally, they are often dismissed as "black stuff", as soot. On the other hand, the two newcomers to the carbon family are widely touted as multifunctional wonder materials and as a rich playground for physicists. Müllen also believes in the future of these materials for energy technology, namely for a new generation of semiconductors in order to further miniaturize printed circuits and to be able to better influence the conduction band structures compared to conventional conjugated polymers. These goals represent major challenges for material synthesis, which Müllen and his team have taken on. They have broken new ground for both graph and GNR production. This synthetic breakthrough in basic research will lead Materials Science into a new future, Müllen is certain, who dares to make predictions about the future in his lecture. The Reimund Stadler Prize winners Michael Sommer and Frederik H. Wurm Michael Sommer (37), habilitation student and junior research group leader at the Institute for Macromolecular Chemistry at the University of Freiburg, also deals with graphene, with composites made of graphene and conjugated polymers for applications in batteries, supercapacitors and thermoelectric components. Sommer's focus is on conjugated polymers. Here, too, he is looking for efficient, simple and inexpensive synthesis processes and researches structure-functionality relationships for electronic components that are based on organic materials. He presents the success of his research work in his award lecture. The second Reimund Stadler award winner, Frederik R. Wurm (35), is group leader at the MPI for Polymer Research in Mainz. Like Sommer, he has already received numerous awards and can present a long list of publications. In his work, however, he deals with completely different chemical substance classes, which he sees in his basic research as more suitable for applications in the biological field, for example for the production of artificial tissue or for water-soluble protein-based therapeutics. As a polymer chemist, he tries to develop precise synthetic chemistry to influence the interactions of synthetic material with biomolecules and bio-surfaces. The focus of his research interests are polyphosphoric esters. The conference in the burning glass The conference touches on all current research areas in macromolecular chemistry, including, for example, nanoscale metal-containing supramolecules, catalysis in polyurethane chemistry, fiber-reinforced plastics or graphene materials for fuel cell catalysis. The chairman of the organizing committee is Professor Dr. Wolfgang H. Binder from the Institute for Chemistry at the University of Halle. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the Macromolecular Chemistry division with almost 1,200 members. The division was founded 66 years ago. It brings together scientists from universities, research institutes and industry, from all areas of polymer chemistry and physics, from functional materials, engineering plastics, biopolymers and biomaterials to nanoscale polymer systems for Medicine, electronics and optics. The division Reimund Stadler Prize is endowed with 5,000 euros. The Macromolecular Chemistry division has the right to propose the Hermann Staudinger Prize of the GDCh, named after the 1953 Nobel Prize in Chemistry and endowed with 7,500 euros. Press release 33/16 as a PDF for download.

32 Food under the scientific microscope - consumers expect authenticity and reliable labeling

32/16
July 26, 2016

When the German Food Chemists' Day 2016 is held in Freising-Weihenstephan in Upper Bavaria from September 14 to 16, the German Purity Law, which has now been in place for 500 years, will of course also be discussed. The Food Chemistry Society, the organizer of the conference, does not want to look back, but rather to ask whether it can be proven with certainty that a beer was brewed using traditional methods. Food analysis is in demand here, the latest developments and applications of which are presented and discussed, for example with reference to aroma research, which is a thematic focus of the conference . In Germany, only water, barley malt, hops and yeast may be used for the production of bottom-fermented beer, and malt from other types of grain (except rice, maize and dari) for top-fermented beer. Carbon dioxide and nitrogen may also be added, as well as sugar in the case of top-fermented beer. Outside of Germany, Additives and malt substitutes are often used. If these beers are called beer in the country of manufacture, this designation may also be adopted in Germany, provided that the ingredients contained are identified in the list of ingredients. Because it is important for many consumers in Germany to consume traditional, organically produced products from the region, the official Food monitoring in this case has to meet the challenge of clearly demonstrating the authenticity of the beer. By adapting the method of nuclear magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR Spectroscopy), food analysts are now able to detect deviations from the declaration with very little effort and in a short time. Ingredients that determine the quality of the beer can also be quantified. Consumers also expect authenticity when it comes to taste. The enjoyment often increases when an authentic taste experience is perceived. Natural Flavorings extracts and foods with flavoring properties shape the taste. The origin of the raw materials used plays a role here, but processing or maturing processes are also decisive for quality. For the food industry, for example, it is a challenge to maintain sensory authenticity despite the natural fluctuations that a globally networked agriculture and Food industry brings with it. An EU-wide regulation tries to prevent consumers from being misled with regard to the actual origin of natural flavors. The official monitoring of flavors shows, however, that the legal regulations have various inaccuracies and definition gaps. In addition, violations by food manufacturers against this regulation cannot yet be analytically recorded in many cases. An objective assessment suffers from such ineffective controls, which is equally unsatisfactory for flavor and food manufacturers, for trade laboratories and official controls. In Freising-Weihenstephan there is a discussion about the consequences of this. At this year's German Food Chemists Day, around 500 food chemists from science, monitoring and industry will discuss 27 lectures and around 200 poster contributions. Other important topics will be modern biotechnological manufacturing processes, residue analysis, bioactive food ingredients as well as the free trade agreement TTIP and "Glyphosate & Co". Further information on the conference at www.gdch.de/lchtag2016. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the Food Chemistry Society, whose task it is to promote the exchange of ideas in the field of Food Chemistry and its related disciplines and to provide technical suggestions. With 2,900 members, the Food Chemistry Society is the largest division in the GDCh. The press release 32/16 as PDF for download.

31 Between polymer research and nanosciences - Liebig commemorative coin goes to Markus Antonietti

31/16
20th July, 2016

From 9 to 12 September 2016, Greifswald will host the 129th meeting of the Society of German Natural Scientists and Doctors (GDNÄ). It is a good tradition that the German Chemical Society (GDCh) participates in these meetings, which take place every two years, with a scientific session and a subsequent festive event. With the Liebig commemorative coin of the GDCh, Professor Dr. Markus Antonietti from the Max Planck Institute for Colloids and Interfaces in Potsdam honored. The GDCh recognizes Antonietti's groundbreaking work in the interface between polymer research and nanosciences. The creative exceptional researcher has opened up new fields of application in chemical energy storage and sustainable chemistry. In addition, his work has influenced numerous other scientific and technical disciplines. Antonietti, born in Mainz in 1960, studied chemistry in his hometown and began his Career as a polymer scientist with a physico-chemical focus. During his habilitation on microgels with a special structure, he was the first ever to also deal with nanogels. At the end of the 1980s, around 20 years before research into nanoparticles was established, he recognized the peculiarities of polymer Nanomaterials. One of Antonietti's trademarks is that he repeatedly realigned the focus of his research work. He worked very successfully on the self-organization of block copolymers, on polyelectrolytes and amphiphilic polymers. In 1993 he became the youngest director of the Max Planck Society. Scientifically, he turned to the crystal growth of polymers, biomimetic mineralization and mesocrystalline structures and included inorganic Nanomaterials in his research, using polymeric ionic liquids as the reaction medium. About ten years ago carbon became the focus of his interest - from the design of carbon nanostructures to "hydrothermal carbonization", the artificial production of lignite or liquid petroleum precursors from biomass, one of Antonietti's contributions to chemical energy storage that he is working on added to other energy sources. His contributions to artificial photosynthesis and the chemical use of carbon dioxide in general are noteworthy. Antonietti's work has already received several awards, including two honorary doctorates and three honorary professorships. The laudation for the new bearer of the Liebig Memorial Medal will be given by Professor Dr. Robert Schlögl, Director at the Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society, Berlin, and at the Max Planck Institute for Chemical Energy Conversion, Mülheim / Ruhr. Schlögl has also organized the chemistry session for the GDCh at this year's GDNÄ meeting and leads through this event, at which the topics ?Steel: How an old material reinvents itself again and again and thus inspires science and economy?, ?Ammonia: How an epoch-making invention that changed people's lives and the work of chemists ?and highlighted? New Molecules and Materials for Medicine?. The German Chemical Society , with over 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies worldwide. It awards numerous internationally renowned prizes, including the Liebig commemorative coin, which was first awarded in 1903. The 67 winners so far include numerous later Nobel Prize winners: Adolf von Baeyer, Paul Ehrlich, Fritz Haber, Carl Bosch, Max Planck, Friedrich Bergius, Hans Fischer, Feodor Lynen, Karl Ziegler and Gerhard Ertl.

30 Many substances - high risk ?: Relevance of (trace) substances for people and the environment

30/16
July 14, 2016

Environmental chemists and ecotoxicologists from the German Chemical Society (GDCh) and the Society of Environmental Toxicology and Chemistry - German Language Branch (SETAC GLB) will meet for their annual conference in Tübingen from September 5 to 8, 2016. The focus of the discussion is the question of how relevant micropollutants are for humans and the environment. On the occasion of this conference , the GDCh division Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology awards the Paul Crutzen Prize for outstanding scientific work in the field of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology. Trace substances such as Pesticides, pharmaceuticals or industrial chemicals are widespread in the environment today. The continuous increase in the global production of chemicals results in a steadily growing number of compounds in the environment. Critical voices ask whether the diversity of trace substances in surface waters does not already exceed the biodiversity. The great variety of substances and the wide range of concentrations represent a major challenge for chemical analysis. In order to be able to detect substances in low concentration ranges, a combination of adapted strategies for sampling and highly sensitive and selective measuring technology is necessary. For a comprehensive assessment of trace substances, it is also necessary to know their mechanism of action. The combination of exposure and impact analysis serves to comprehensively investigate the risk of trace substances for humans and the environment. The investigation of the biological effects of mixtures of various, numerous substances at low concentrations plays an important role in ecotoxicological research. The scientists also exchange ideas about the latest possibilities of being able to better remove trace substances, for example in wastewater treatment, so that they no longer get into the environment in the future or are at least effectively kept away from drinking water. Contrary environmental-chemical and ecotoxicological facets show carbon-like materials including biochar in the environment, which is still not fully understood today. On the one hand, they represent pollutant and possibly climate-relevant carbon sources; on the other hand, pollutants can be so strongly bound to the materials (soot, charcoal, hard coal) that under certain conditions this could even be considered as a remediation strategy. These carbon sources are also considered to be hardly reactive with regard to the formation of carbon dioxide. Another current topic of the conference is the occurrence of microplastics in the environment. How much microplastic do we find in our waters? How can we reliably prove it? What effects can microplastics have on aquatic organisms? These are some of the questions that academics, industry and government will address at their conference . As part of the conference , the GDCh division Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology award the Paul Crutzen Prize to Dr. Tuhsar Rastogi from Leuphana University Lüneburg. Rastogi received this award for his publication ?Redesigning of existing pharmaceuticals for enhanced biodegradability?, which appeared in the well-known journal Environmental Science and Technology last year. In this work, Rastogi used an active pharmaceutical ingredient to show how the degradability in the environment can be improved by skillful changes to the structure and the desired therapeutic effect can still be maintained. This would be one way of avoiding the occurrence of drug residues in the environment in the future. Further information on the conference at www.setac-glb.de The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with over 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the division Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology. It deals with the fate of chemicals in the environment as well as their entry routes, their distribution and their transformation in the compartments Soil, water and air (Environmental Chemistry) and their effect on organisms and habitats (ecotoxicology). The division is strongly interdisciplinary and offers a common platform for chemists, biologists, geoscientists, lawyers, engineers and scientists from other related disciplines. The Paul Crutzen Prize is named after the 1995 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Professor Dr. Paul J. Crutzen, who was honored for his work on exploring the ozone hole. The press release 30/16 as PDF for download.

29 New website “Studying Chemistry” online - comprehensive information for prospective students

29/16
July 7, 2016

To assist graduates and other interested parties in the decision to study chemistry, the German Chemical Society (GDCh) has now launched a new website: On www.chemie-studieren.de comprehensive information can be found around the chemistry studies in Germany. The website replaces the previous brochure entitled ?Studying Chemistry? and provides helpful facts and tips in a contemporary format. There are exciting career opportunities opening up for chemists. They have their finger on the pulse and through their research try to answer future questions on topics such as energy, mobility, new materials, nutrition and health. However, the variety of training opportunities and subjects presents prospective students with the first challenge. The new website ?Studying Chemistry? gives an overview of the diverse world of chemistry. The structure of a chemistry course with all possible types of degrees is presented in detail and the differences between courses at universities and colleges for applied sciences are explained. Under the heading ?Universities in the vicinity? you will find the contact details, academic advisors and websites of all universities, universities of applied sciences and universities of teacher education in Germany that offer courses in chemistry. ?Studying Chemistry? introduces numerous subject areas within chemistry, with a focus on a brief description of the subject area, the course of studies in the subject area and the professional opportunities after graduation. In addition, chemists give first-hand insights into studies and professional life in field reports. Further information can also be found on the subjects of studying abroad, internships, additional qualifications, school-based and dual training in chemistry. References to other interesting and advanced websites on everything to do with chemistry round off the information offered. Images are available at www.gdch.de/presse. With over 31,000 members, the GDCh is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It promotes science, especially chemistry, with high priority - at all levels, from early childhood and science lessons in schools to training at universities and advanced training for adults. Since 2005, the GDCh has been awarding the GDCh high school diploma award for the best high school graduate in chemistry at German schools. The press release 29/16 as PDF for download.

Screenshot www.chemie-studieren.de

28 Memorial plaque and festive symposium for JW Döbereiner - Hellfeld's house becomes a historic site for chemistry

28/16
July 6, 2016

He is considered the pioneer of the periodic table, discovered the catalytic effect of platinum and developed one of the first modern lighters with his platinum lighter: Johann Wolfgang Döbereiner (1780 - 1849), one of the most important German chemists in the 19th century and professor of chemistry, Pharmacy and technology at the University of Jena. In 1816 - exactly 200 years ago - he got his first own laboratory at the university and moved into the "Hellfeldsche Haus", where he researched, taught and lived with his family until his death. On this occasion, on September 7th and 8th, 2016 the Friedrich Schiller University Jena and the German Chemical Society (GDCh) are honoring the life's work and the place of activity of Johann Wolfgang Döbereiner with a symposium, a ceremony and the unveiling of the plaque ?Historic site of chemistry ?. On September 7th, the scientific Döbereiner symposium will take place: In the Döbereiner lecture hall (Am Steiger 3) four chemists will give lectures on the subject of catalysis. The ceremony will follow on September 8th in the auditorium of Jena University (Fürstengraben 1). The highlight is the unveiling of the memorial plaque at the ?Hellfeldschen Haus? (Neugasse 23) followed by a reception. The event is part of the GDCh program "Historic Sites of Chemistry", with which the GDCh has been honoring achievements of historical importance in chemistry since 1999 and recognizing places of work of important scientists as places of remembrance. Scientists and the interested public are cordially invited. Participation is free of charge. Registration is possible until August 1st. About Johann Wolfgang Döbereiner Johann Wolfgang Döbereiner was born in 1780 in Hof, Upper Franconia. In addition to his apprenticeship as a pharmacist and subsequent employment as an assistant, he attended university lectures as a guest auditor and self-taught knowledge of chemistry, botany and mineralogy. During a later activity in a dyeing and bleaching factory, Döbereiner drew attention to himself with the publications of his first practical chemical work, so that in 1810 he was appointed to an extraordinary professorship for chemistry and technology at the University of Jena. Since he had neither a school leaving certificate nor a degree or a doctorate, but the doctorate was a prerequisite, the university made him a doctorate. phil. based on his previous publications, which "already bore the unmistakable stamp of ingenuity and perfection". In 1816 the chemical institute - and with him Döbereiner and his family - moved into the Hellfeld house. Although the universities of Bonn, Dorpat, Halle, Munich and Würzburg tried to win over the scientist, he always remained loyal to Jena. During his work there he published the work "Attempt to group elementary substances according to their analogy" (1829), in which he arranged 30 of the 53 chemical elements known at the time in groups of three, the so-called "triads", based on similar properties. Döbereiner's triad rule is an important basis for the periodic table of the elements. He also excelled in investigating the catalytic effect of platinum metals and invented, among other things, one of the first modern lighters: the platinum lighter. Döbereiner died in Jena in 1849, leaving behind his wife Clara and eight children. The GDCh is issuing a brochure for the event, which presents the academic work of the honoree and the scope of his work in the current context in a generally understandable form. The brochure can be obtained from the GDCh (b.koehler@gdch.de). Further information on the Internet at www.gdch.de/historischestaetten. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. With the "Historic Sites of Chemistry" program, memories of the cultural heritage of chemistry are kept alive and chemistry and its historical roots are brought more into the public eye. An essential criterion for the selection of a historical site is that the discoveries connected with it are of great importance for people and society.

27 ORCHEM 2016 in Weimar - great days for Organic Chemistry

27/16
5th july 2016

Due to the current topics and top-class speakers, ORCHEM is one of the most attractive conferences in the field of organic chemistry for scientists from research and industry. In addition to lectures on synthesis, catalysis, methodology and reactivity, the focus this year is on awards for deserving scientists and young talents. The conference is organized by the Liebig Association for Organic Chemistry and takes place from September 5th to 7th in Weimar. The ORCHEM winners Magauer and Mancheño the Liebig Association for Organic Chemistry, a division of the German Chemical Society (GDCh), gives at the conference to 5,000 euros in prize ORCHEM Prize to two younger chemists for their new, original and pioneering scientific work , namely to Dr. Thomas Magauer, Ludwig Maximilians University Munich, and Professor Dr. Olga Garcia Mancheño, University of Regensburg. Magauer, born 1983 in Linz (Austria), worked as a postdoc at Harvard University after completing his studies and doctorate in Vienna. In 2012 he began to set up an independent working group at the University of Munich, which has been supported by the German Research Foundation since 2013. Magauer is concerned with the synthesis of complex natural substances, which could be an important source of pharmaceutical and agriculturally usable active ingredients, and is looking for new synthetic routes and methods for this purpose. Mancheño studied chemistry from 1994 to 2001 at the University of Madrid, where she completed her doctorate in 2005 after brief research stays at the Max Planck Institute for Coal Research, Mülheim / Ruhr, and at the University of Aarhus, Denmark. After a three-year postdoc stay at RWTH Aachen University, she led an independent working group at the University of Münster and completed her habilitation there. After a substitute professorship at the University of Göttingen, she has been Professor of Organic Chemistry at the University of Regensburg since 2013. With the aim of researching new materials and bioactive compounds, she develops novel and sustainable synthesis methods with the help of modern catalytic processes. Emil Fischer Medal to Dirk Trauner The GDCh awards two prizes in Weimar: The Emil Fischer Medal goes to Professor Dr. Dirk Trauner, Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich. The Gmelin-Beilstein memorial coin, also endowed with prize money of 7,500 euros, goes to Dr. Joe P. Richmond, Heidelberg. Trauner, born in 1967 in Linz (Austria), studied at the University of Vienna first Biology, Biochemistry and then subsequently moved on to study chemistry at the Free University of Berlin. He completed his doctoral thesis at the University of Frankfurt in 1997 in Vienna. After a postdoctoral stay at the Sloan-Kettering Institute for Cancer Research, New York, he was first assistant and then associate professor at the University of California, Berkeley, for ten years. In 2008 he accepted a professorship for Chemical Biology and chemical genetics at LMU Munich. Trauner is an internationally recognized expert in the field of chemical synthesis who makes significant contributions to natural product chemistry and the rapidly expanding field of chemical neurobiology. Since he is also increasingly dedicating himself to cancer research, his fundamental work in this field is also carried out by colleagues from biological and medical disciplines. Although Trauner is considered the leading chemical neurobiologist, more than 80 synthesized natural products identify him as an excellent organic chemist. Gmelin Beilstein Medal to Joe P. Richmond The Gmelin Beilstein Medal is awarded for special services to the History of Chemistry, chemical literature or chemical information. The award winner Joe P. Richmond, born in Wilmington, Delaware, in 1944, first accepted the position of technical assistant in plastics research at DuPont after studying at Brown University in Rhode Island, then went to Germany to study German at the Goethe Institute to learn, studied philosophy in Cologne and returned to the USA to study chemistry. He received his PhD from the Massachusetts Institute of Technology in 1970. He worked in teaching and research at Harvard University and at the University of California, Berkeley, until he returned to linguistic and literary studies in France, Italy and Germany. After another three years of chemical research at the Institute for Organic Chemistry at the University of Hamburg, he found his dream job as an editor for chemical science literature, first at Georg Thieme Verlag in Stuttgart, then at Springer Verlag in Heidelberg. Until now he has worked as a freelance editor at both Wiley-VCH and Thieme Verlag. He is considered a ?pacesetter? for organic-chemical specialist literature. In 1989 he founded Synlett, a leading synthetic chemistry journal. He transferred the printed Houben-Weyl to the electronic successor, which is now the largest manual on synthetic chemistry, ?Science for Synthesis?. Both publications are published by Georg Thieme Verlag. Notable Lectures The ?Synlett Best Paper Award Lecture? will be held at ORCHEM by Professor Dr. Frank Glorius, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, who takes the participants on a journey of discovery into the world of catalysis. For him, catalysis is a key technology of our time because it enables chemical conversion processes to run more selectively and efficiently, and because it also makes it easier to obtain new and initially unexpected results. How you have to proceed in order to discover new things, he will explain using examples from his working group. The "EurJoc Lecture", selected by the European Journal of Organic Chemistry, will be held by Professor Dr. Ilan Marek from the Technion-Israel Institute of Technology in Haifa. He opened up a new synthetic route in a one-pot reaction, starting from simple small organic ring systems, via selective ring opening to obtain quaternary carbon stereocenters, which are the starting points for important organic syntheses. Professor Dr. Peter Hammann, Sanofi-Aventis GmbH, Frankfurt, will give an insight into pharmaceutical research and the development history of previously discovered antibiotics (3,500 are known to be marketed) with his lecture on natural substances that could help to get the antibiotic crisis under control currently only four substance classes developed in the recent past). The evening lecture "Chemistry meets Piano: Musical Stories with a Chemical Twist" by Professor Dr. Nuno Maulide, University of Vienna. Using selected case studies, he shows that there are many points of contact between music and chemistry, which one can discover when looking at their worldwide technical terminology. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the Liebig Association for Organic Chemistry with around 1,500 members. The main concerns of the Liebig Association for Organic Chemistry are, among other things, to stimulate research directions and research projects in the field of organic chemistry, to provide information about essential activities in this field and to make important and current aspects of organic chemistry known through intensive public relations work. Further information at www.gdch.de/orchem2016

26 New statistics for chemistry courses published - number of beginners continues to rise

26/16
June 30, 2016

As in previous years, the German Chemical Society (GDCh) collected extensive statistical data on chemistry courses in 2016. The data for 2015 was queried in the courses chemistry, business chemistry, Biochemistry/ life sciences, Food Chemistry and in the chemistry courses at universities of applied sciences. The number of beginners, the number of final exams passed, as well as the respective grades and duration of study were recorded. In addition, many universities provided information on the career entry of their graduates after completing their degree or doctorate. Thereafter, the number of beginners in chemistry and Biochemistry again, while they remained at the previous year's level in Food Chemistry and universities of applied sciences. The total number of first-year students was 11,586 in the fifth year and over 10,000. If you add master?s and diploma degrees together, the number of graduates in chemistry and at universities of applied sciences has increased compared to the previous year, while Biochemistry and Food Chemistry decreased slightly. Almost all Bachelor graduates at universities went on to study for a Master?s degree. At the universities of applied sciences this proportion was 63%. Around 80% of the master?s graduates at universities started a doctorate. This value is lower than the long-term average (90%), and the next few years will show whether this phenomenon, which first appeared last year, will persist. The number of doctorates has increased again. In chemistry, the universities reported 2,685 Bachelor and 2,034 Master graduates. 309 graduates completed their studies in one of the expiring diploma courses. 1,901 people received their doctorate in chemistry in 2015, including 20% foreign chemists. The duration of the doctorate increased to around four years compared to the previous year. In Biochemistry , 947 Bachelor and 700 Master graduates were registered, as well as 43 diploma exams and 242 doctorates. At universities of applied sciences, 858 students completed their bachelor's degree and 460 their master's degree. In Food Chemistry , 274 people passed the main examination A or the diploma examination. 163 students passed the main examination part B. In addition, the universities reported 142 Bachelor and 50 Master degrees and 61 doctorates. 51% of graduates with a doctorate in chemistry are aware of the first step into professional life. After that, the job market for these young professionals was difficult, as in the previous year. This was expressed on the one hand in the increase in the number of graduates who were initially looking for a job, and also in the comparatively high proportion of those who initially only found a temporary job. According to the universities, 31% of the newly graduated chemists were hired in the chemical and pharmaceutical industry, 13% took up a position in the rest of the economy. 14% first went abroad after completing their doctorate, in most cases for a postdoc stay. 19% started in an initially temporary position in Germany (including postdocs) and three percent in a permanent position at a university or research institute. Four percent found employment in other areas of the public service. 15% were temporarily looking for a job - also due to the time of the survey. The brochure "Chemistry courses in Germany - Statistical data 2015" (56 pages, 21 graphics, 36 tables) is available as a pdf at www.gdch.de/statistik. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. Among other things, she deals with current developments at universities and on the labor market. The GDCh determines annually (reference date: December 31st) information on the number of students in the various study sections, the exams taken and the length of study. The information is provided to the GDCh by the chemistry departments of the universities. The press release 26/16 as PDF for download.

Abbildung 1: Studienanfänger/innen im Diplom- und Bachelor-Studiengang Chemie
Abbildung 2: Verbleib der im Jahr 2015 promovierten Chemiker/innen (Studiengang Chemie)

25 Industry 4.0 - The role of chemistry at the conference of the Association for Chemistry and Economics

25/16
June 14, 2016

"Industry 4.0" is currently a central topic in the German economy. More and more companies from a wide variety of industries have already recognized the potential of the first approaches and solutions - including the chemical industry. The Association for Chemistry and Economics (VCW), a section of the German Chemical Society (GDCh), deals with the topic and invites you to the conference "Internet of things: Industry 4.0 - Role of the chemical industry" on September 1, 2016 to Merck in Darmstadt. "Industry 4.0" is seen as a key factor for the sustainable development of German industry - and thus also for the chemical and pharmaceutical industries. After first the steam engine, then the assembly line and finally electronics revolutionized industry, we are now on the threshold of "Industry 4.0", the so-called "Internet of Things", the fourth industrial revolution. In order to benefit from this, it is important for companies to establish new technology standards in good time in order to optimally network products, machines, systems and instruments. The conference will therefore discuss how companies can implement Industry 4.0 approaches and solutions: How can your own company be prepared for the upcoming requirements and how can radically new business models be developed against this background? Answers to this promise are promised by a series of lectures by recognized experts from the industry. Chemical companies are usually process-oriented and are excellent at solving complex problems. In contrast, they are usually not well prepared for the requirements of Industry 4.0 for dynamically changing business models. Therefore, another fundamental question of the conference will address the importance of Industry 4.0 for the chemical industry. The focus will be on what can be learned from companies that have already taken this step and what perspectives arise against this background. The VCW Prize, worth 1,000 euros, for excellent academic achievements in business chemistry will also be presented at the conference. The aim of the award is to make the subject of business chemistry and the award-winning graduates better known in the industrial environment in order to highlight the attractiveness of the course for students. Proposals for candidates can be submitted in the GDCh headquarters until July 22. Further information at www.gdch.de/vcw2016. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the Association for Chemistry and Economics with around 550 members, which emerged in 2002 from the Working Group for Chemistry and Business, which was founded in 1999. The VCW has set itself the goal of combining natural sciences, especially chemistry, and economics and building an international "chemical industry" network. The press release 25/16 as PDF for download.

24 biochemists meet in Frankfurt in July - focus on Chemical Biology

24/16
May 24, 2016

Chemical Biology uses and develops chemical tools and methods to specifically influence biological systems. Targeted changes made to biopolymers such as nucleic acids and proteins will be the focus from July 6th to 8th, 2016 in Frankfurt. As part of the conference "Shaping the Molecules of Life: Chemical Biology of Nucleic Acid and Protein Modifications" of the Biochemistry division of the German Chemical Society (GDCh), 26 lectures and numerous poster presentations will illuminate the topic from all sides. A special highlight is the awarding of the Albrecht Kossel Prize to Professor Dr. Johannes Buchner, Technical University of Munich, who will be honored on July 7th for his fundamental research into protein folding in living cells. In his lecture ?Molecular Chaperones - Cellular Machines for Protein Folding?, the award winner will present his work. Proteins require a defined three-dimensional structure in order to be able to perform their functions - from enzymatic catalysis to immune defense. The formation of the structure, the protein folding, is a complicated process that is supported in the cell by specific folding helper proteins, the molecular chaperones. An example of a chaperone is the alpha crystalline in the lens of the eye, which protects the proteins in the lens from aggregation (cataract) for decades. The elucidation of the structure and the activation mechanism of this protective protein also makes it possible to search for possibilities of therapeutic intervention. In general, Buchner's work, in addition to basic research, is of great importance for the biotechnological protein production in cell factories and for the treatment of protein folding diseases such as Alzheimer's and Parkinson's. Buchner (56) completed his studies in Biology at the University of Regensburg, where he also received his doctorate and qualified as a professor after a postdoctoral stay in the USA. Since 1998 he has held the chair for Biotechnology at the Chemistry Department of the Technical University of Munich in Garching. The winner of several awards is currently President of the Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology. The aim of chemical Biology is to study biological systems with the help of chemical synthesis and analysis. In addition to pure basic research, it is also about creating new functions that can also be of interest as active ingredients for pharmaceuticals. A number of lectures at the Frankfurt conference deal with the chemical Biology of DNA and RNA modifications, in particular in order to better understand the mechanisms of damage to genetic material and the conversion of genetic information into proteins. It is not about changing the DNA or RNA sequences, but about epigenetic and post-transcriptional mechanisms, i.e. subsequent modifications of DNA or RNA. This enables new approaches to understanding the genetic regulation of developmental and disease processes. DNA / RNA epigenetics has experienced an almost explosive increase in knowledge in recent years, which is mainly due to the discovery of modified nucleotides, for example methylated cytosines. In order to enable the identification of such nucleotide modifications in the entire genome or transcriptome, high-throughput sequencing techniques have been developed. Professor Dr. Chengqi Yi from Peking University. His chemically supported sequencing technology will enable functional investigations on these DNA / RNA modifications in the future and clarify the question of how and why these take place. Professor Dr. Thomas Carell from the Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich deals with the epigenetic information that is stored in the genome in the form of modified bases. The location and type of modification also determine the identity of the cell, which develops from omnipotent stem cells into a specialized adult cell. In his lecture he shows chemical synthesis routes to such modified bases. With the help of mainly mass spectrometric analysis techniques, he wants to decipher the biological functions of the modified epigenetic bases and thus the chemistry of the stem cells. Overall, the lecture program is very diverse. A number of lectures also deal with the expansion of the functional repertoire of proteins and nucleic acids. Here, too, the aim is to better understand their functions with the help of synthetic-chemical changes to biomolecules. The lectures on chemo-selective protein synthesis will also discuss the potential biomedical benefits. Further information on the conference can be found at www.gdch.de/biochemistry2016. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the division Biochemistry with 740 members. The GDCh awards numerous prizes for excellent performance in the various sub-disciplines of chemistry. The Albrecht Kossel Prize, endowed with 7,500 euros, was set up in 2012 and was first awarded in 2014. The award's namesake, Ludwig Karl Martin Leonhard Albrecht Kossel (1853 - 1927), was a German biochemist, physician and physiologist. In 1910 he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for his research on the cell nucleus and the isolation of nucleic acids and determination of their constitutions.

23 Photosynthesis, photocatalysis, photovoltaics
Chemistry and light - the latest brochure for bright minds

23/16
May 11, 2016

?The sun is the central source of energy for life on earth. The conversion of solar energy into chemical energy through photosynthesis in plants exceeds the current global energy needs of humans by almost ten times, ?says Professor Dr. Wolfgang Lubitz, Mülheim / Ruhr, one of around 50 renowned authors in the recently published brochure ?HighChem up close - the latest on chemistry and light?. The overview published by the German Chemical Society (GDCh) deals with numerous other light-induced processes such as photography, laser printing, photocatalysis and photovoltaics. And even when light is used in the service of Medicine , biochemical processes play a role. Light also provides important information for chemistry - keyword Spectroscopy. Spectroscopic methods are also the focus of analytica, the world's most important laboratory trade fair in Munich. You and the accompanying analytica conference were selected this year to present the new HighChem brochure to the public - on May 10th at the GDCh booth. The actual current occasion for this brochure goes back to last year, the ?International Year of Light and Light-Based Technologies?, for which the year 2015 was proclaimed by the UN General Assembly. The GDCh published an up-to-date article on ?Chemistry and Light? every week on its Internet platform ?Aktuelle Wochenschau? (www.aktuelle-wochenschau.de). In the brochure, these articles, edited journalistically and didactically, are now available in an appealing and easily legible form. The brochure on chemistry and light is the 11th volume in the GDCh's HighChem series (www.gdch.de/publikationen/highchem). This series is very popular with teachers, who are happy to take up topics for their upper school classes and request class sets. It helps prospective and young students to orient themselves with regard to special interests and possible fields of study, stimulates science journalists on new topics and helps with research - in short: It is an asset for everyone who is interested in the natural sciences and has a good educational background. The new HighChem up-close brochure ?The latest on chemistry and light? has a length of 108 pages with appealing and informative illustrations and can be requested from pr@gdch.de. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. One of her concerns is to make modern chemistry understandable to laypeople and thus to open up connections in natural sciences and technology. She wants to achieve this goal with the current newsreel and the HighChem brochures. The GDCh is divided into 28 specialist groups and sections, including the Photochemistry division , which played a key role in shaping the content of this brochure. Other GDCh specialist groups were involved in the design of the content, including above all the specialist groups in Chemical Education, Analytical Chemistry, Coating Chemistry and Macromolecular Chemistry. The press release 23/16 as PDF for download.

22 church towers and lighthouses of science - Senior Expert Chemists meet in Münster

22/16
4th May 2016

The sixth annual meeting of Senior Expert Chemists from the German Chemical Society (GDCh) will take place from May 18 to 20, 2016 at the Westphalian Wilhelms University of Münster. In addition to generally understandable lectures on top topics such as energy, lighting, gas storage and catalysis, the conference under the motto "Münster between church towers and lighthouses of science" also offers an insight into research in Münster, a poster exhibition, excursions and time to network. On Monday evening, ?Vivaldi goes chemistry? is an extraordinary experimental lecture on the program. The lecture by the Deputy President of the GDCh, Professor Dr. Herwig A. Buchholz, Merck KGaA, Darmstadt. Since the first multilayer OLED component was manufactured in 1987, organic light-emitting diodes have conquered many applications in the display and lighting sector. Today they are used, for example, in smartphones and television sets as well as in the ?wearable? area of smartwatches and multifunctional wristbands. Buchholz presents the underlying types of OLED materials, explains processing methods and shows the current status of developments. In nature there are often materials that far exceed the possible uses of artificially manufactured products. Spider silks are an example of this: their silk fibers are unique in terms of their stability and elasticity and are three to five times tougher than aramid fibers (trade names Kevlar, Twaron), which are among the most stable synthetic fibers. In addition, spider silks are biocompatible, they do not trigger allergies, they have an anti-inflammatory effect and promote wound healing. Professor Dr. Thomas Scheibel from the University of Bayreuth shows in his lecture how the combination of natural science and engineering makes it possible to biotechnologically produce and process spider silk proteins for product-specific applications and thus create a new generation of materials. The chemistry teachers Dr. Roland Full and Dr. Werner Ruf at the experimental lecture "Vivaldi goes Chemistry". By adding substances with pinpoint accuracy, they start physical and chemical processes and thus develop pictures that ?paint themselves?. In their experiments, they describe the seasons from a completely new perspective. The dynamic projections are underlaid with both classical and contemporary music. Full and Ruf show chemistry from its most beautiful side, which is also accessible to non-chemists. Further information on the conference can be found at www.gdch.de/sec2016. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It maintains 28 specialist groups and sections, including the Senior Expert Chemists Section (SEC) with around 300 members. The SEC was founded as a working group in October 2006 and offers all chemists who are no longer working the opportunity to exchange ideas. The members of the section contribute their experience to various projects, such as international exchange, school sponsorships to strengthen science lessons or public relations work to improve awareness of chemistry.

21 analytica conference 2016 in Munich - Foodomics, more than just a fashion term?

21/16
May 3, 2016

Analytical Chemistry provides Food Chemistry with ever better instruments and methods for checking the ingredients and quality of food. The current food analysis instruments are summarized under the term "Foodomics". It offers scientists new ways of tackling increasing challenges in the food and nutrition sciences. This includes, for example, the detection of food ingredients with anti-carcinogenic properties - a topic of the session ?Foodomics - Tools for Comprehensive Food Analysis? at the analytica conference 2016 from May 10th to 12th in Munich. No less a person than Professor Dr. Alejandro Cifuentes from the Spanish Consejo Superior de Investigaciones Científicas (CSIC) in Madrid, who in 2009 was the first to define foodomics in a specialist journal, presents his research on anti-carcinogenic substances in food using "omics" techniques. In the past year this work was mainly done in the Foodomics Laboratory of the CSIC, in which the quality and bioactivity of food and food ingredients are examined in general with the help of transcriptomics, proteomics and metabolomics. Transcriptomics is the biochemical investigation of the transcriptome, i.e. the genes actually transcribed from DNA to RNA. Correspondingly, one examines the proteome, i.e. the totality of proteins (e.g. in a cell), with methods of proteomics and metabolites, i.e. conversion products, for example of a pesticide in the environment or in the body, with metabolomics. ?Omics? techniques, applied to food, form the foodomics, in which the latest and currently best methods for the examination of food are used in the service of health and optimal nutrition. The work of Cifuentes included the development of innovative extraction processes in order to obtain bioactive substances from different natural sources, such as plants, including algae, microalgae as well as waste and by-products of food production. These extracts were tested for their inhibitory effects on colon cancer growth. The chemical characterization was carried out with two-dimensional chromatographic-mass spectrometric separation techniques, and the "omics" techniques were used in the identification of genes, proteins and metabolites. The analysis of genetic sequences is the latest state of the art in order to identify the plant and animal components of food. Because the DNA provides high-resolution molecular fingerprints of every organism. Even the smallest differences in the genome can be detected, so that not only the species itself, but also, for example, different varieties or regions of origin can be determined. "The capabilities of genomics to authenticate food" is what Professor Dr. Markus Fischer from the Hamburg School of Food Science, the science center for food at the University of Hamburg, presented ongoing research projects. In view of the abundance of substances in plants or foodstuffs that are yet to be discovered or that are not adequately understood in terms of their effective potential, ?omics? techniques give hope for further exciting findings that are beneficial to the health and well-being of each individual. This is illustrated by further examples at the analytica conference: Proteomics techniques are used to detect and characterize allergens in food, in the trace range in which previous methods failed. Fragments of allergens that resist digestion and trigger allergic reactions can also be identified in this way. For all wine lovers, the ?omics? techniques have so far opened ?dark? chapters in wine maturation: Metabolomics in particular make it increasingly possible to track the chemical processes that take place during the storage and aging of wine. It is slowly becoming clear how the ingredients of the wine, depending on the grape variety and soil, react to the processing in the winery and the storage conditions. In this way, the various nuances in taste of the wine can also be understood from the point of view of their chemistry, and some undesirable developments in aging could perhaps be avoided. A final example from the foodomics session of the analytica conference are Pesticides, i.e. herbicides, insecticides and fungicides. As far as its metabolism is concerned, routine analysis reaches its limits here; because it only looks for known or suspected metabolites of the pesticides. "UPLC-HR-QToF-MS" is the name of the technology used - ultimately a sophisticated method of chromatographic-mass spectrometric coupling - with which it is possible to find unknown metabolites and more: It can also reveal the use of prohibited Pesticides or fraud in the application . The analytica conference takes place in the ICM - International Congress Center Munich. Admission is free for visitors to analytica, the leading international trade fair for laboratory technology, analysis and Biotechnology. Analytica will take place from May 10th to 13th on the grounds of Messe München. For the program of the analytica conference, which lasts from May 10th to May 12th, the three scientific societies united in Forum Analytics, the German Chemical Society (GDCh), Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (GBM) and the German Association for Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (DGKL), responsible. Current program for the analytica conference at www.gdch.de/analyticaconf2016 or in the dates database at www.analytica.de/conference. Contact for the press: analytica conference Dr. Renate Hoer
German Chemical Society
public relation
Tel .: +49 69 7917-493
Email: r.hoer@gdch.de analytica Kathrin Hagel
Press officer analytica
Tel: +49 89 949-21474
E-Mail: kathrin.hagel@messe-muenchen.de The press release 21/16 as PDF for download.

20 Agriculture and Food - Analytical Chemists: Guardians of the Environment and Health

20/16
April 28, 2016

Glyphosate is not an isolated case. Many substances that we ingest daily with our food are under discussion because of their health effects. And there are more and more. Because analytical chemists are constantly discovering new substances in the mostly highly complex foods that are then directly biologically effective or react and change in the human body during and after the ingestion of food. Some examples and the current research on them will be presented at the analytica conference from May 10th to 12th in Munich. This conference runs parallel to analytica, the leading trade fair for laboratory technology, analytics and biotechnology on the grounds of Messe München. It was not until the 1960s that they slowly caught the attention of scientists: the toxins that are produced by mold, the mycotoxins. A large number of such substances have so far been discovered and their toxic effects investigated. The spectrum ranges from hepatotoxic and carcinogenic to mutagenic, cytotoxic and neurotoxic to antibiotic effects. But these substances also undergo chemical changes, triggered by living organisms, i.e. plants and animals, or by food processing, be it in the kitchen or in industry. We currently know about the formation mechanisms and the toxic relevance of such modified mycotoxins. only a little. However, reliable data from analytical examinations of food samples prove their existence. At the analytica conference, significant advances in unraveling the complex interactions between the original mycotoxin and a plant, animal or human "host organism" will be presented, which should help to trace the metabolic pathways on which the modified mycotoxins are formed. Unexpected results are brought to light: Plants, for example, are able to form special metabolites, which are known as ?masked mycotoxins?, but lose their ?masking? in the gastrointestinal tract and the starting material is excreted in this way. The mold Fusarium avenaceum attacks grain and is widespread throughout Europe, but especially in Scandinavia. At the analytica conference, a working group from Oslo is presenting its ongoing research work on the mode of action of the poison produced by this fungus, the polyketide AOD. It has a cytotoxic effect, i.e. it attacks the tissue cells. There is every indication that the cell membrane is the target of this toxin, which in its chemical structure is similar to that of the fumonisins produced by other Fusarium species. Therefore these studies, in which scientists from Denmark and the USA are also involved and in which interactions with enzymes are observed, are of general importance for research on mycotoxins, in particular on fumonisins and aflatoxins. Aflatoxins and fumonisins are the focus of scientific research, but increasingly also phomopsins, especially phomopsin A. It is produced by Diaporthe toxica, a mold that attacks lupine seeds and plants, which are becoming increasingly interesting as high-quality protein suppliers. Serious poisoning has so far occurred in sheep in Australia and New Zealand. Phomopsins act as liver toxins. The research is still at the very beginning, but is also considered extremely important because phomopsins also affect other legumes, such as peas and beans. Research continues to focus on toxic, nitrogenous plant compounds. A group of more than 500 compounds are the pyrrolizidine alkaloids and their nitrogen oxides (PA / PANO), which are probably produced by more than 6,000 plant species, among them mainly sunflower, borage family and legumes. Liver-toxic and carcinogenic properties are attributed to the PA / PANO. These compounds are proven in honey and various types of tea, among other things. In Munich, the latest analytical results will be presented and possible effects on human and animal health discussed. When it comes to anthropogenic, i.e. man-made pollutants, perfluorinated and polyfluorinated alkane compounds (PAFS) and metabolic products of pesticides are the focus in Munich. Perfluorinated and polyfluorinated compounds are required, for example, for water-repellent, breathable clothing, for dirt-, oil- and water-repellent papers, for packaging materials in the food sector, for the impregnation of furniture, carpets and shoes, as well as for coating pots and pans and for fire-fighting foams. It is therefore not surprising that PAFS can be detected everywhere in nature: in water, in Soil, in food, in animals and in humans, here in the blood as well as in breast milk. PAFS are not biodegradable, and harmful effects have been found in animal experiments at high doses. PAFS enter the human body through food, including tap water and mineral water. But how high can the PAFS concentration in the body be, how much PAFS can a person consume every day? These questions have not yet been clarified. The analytical chemists provide the basic data for this, i.e. for toxicological assessments. The situation is even more tricky with the analytical inventory of the metabolic products (metabolites) of pesticides, i.e. fungicides, insecticides and pesticides. After all, it is possible that some metabolites could have an even more toxic effect than the pesticide applied to crops. A number of metabolites have been found in the past, but the search of analytical chemists continues to protect humans and the environment. The analytica conference takes place in the ICM - International Congress Center Munich. Admission is free for visitors to analytica, the leading international trade fair for laboratory technology, analysis and Biotechnology. Analytica will take place from May 10th to 13th on the grounds of Messe München. For the program of the analytica conference, which lasts from May 10th to May 12th, the three scientific societies united in Forum Analytics, the German Chemical Society (GDCh), Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (GBM) and the German Association for Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (DGKL), responsible. Current program for the analytica conference at www.gdch.de/analyticaconf2016 or in the dates database at www.analytica.de/conference. Contact for the press: analytica conference
Dr. Renate Hoer
German Chemical Society
public relation
Tel .: +49 69 7917-493
Email: r.hoer@gdch.de analytica
Kathrin Hagel
Press officer analytica
Tel .: +49 89 949-21474
E-Mail: kathrin.hagel@messe-muenchen.de Press release 20/16 as PDF for download.

19 More important than ever - analytica conference 2016 in Munich

19/16
April 19, 2016

Does our more knowledge unsettle us more and more? The best example is food. Health-conscious citizens are just as interested in the natural substances it contains as are the substances brought in through human activities - just take glyphosate. But where does the knowledge come from, what is contained in food and in what quantities? The answers are provided by Analytical Chemistry, which will be the focus of analytica from May 10th to 13th at the Munich exhibition center. The analytica conference runs parallel to the world's largest trade fair for the laboratory industry until May 12th. The analytica conference focuses on analytical separation techniques, and that is no wonder. Before you can precisely determine which substances are present in a complex mixture of substances - for example, the aromatic substance analysis to track down the character of a wine - the substances must be separated from one another, which are often only contained in very small quantities. And that applies to plant extracts as well as to coal tar. These separation techniques, whether chromatographic or electrophoretic, have been refined more and more in the last few decades, and they have also become more and more sensitive, more precise, more reliable and faster. Exactly these attributes have to be fulfilled for example in doping controls. In 24 to 48 hours, however, the substances not only have to be separated from one another, they also have to be unequivocally identified. And that is done, directly linked to the chromatography, mostly by mass spectrometry. However, an expert, the analytical chemist, is always required to carry out and evaluate the experiment correctly. The analytica conference shows the latest trends for him and everyone working in analytical laboratories. And this year this includes multidimensional techniques in gas and liquid chromatography. Because in order to obtain meaningful analysis results with complicated samples, it is not enough to separate and analyze once in one process step; this has to be done several times, ?multidimensionally?. Thus the conference session ?Separation techniques: How many dimensions are enough?? Is very topical. It shows intelligent ways of the multi-dimensional separation and analysis of complex substance mixtures. By exchanging experiences among colleagues, scientists are better able to solve their own problems in order to then be able to tell consumers, for example, what they are eating or which substances they are surrounded by. The Eberhard Gerstel Prize and the Rudolf Bock Memorial Lecture are embedded in the session. The Eberhard Gerstel Prize is awarded to young scientists for an outstanding publication in the field of analytical separation techniques. The prize of 2000 euros, which is awarded every two years, is donated by GERSTEL GmbH & Co. KG Mülheim an der Ruhr. The winner this year is the 27-year-old doctoral student Andrea Beutner from the University of Regensburg. In spring 2015 she published an article in the American Chemical Society's Analytical Chemistry journal on the two-dimensional separation of ionic species by coupling capillary ion chromatography and capillary electrophoresis with mass spectrometry. This two-dimensional separation system is an instrumental innovation. The significance of the work in terms of equipment technology is documented by the international patent application that has now been published. The Rudolf Bock Memorial Lecture is given to private lecturer Dr. Wolfgang Dünges, Mainz, hold, one of the companions of Rudolf Bock with great success in the field of micro-methods for the enrichment and separation of substances. He will also report on these methods in his celebratory lecture. Professor Dr. In the 1970s, Rudolf Bock wrote numerous standard works that presented Analytical Chemistry in a systematic way and are still used today. In addition, he was considered an excellent university professor with numerous successful research papers on separation techniques. The analytica conference takes place in the ICM - International Congress Center Munich. Admission is free for visitors to analytica, the leading international trade fair for laboratory technology, analysis and Biotechnology. Analytica will take place from May 10th to 13th on the grounds of Messe München. For the program of the analytica conference, which lasts from May 10th to May 12th, the three scientific societies united in Forum Analytics, the German Chemical Society (GDCh), Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (GBM) and the German Association for Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (DGKL), responsible. Current program for the analytica conference at www.gdch.de/analyticaconf2016 or in the dates database at www.analytica.de/conference. Contact for the press: analytica conference Dr. Renate Hoer
German Chemical Society
public relation
Tel .: +49 69 7917-493
Email: r.hoer@gdch.de analytica Kathrin Hagel
Press officer analytica
Tel: +49 89 949-21474
Email: kathrin.hagel@messe-muenchen.de

The press release 19/16 as PDF for download.

18 Paul Bunge Prize goes to Robert Anderson - more than 43 years of commitment to the history of instruments

18/16
April 12, 2016

Dr. Robert. GW Anderson, Clare Hall, University of Cambridge, GB, receives the Paul Bunge Prize this year. The award ceremony will take place on May 5th during the 115th Annual General Meeting of the German Bunsen Society for Physical Chemistry - the Bunsen Conference 2016 - in Rostock. The prize of the Hans-R.-Jenemann-Stiftung is endowed with 7,500 euros and is awarded jointly by the German Chemical Society (GDCh) and the German Bunsen Society (DBG). It honors studies on the history of scientific instruments. Anderson received the award in recognition of his numerous substantial publications on the history of instruments and chemistry. For more than four decades, Anderson has made a significant contribution to ensuring that the modern, context-related and research-oriented history of instruments is anchored in the range of topics of leading museums around the world. Through his commitment, the chemical historian makes a significant contribution to preserving the representational legacy of modern science, to develop it historically and to present it in a contemporary way. Anderson, born in London in 1944, completed his chemistry studies at St. John's College, Oxford University, UK, in 1972 with a doctorate. After holding positions as curator of the chemical and physical collection at the Royal Scottish Museum in Edinburgh and as curator and later also as Head of the chemistry department at the Science Museum London, he was appointed director of the Royal Scottish Museum. From 1985 he was director at the National Museums of Scotland, which had arisen from the merger of the Royal Scottish Museum with the National Museum of Antiquities. From 1992 to 2002 he was director of the oldest national museum, the British Museum in London. Anderson is a Fellow at the Institute for Advanced Study at Princeton University, New Jersey, and a Clare Hall Fellow at the University of Cambridge. He was President of the British Society for the History of Science, has been President of the Society for the History of Alchemy and Chemistry since 2007, and Chairman of the Collection Committee of the Chemical Heritage Foundation since 2012. In addition to other academic awards, he holds honorary doctorates from the University of Durham and the University of Edinburgh. In the lecture ?Where has all the chemistry gone? on May 6th, Anderson explains how important historical exhibits are for understanding history. He reports on the importance of historical collections for research and public education. However, while exhibitions in museums in other disciplines such as archeology or natural history have long been established, the history of chemistry is clearly underrepresented. Anderson will take a differentiated look at why only a few exhibitions contain instruments and apparatus and how a successful implementation can look. The Paul Bunge Prize is considered the most important honor in the field of the history of scientific instruments worldwide and is advertised publicly and internationally. In addition to German scholars, it has also gone to British, Italian, US, Australian and Canadian scientists. The Foundation's Advisory Board, supported by the GDCh and the DBG, decides on the award. Hans R. Jenemann (1920 - 1996), chemist at Schott Glaswerke in Mainz, became known for his contributions to the history of scientific devices, especially historical scales. He himself set up the foundation in 1992. The award is named after the Hamburg precision mechanic Paul Bunge (1839?1888), one of the leading designers of laboratory balances for chemical analysis. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It maintains numerous foundations, such as the Hans R. Jenemann Foundation. The Paul-Bunge-Preis of the Hans-R.-Jenemann-Stiftung is awarded annually, alternately at DBG general meetings and lecture conferences of the GDCh division on the History of Chemistry. The press release 18/16 as PDF for download.

17 Joint commitment to excellent University teaching - Ars legendi faculty award for chemistry goes to Giessen

17/16
5th April 2016

On April 5th, the Ars legendi faculty prize in mathematics and the natural sciences was awarded for the third time in Frankfurt am Main. In the chemistry category, a team from the Justus Liebig University in Giessen, consisting of Professor Dr. Richard Göttlich, Professor Dr. Siegfried Schindler and Junior Professor Dr. Nicole Graulich, the award for excellent University teaching. The winners succeeded in combining subject and subject didactics in a unique way and convinced the jury with their interdisciplinary approach. Further Ars legendi faculty awards went to Dr. Dorothea Kaufmann from the Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg (Biosciences), to Professor Dr. Ilka Agricola from the Philipps University of Marburg (mathematics) and to Dr. Frederic Schuller from the Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg (Physics). Richard Göttlich, Siegfried Schindler and Nicole Graulich are recognized not only for their excellent teaching but also for their commitment to the general design of the course. They developed new types of modules that give students the freedom to work and study independently. For example, students in the ?Chemistry in Cyberspace? module develop their own topic with the help of new media. The module is concluded with an examination that is suitable for the topic, such as a video, an interview, a poster or even a comic. The newly created modules encourage creativity and make use of the connection to later everyday work - be it for future chemistry teachers or researchers. In addition, teaching at Göttlich, Schindler and Graulich also uses e-learning methods and online surveys via smartphones. The winners show impressively how subject and subject didactics can be innovatively combined. Richard Göttlich, who was born in Frankfurt am Main in 1969, completed his chemistry studies at the Philipps University of Marburg with a doctorate in 1996. In 2003 he obtained the Venia Legendi in organic chemistry at the University of Münster. Since 2005 he has held the professorship for organic chemistry in Giessen. Together with Schindler, he achieved 2nd place in the Hessian University Prize "Excellence in Teaching" in 2008. Siegfried Schindler, born in 1959 in Toledo, Ohio, USA, received his doctorate in chemistry in 1989 at the Technical University (today Technical University) Darmstadt. He began his habilitation at the private university Witten-Herdecke and finished it after the relocation of his work group in 1997 at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg. Since 2002 he has been Professor of Inorganic Chemistry in Giessen. Nicole Graulich, who was born in Lauterbach, Hesse, in 1982, studied chemistry and French as a grammar school teacher at the Justus Liebig University in Giessen before completing her doctorate in chemistry there in 2011. She received awards for both her thesis and her dissertation and has been a junior professor for chemistry education in Giessen since 2014. The Ars legendi Prize was awarded in the four categories of life sciences, chemistry, mathematics and Physics and is endowed with ? 5,000 each. The prize was awarded by the Stifterverband für die Deutsche Wissenschaft, the German Chemical Society, the German Mathematicians Association, the German Physical Society and the Association of Biology, Biosciences and Biomedicine in Germany. The prize is intended to make the importance of University teaching teaching for the education of the next generation in mathematics and the natural sciences visible and to create a career-effective incentive to get involved in University teaching teaching and to promote it beyond one's own sphere of activity. Additional information on this year's Ars legendi faculty award and the other award winners can be found in press release 11/16 of March 3, 2016: www.gdch.de/service-information/oeffentlichkeitsarbeit/pressenotizen.html Stifterverband press contact: Peggy Groß
Tel .: (030) 32 29 82 - 530
E-Mail: peggy.gross@stifterverband.de The press release 17/16 as PDF for download.

16 It's bubbling again in the witch's kitchens - a conference of material scientists in the Harz Mountains

16/16
March 31, 2016

On April 29th and 30th, excellent female scientists will give an insight into their often little-known subject at the eighth conference ?From the witch's kitchens of materials science?. The event is organized by the University of Oldenburg in the washhouse of the Rammelsberg World Heritage Site near Goslar. The conference by the Equal Opportunities in Chemistry Working Group of the German Chemical Society (GDCh), the German Bunsen Society for Physical Chemistry (DBG) and the Collaborative Research Center 1083 ?Structure and Dynamics of Internal Interfaces? at the University of Marburg. The patronage is the Lower Saxony Minister for Science and Culture, Dr. Gabriele Heinen-Klaji?. After the first day of the conference is used for travel, mutual exchange and networking, the scientific conference program begins on April 30th. After the welcome by the organizer of the conference, the Deputy GDCh President Professor Dr. Katharina Al-Shamery from the University of Oldenburg, it goes professionally in breadth and depth. The speakers will be the Physics professors Ursula Keller (ETH Zurich, Switzerland), Christina Silberhorn (University of Paderborn), Martina Hentschel (Technical University of Ilmenau) and Dagmar Gerthsen (KIT - Karlsruhe Institute of Technology). Chemistry is represented by Professor Dr. Maya Kiskinova (Elettra - Sincrotrone Trieste, Italy) and Dr. Maraike Ahlf (BASF Ludwigshafen). The materials scientist Professor Dr. Pooi See Lee (NTU - Nanyang Technological University, Singapore) is one of the speakers. For example, they talk about integrated quantum optics and what microspectroscopy reveals about the properties of morphologically complex functional substances. They also report on the contribution electron microscopy can make to solving material science problems in solid oxide fuel cells and what happens when quantum chaos meets application-related challenges. The conference "From the witch's kitchens of materials science" differs in one essential point from most other scientific conferences: Only researchers present - scientists are of course welcome as guests. The compatibility of family and research has also been considered: on April 30, the museum mine opens its doors to young researchers, who are competently looked after there. Registration and further information about the conference at: www.cis.uni-oldenburg.de/51386.html. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the Working Group on Equal Opportunities in Chemistry (AKCC) with around 240 members. The goals of the AKCC include the compatibility of work and family, the breaking of conventional role models and evaluations as well as the advancement of girls. The press release 16/16 as PDF for download.

15 What actually is food fraud? - Food chemists discuss new challenges

15/16
March 22, 2016

With the public evening lecture "Under constant control ... How thoroughly is our food checked?", The 2016 working conference of the North Regional Association of the Food Chemical Society begins on April 4th at the TU Braunschweig. The motto of the conference, which will be continued on April 5th with eleven scientific lectures, a keynote speech and a panel discussion on food fraud, is under the motto ?Requirements for modern Food Chemistry in the age of global goods flows and the need for constant product innovations?. ?Food fraud? means food fraud, and although this is as old as humanity, it has been the focus of official surveillance since the horse meat case in 2013, in which beef was blended with small amounts of edible horse meat. This aims to prevent future cases of fraud with a cascade of reporting, information and evaluation systems, to detect them at an early stage and to communicate them across the EU. There is still no official definition of food fraud; Experts from the EU Commission define the term ?food fraud? as an intentional violation of food law regulations in order to achieve a financial or economic advantage. The food chemist Dr. Ulrich Nöhle, who, as an honorary professor at the TU Braunschweig, reads the subject ?Quality Management in Industrial Food Production?, will in his keynote address in particular on cases of fraud made possible by the globalization of the flow of goods, and will report on the first EU measures. After that, a legislative tendency seems to be emerging that, in addition to food safety, increasingly questions food fraud. As a result, the Commission is promoting the development of analytical methods that can help identify food adulterations more quickly and easily. Of the eleven lectures, eight deal with different analytical issues in Food Chemistry. In the lecture by Dr. Axel Preuss, Food and Veterinary Institute Oldenburg, but also reports on the future of the German food book, which is currently being reformed. In the discussion about the goals of the reform, considerations arise again and again as to whether the guiding principles of the food book will not lose significantly in importance with the entry into force of the food information regulation at the end of 2014. Preuss is a member of the German Food Book Commission. The 14 poster presentations are also predominantly analytical. The best poster will be awarded the Food & Health Innovation Award, an initiative of the Hamburg School of Food Science. In no other country in Europe are so many experts concerned with the control of the safety and quality of food as in Germany. The regular evaluations of the results of the official Food monitoring show that only comparatively few foods on our market do not meet the requirements. Most of the deviations are found in the labeling of food. Nevertheless, the tight network of food controls has loopholes that need to be closed in order to protect consumers effectively. The public lecture "Under constant control ... How thoroughly is our food checked?" With Dr. Ulrich Nehring will take place on Monday, April 4, 2016 at 6.30 p.m. in the auditorium in the Haus der Wissenschaften, Pockelsstraße 3, in Braunschweig. Entry is free. More information at www.gdch.de/netzwerk-struktur/fachstruktur/lebensmittelchemische-gesellschaft/regionalverbaende. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the Food Chemistry Society, whose task it is to promote the exchange of ideas in the field of Food Chemistry and its related disciplines and to provide technical suggestions. For this purpose, among other things, conferences of the six regional associations are held. With almost 2,900 members, the Food Chemistry Society is the largest division in the GDCh. It organizes the German Food Chemists' Day every year - this year from September 12th to 14th in Freising-Weihenstephan. The press release 15/16 as PDF for download.

14 groundwater, drinking water, wastewater and more - water chemists meet at the Regnitz in Bamberg

14/16
March 21, 2016

In the 90th year of its existence, the Water Chemistry Society, a division in the German Chemical Society (GDCh), invites you to its annual meeting in Bamberg for the second time since 1966. Around 250 participants are expected at ?Wasser 2016?, which will take place from May 2nd to 4th - of course, water chemists, but also many other water experts from Germany, Austria and Switzerland. In addition to the thematic blocks characteristic of the annual conference, which include trace substances and wastewater, bodies of water and groundwater or drinking water and hygiene, this year's special topic deals with the regional aspect of the use of water resources in southern Germany. In Bamberg, also known as the capital of beer, the conference participants can expect, among other things, the lecture ?The Myth of Brewing Water?. Dr.-Ing. Karl Glas, Head of the water technology department at the Technical University of Munich in Weihenstephan, will explain the special requirements for water for the beer brewing process. Dr. Michael Altmayer from the Bavarian State Ministry for the Environment and Consumer Protection in his lecture "Drought 2015 - that comes more often now, what can we do?" "clarify why the water management balance between the Danube and Main areas is necessary in order to reduce water-related barriers in Franconia. Another Bavaria-related lecture can be found in the topic block" Waters and groundwater ":" Water management effects of increasing maize cultivation in Bavaria ". This is about Increased concentrations of pesticides and nitrates, especially in small rivers and in the groundwater in areas with intensive maize cultivation. The Helmholtz Center for Environmental Research in Leipzig is working on a similar topic and in Bamberg examines the ?Influence of hydrology and land use on molecular composition of dissolved organic carbon ?, which has to be removed by flocculation in water treatment. Other current topics are, to single out a few examples, the transformation pathways of diclofenac in biological wastewater treatment, the investigation of hospital wastewater for estrogenic and androgenic effects and their elimination using ozone, and the characterization of microplastic particles from environmental samples. This year's Willy Hager Prize winner, Dr.-Ing. Timo Pittmann, Stuttgart, and the recipient of this year's doctoral award, Dr. Thorsten Hüffer, Vienna, about her work: ?Production of bioplastics from material flows of a municipal sewage treatment plant? or ?Sorption of organic compounds on carbon-based Nanomaterials - systematic characterization, modeling and application?. This year, the division badge of honor will be given to Professor Dr. Heinz-Jürgen Brauch for his long-term commitment to the Water Chemical Society. Brauch has been a member of the division since 1984 and has supported the work of the Water Chemical Society for many years as an assessor on the board of directors, as a member of the program committee and as an advisory board member in the Water Management Standards Committee. As a public evening lecture, the Water Chemistry Society, in cooperation with the Wiley-VCH publishing house, will be offering the topic of "H 2 O - tapped and originally screwed up" as part of the ChiuZ roadshow on May 2nd at 7 pm. The Berlin chemistry professor Klaus Roth, known for his entertaining lectures, will shed light on the colorful and sometimes shrill world of water on this side and beyond the limits of exact natural sciences with benevolence, critical distance and a large portion of gallows humor. Following the evening lecture in the Welcome Kongresshotel Bamberg, Wiley-VCH invites you to a champagne reception to celebrate the 50th birthday of the magazine Chemie in unserer Zeit, which Roth counts among its most important authors. Further information at www.gdch.de/wasser2016. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It founded 28 specialist groups and sections, including the Water Chemistry Society, in 1926 as the "division für Water chemistry" in the Association of German Chemists. In 1948 it was re-established as the "division Water chemistry" in the GDCh, since 2000 it has been called the "Water Chemistry Society - division in der GDCh". Its approximately 950 members work for effective protection, sensible use, appropriate treatment and purification as well as the proper examination and assessment of the water. The press release 14/16 as PDF for download.

13 The Aktuelle Wochenschau shows 2016: Selected chemical elements under the microscope

13/16
March 16, 2016

Since the beginning of the year the chemical periodic table has been enriched by four elements and now comprises 118 elements. However, only 94 of them occur naturally. And of these, in turn, only 52 can be presented in this year's current newsreel of the German Chemical Society (GDCh). But that's 52 exciting stories! Every week the history of an element is examined and curiosities are described, and very current, surprising applications are shown. Arsenic, one of the most well-known elements, has offered itself as an introductory topic, with considerable space being devoted to its toxicity, but other questionable uses have also been investigated in the past. Today the element takes on important functions in electronic components, for example. The second week goes from arsenic to lead, which the author blames for the downfall of the Romans, which can be convincingly proven. Today everyone can see that in the days of alchemy the conversion of lead into gold did not succeed. The fact that only unleaded petrol is sold at petrol stations is good for health, but it is still used everywhere as an additive in aviation petrol. Gold wasn't just an element of desire for alchemists. For chemists of our time, too, it has come back into focus. Fascinating basic research is currently being carried out on gold nanoparticles, which could result in a wide range of applications in Biology and Medicine , which will be described in the third week by researchers at the Technical University of Munich. It is not surprising that a current article on lithium focuses on the lithium-ion battery. The fourth week explains how such a battery works and how the original concept is evolving. The chapter contains particularly exciting sections which battery concepts based on lithium materials promise success for the future. In the fifth week, the author only mentioned sodium-sulfur batteries for energy storage in passing. His subject is sulfur, and he is fascinated by the unparalleled diversity of homoatomic sulfur compounds. These can occur in various crystalline structures as well as in rings and chains, they can be uncharged, cations or anions and have intense colors. While sulfur is one of the well-known elements, hardly anyone knows europium, despite its fascinating chemistry and important applications of its compounds. It is well known that euro banknotes shine in many colors when they are irradiated with UV light. The five euro banknote with europium in all three UV-active luminescent materials is truly European! Europium opens up a wide field of new phosphors. Until the end of March, the elements germanium, fluorine, copper, silicon, cobalt, yttrium and tin will be dealt with. Week after week 39 more elements will follow until the Aktuelle Wochenschau of the GDCh is expected to conclude with chlorine between Christmas and New Year's Eve and will turn to new chemical topics in 2017. The newsreel contributions are published in a revised form in a GDCh HighChem brochure in the following year. More information at www.aktuelle-wochenschau.de. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. One of her concerns is to make modern chemistry understandable to laypeople and thus to open up connections in natural sciences and technology. She wants to achieve this goal with the current newsreel, which has existed since 2005, and the resulting HighChem brochures. This year the Wöhler Association for Inorganic Chemistry is responsible for the articles in the current newsreel. 790 scientists have come together in this GDCh division in order to further develop their understanding of Inorganic Chemistry and to stimulate research directions and research projects in the field of inorganic chemistry. The press release 13/16 as PDF for download.

12 In the field of tension between basic research and preventive consumer protection - working conference of food chemists in Dresden

12/16
March 9, 2016

Controversial discussions can be expected from the working conference of the Southeast Regional Association of the Food Chemistry Society, which will take place on March 17th and 18th in Dresden and will be attended by around one hundred food scientists, mainly from Saxony, Saxony-Anhalt and Thuringia. The 22 lectures deal with the release of nickel, chromium and cobalt from costume jewelry and piercings, bisphenol-A in contact with food, tests of food for pesticide residues and "veggie food". The nationwide monitoring plan (BÜP) aims to monitor compliance with legal requirements, such as limit values. The Federal Office for Consumer Protection and Food Safety presented the data collected in 2014 in Report 10.2 at the end of 2015 as a joint report by the federal government and the federal states on food safety. A lecture in Dresden compares the latest results on the release of nickel from fashion jewelry with those from the BÜP program of 2008 - also taking into account a correction of the test procedure that came into force in 2013. In addition, the release of chromium and cobalt was measured, since contact allergies were described for both elements. In 2014, 14 federal states took part in the BÜP. 556 samples were examined and reported using the specified method. For 132 samples, a limit value for nickel release of 0.2 micrograms per cubic centimeter per week applies to ear studs and piercings, for 304 samples as jewelry or closures a limit value of 0.5 micrograms per cubic centimeter per week applies. 23.5 percent of the measured values from connector samples and 6.3 percent of the measured values from jewelry were above the limit values. Compared to the data collected in 2008, there was a clear improvement for jewelry parts, but only a slight improvement for plugs and piercings. Therefore, the relationship between material composition and nickel release must be examined more closely in the future. A release of chromium and cobalt was not found in the majority of the samples. In individual cases, however, significantly higher amounts were released than with nickel. Bisphenol-A (BPA) is a chemical that is used, among other things, to manufacture food contact materials from polycarbonate plastics or coated metal packaging such as food cans or screw-on lids. Although numerous scientific studies on the Toxicology and endocrine effectiveness of BPA have already been carried out, its safety has not yet been proven beyond doubt. In its 2015 updated opinion, EFSA, the European Food Safety Authority, rates the health risk posed by BPA as negative for all population groups. However, the use of BPA in polycarbonate drinking bottles for infants was banned as early as 2011. In Denmark, Belgium and Sweden, the precautionary principle is a ban on BPA in food contact materials for babies and young children. France wants to extend the ban to all food packaging. The current inconsistent assessment of BPA makes it difficult to deal with, both for industry and for monitoring and consumers. A general ban on BPA in the food sector is currently difficult to implement because there are no coating systems with a range of applications and product compatibility that are comparable. BPA can also get into food and thus into people via thermal paper. In Germany, monomeric BPA is used as a color developer in almost 50 percent of thermal papers. Via the recycling process, it ends up in paper and cardboard food packaging. A ban on BPA in contact with food could therefore only be achieved in combination with a ban on other applications. At least for thermal papers, there are also alternative color developers that are said to be potentially harmless to humans. And what about pesticide residues in food? In the course of official Food monitoring monitoring in the Free State of Saxony, for example, over 1,000 samples of plant and animal foods are examined for pesticide residues every year. The aim is the random and risk-oriented control of compliance with the statutory maximum residue levels and the collection of representative data in order to be able to estimate the exposure of the population. A lecture explains how a modern residue laboratory works and reports on interesting case studies (e.g. tea and wine) from the practice of official Food monitoring monitoring. Current questions about ?veggie food? are explained in Dresden, especially taking into account additives and vegan agriculture. There are many reasons for choosing a vegetarian or vegan lifestyle: factory farming, animal transport and slaughtering methods, or health, religious, ethical and moral reasons. The food manufacturers now offer a wide range of vegetarian and vegan "meat products". Not only such products, but also naturally vegan products, such as those found in beverages, sweets or cereal products, are advertised with various ?vegan seals?. Vegans criticize the fact that substances that are added to food are often not taken into account as to whether they are of animal or vegetable origin. These and other topics will lead to interesting discussions in the area of tension between basic research and preventive consumer protection. Further information can be found at

https://www.gdch.de/netzwerk-struktur/fachstruktur/lebensmittelchemische-gesellschaft/regionalverbaende.html . The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the Food Chemistry Society, whose task it is to promote the exchange of ideas in the field of Food Chemistry and its related disciplines and to provide technical suggestions. For this purpose, among other things, conferences of the six regional associations are held. With almost 2,900 members, the Food Chemistry Society is the largest division in the GDCh. It organizes the German Food Chemists' Day every year - this year from September 12th to 14th in Freising-Weihenstephan. <a target="_blank" href="t3://file?uid=27532">The press release 12/16 as PDF for download.</a>

11 Awarding of the Ars legendi Faculty Prize - Excellent university teachers are honored

11/13
March 3, 2016

The Ars legendi faculty award for excellent University teaching teaching in mathematics and the natural sciences goes to Dr. Dorothea Kaufmann from the Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg (Biosciences), to Professor Dr. Richard Göttlich, Professor Dr. Siegfried Schindler and Junior Professor Dr. Nicole Graulich from the Justus Liebig University Gießen (chemistry), to Professor Dr. Ilka Agricola from the Philipps University of Marburg (mathematics) and to Dr. Frederic Schuller from the Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nürnberg (Physics). With the Ars legendi Faculty Prize in Mathematics and the Natural Sciences, scientists are honored for outstanding, innovative and exemplary achievements in teaching, advice and support. In 2016, the prize was awarded for the third time by the Stifterverband für die Deutsche Wissenschaft, the German Chemical Society, the German Mathematicians Association, the German Physical Society and the Association for Biology, Biosciences and Biomedicine in Germany. The award ceremony will take place on April 5, 2016 in Frankfurt am Main. The winners receive 5,000 euros per category. The four best concepts were selected by a ten-person jury made up of specialist representatives, representatives from university didactics and students, chaired by the GDCh President, Professor Dr. Thisbe K. Lindhorst, selected. All award winners are characterized by their outstanding commitment to University teaching teaching. To be honored:

     

  • In the Life Sciences category: Dr. Dorothea Kaufmann from the Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg. As a lecturer and study coordinator, she developed an overall concept consisting of the earliest research orientation, an extensive range of courses with external lecturers, continuous further development of teaching content, as well as "peer-based learning" and the strengthening of student self-responsibility.
  • In the chemistry category: Professor Dr. Richard Göttlich, Professor Dr. Siegfried Schindler and Junior Professor Dr. Nicole Graulich from the Justus Liebig University in Giessen. They developed new types of modules, such as ?Chemistry in Cyberspace?, which give students specific freedom for self-determined work and learning. The modules promote creativity and make use of the connection to later everyday work - be it for future chemistry teachers or researchers. The team deliberately uses e-learning methods, develops new concepts and demands individual elaborations from the students in the form of exams such as videos, posters, comics or interviews.
  • In the Mathematics category: Professor Dr. Ilka Agricola from the Philipps University of Marburg. The lecturer and dean has revived the long-forgotten mathematical model collection and uses the models actively and very successfully in mathematical lectures and seminars. Using the model collection makes mathematics tangible and enables students to experience the subject.
  • In the Physics category: Dr. Frederic Schuller from the Friedrich-Alexander University Erlangen-Nuremberg. The lecturer and coordinator of the Physics research course combines high technical standards with rousing lectures in his teaching. Its innovative formats such as the seminar ?Introduction to Research in Physics? on current research and the event series ?ZZZ - Back to the Contexts? encourage active engagement with Physics .

"It was impressive to see how knowledgeable the interdisciplinary jury discussed the many outstanding nominations," says jury chairman Thisbe K. Lindhorst, President of the German Chemical Society. ?And it was inspiring to see what University teaching teaching can be, I took a lot of suggestions myself.? The ceremonial awarding of the Ars legendi faculty prizes will take place in the press on April 5, 2016 at 5:00 pm in Frankfurt am Main, in the ScienceCenter "Experiminta", Hamburger Allee 22. Please register by March 31 at l.rubner@gdch.de. The keynote lecture entitled ?The chemical secret of a Stradivarius? will be given by Professor Dr. Klaus Roth, FU Berlin. Press contact Stifterverband:
Peggy Great
Tel .: (030) 32 29 82 - 530
E-Mail: peggy.gross@stifterverband.de The press release 11/16 as PDF for download.

10 From gluten to flavors to toys - vital Food Chemistry

10/16
March 2, 2016

Food safety, food analysis, sensor technology and physiology are the main topics during the 67th working conference of the Bavarian Regional Association of the Food Chemical Society on March 10th in Erlangen. Discussions include tests for gluten in food, analytical studies on wheat flour, which are important for making dough and baking bread, as well as Flavorings from fruits and mushrooms and odor-intensive substances in toys. Celiac disease is one of the most widespread food hypersensitivities, with an incidence of approximately one percent of the population worldwide. Celiac disease is triggered by certain proteins in wheat, rye, barley and possibly also oats, which are summarized under the term ?gluten?. Celiac sufferers have to avoid gluten-containing products for life and should not exceed a daily intake of 20 mg gluten. Immunochemical tests are currently the method of choice for gluten analysis because they are specific and sensitive. The ?enzyme-linked immunosorbent assay? (ELISA) is common. The commercially available ELISA kits differ in a few points, but mainly in the use of different antibodies. Therefore, four commercially available ELISA kits for gluten determination were examined more closely. Different gluten fractions from foods gave varying results within one ELISA kit, just as different kits produced different results within one gluten fraction. In addition, the sensitivities and specificities to gluten from wheat, rye and barley differed from one another. As a rule, the gluten content was determined to be too high or - to be taken seriously for people with celiac disease - too low. It is therefore important to carefully analyze the variability of the results. It is particularly difficult to correctly determine the gluten content if the origin of the gluten is unknown. For those with celiac disease, one can only hope that foods labeled as ?gluten-free? actually contain no gluten. But what exactly is gluten? Gluten, colloquially known as gluten, ensures that flour is bakeable and is essential for the production of bread (except for flatbread). From a chemical point of view, gluten is made up of prolamines and glutenins, known in wheat as gliadins and glutenins. Both are protein mixtures that make up the largest proportion of protein in wheat flour in a ratio of approx. 1.5: 1. Another lecture will report on new results on the investigation of the structure and composition of HMW gliadins from wheat. These high molecular weight gliadins make up about 25% of the gliadin fraction, and the amazing thing is that little is known about their structure and composition. With the help of different chromatographic separation techniques and subsequent mass spectrometric analysis, it was possible to elicit further secrets from these substances. It now seems certain that the structure of the HMW gliadins already changes during the production of the dough. Wheat flour is once again the focus of the conference , more precisely the Puroindoline (PIN). These are wheat proteins that are bound to the surface of the starch grains. Although it is known which PIN variants are present in the various wheat varieties, information on their contents is sparse. However, since it is assumed that the PIN concentrations correlate with the baking quality of a wheat variety, a well-known analytical method - high-performance liquid chromatography coupled with mass spectrometry - has been further developed so that reliable information on the quantification of PIN can be expected soon. The main topic of the event, the sensor technology of food, also comes up with exciting new results. For example, volatile constituents from eight different types of black currant have been investigated over the past two years. Genetic and age-related influences on the composition of the volatile ingredients, including C6 hydrocarbons, esters and terpenes, were shown. For the first time, it was possible to identify 4-methoxy-2-methyl-2-butanethiol (?cat urine grade?), the smell of which contributes to the typical overall aroma. The ease of cultivation and the attractive aroma mean that the production of some edible mushrooms is increasing worldwide. This also includes the shiitake mushrooms, which have at least 42 aromatic compounds when fried. I.a. give the mushrooms Maggi-like, caramel-like, honey-like or metallic notes. Since the food chemists also take care of the harmlessness of consumer goods, the subject of characterization of odor-active substances in children's products is taken up in Erlangen and the question is asked when the threshold for odor nuisance is exceeded. The product range of toys is constantly expanding and the variety of materials is increasing. And there are some products, some of which have massive odors. When do they become disruptive or hazardous to health? In order to answer this question, the smells have to be researched on a molecular level and then systematic studies carried out in the various stages of development of the children. The molecular identification of the active substances is in full swing. "Selected examples of substances that can come from incomplete polymerization steps in plastics synthesis, from unsuitable catalysts, from contaminated additives or from contaminated coloring components will be presented in Erlangen," said the chairman of the Bavarian Regional Association, Dr. Michael Granvogl. Further information can be found at

https://www.gdch.de/netzwerk-struktur/fachstruktur/lebensmittelchemische-gesellschaft/regionalverbaende.html . The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the Food Chemistry Society, whose task it is to promote the exchange of ideas in the field of Food Chemistry and its related disciplines and to provide technical suggestions. For this purpose, among other things, conferences of the six regional associations are held. With almost 2,900 members, the Food Chemistry Society is the largest division in the GDCh. It organizes the German Food Chemists' Day every year - this year from September 12th to 14th in Freising-Weihenstephan. <a target="_blank" href="t3://file?uid=27320">The press release 10/16 as PDF for download.</a>

09 Nanoparticles that get under your skin and much more Food chemists are also discussing beer

09/2016
March 1, 2016

On March 9, 2016, around 120 food scientists from research, industry and trade laboratories will meet for a working conference of the Food Chemistry Society of North Rhine-Westphalia at the Niederrhein University of Applied Sciences in Mönchengladbach and discuss new findings on the effects of food ingredients on humans. The extent to which selected cocoa ingredients are able to lower blood pressure in healthy people with an increased risk of cardiovascular disease, and what the state of research on the protective effects of plant ingredients looks like after years of intensive research, is also discussed, as is the antioxidant properties of fruit. and vegetable smoothies, which can be helpful for human health. Finally, for marketing it must be asked how such foods can be produced in order to achieve sufficient storage stability and shelf life. Food chemists and nutritionists from the Niederrhein University of Applied Sciences will give their respective points of view. State-certified food chemists are also experts in consumer health protection and provide challenging new analytical techniques to record potentially hazardous substances and to evaluate them toxicologically and legally. Fast and innovative techniques for identifying mold toxins in human blood are being developed in order to record the exposure situation based on coffee, for example. Nanoparticles and heavy metals in tattoo inks must also be examined because these substances are transported deep into the skin, where they can still have unclear negative effects on human health. State-certified food chemists are a valuable help with official food controls on site; They support monitoring and the economy with their well-founded legal expertise and ensure quality in the food manufacturing industry. This is made clear by the conference session on professional competence and vocational training. The Young Food Chemists working group will offer a one-hour workshop as part of the conference . A panel discussion on "500 years of the German Purity Law" will deal with the question of whether the oldest food law, which was enacted in Ingolstadt on April 23, 1516, is a cultural asset worthy of protection or an outdated discrimination against the German beer market. Representatives from business, research and monitoring work together to think about the purity of German beer. Will glyphosate also be discussed? All interested conference participants are cordially invited to this public discussion. It will take place at 12:45 p.m. in building O E02 of the Niederrhein University of Applied Sciences, Department of Oecotrophology, Rheydterstr. 277, in Mönchen-gladbach. The actual conference location is the Audimax V2 of the Niederrhein University of Applied Sciences, Webschulstr. 41-43, Mönchengladbach. Further information can be found at www.gdch.de/netzwerk-struktur/fachstruktur/lebensmittelchemische-gesellschaft/regionalverbaende.html. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the Food Chemistry Society, whose task it is to promote the exchange of ideas in the field of Food Chemistry and its related disciplines and to provide technical suggestions. For this purpose, among other things, conferences of the six regional associations are held. With almost 2,900 members, the Food Chemistry Society is the largest division in the GDCh. It organizes the German Food Chemists' Day every year - this year from September 12th to 14th in Freising-Weihenstephan. The press release 09/2016 as PDF for download.

08 Using visible light for chemical reactions - David C. Fabry receives Carl Roth sponsorship award

08/16
March 1, 2016

The German Chemical Society (GDCh) awards David C. Fabry, RWTH Aachen University, the Carl Roth Prize. Fabry is honored for his extensive and innovative work on photoredox catalysis, in particular his development of a novel oxidative CH activation using visible light. The GDCh President, Professor Dr. Thisbe K. Lindhorst, University of Kiel, on March 17th in Kiel at the spring symposium of the GDCh-JungChemikerForum. In photoredox catalysis, organic molecules are usually colorless and only absorb UV light, and dyes are added as photocatalysts or sensitizers. These absorb visible light. The energy or electron transfer from the dye to the organic molecules can then trigger their chemical reaction. Fabry used this effect in his research and developed a new method for oxidative CH activation. For his work, the 29-year-old receives the Carl-Roth-Förderpreis endowed with 5000 euros, which the GDCh awards to young chemists who develop resource-saving synthetic routes or use chemicals innovatively. This award is financed by Carl Roth GmbH & Co. KG. The company, which sells laboratory supplies as well as selected products for life science and chemicals, is contributing an additional 3,000 euros in the form of a voucher that the award winner can use to shop at Carl Roth. David C. Fabry, born in Neuss, studied chemistry at RWTH Aachen, where he is currently doing his doctorate. He completed his master?s degree with distinction. He has already conducted research at Oxford University, GB, as part of guest stays. For a stay in the USA at the Scripps Research Institute, La Jolla, California, he received a full scholarship from the German Academic Exchange Service (DAAD). Fabry has eleven publications, four of which he wrote during his master's degree. The German Chemical Society is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of new scientific knowledge. The GDCh has 28 specialist groups and sections as well as 61 local associations. Regional young chemists forums have been established at 53 university locations. The press release 08/16 for download as a PDF.

07 Veggie food and aluminum as hot topics - In the focus of Food Chemistry: origin and authenticity

07/16
February 29, 2016

Current problems related to veggie food and aluminum content in foods that come from contact materials are among the "hot topics" that the Regional Association Southwest of the Food Chemistry Society will discuss on March 8 and 9, 2016 in the Freiburg Regional Council . The central topic for the Southwest German food chemists, however, is biochemical and molecular biological analysis for the verification of the origin and authenticity of foods of animal and vegetable origin. The number of vegetarians in Germany has increased in recent years. It is currently estimated that around 7 million Germans have a vegetarian diet; the number of vegans should be around 900,000 people. The food manufacturers have and are adapting to this development, supplementing their ranges with products for vegetarians. There are vegan ?cheese?, vegetarian ?meat products?, vegetarian ?caviar?, vegan ?coffee whiteners? and more on the market. In Freiburg, potential food law regulations are being discussed that have not yet existed for vegetarian or vegan products. In terms of quantity, aluminum is the third most abundant element and the most abundant metal in the earth's crust. Despite its frequent occurrence in nature, according to the current state of knowledge, no human or animal organism is known that requires aluminum for the maintenance of its bodily functions. Possible health risks from aluminum include adverse effects on the blood-forming system, nervous system, and bones. The EFSA has evaluated aluminum toxicologically and derived a tolerable weekly intake (TWI) of 1 mg / kg body weight for all groups of people. Food contact materials containing aluminum (e.g. drinking bottles, espresso makers, aluminum bowls, etc.) are widely used in private households. But how much aluminum is actually transferred from these materials to food? This question has not yet been clarified, but is currently the reason for intensive investigations, such as those carried out at the Hessian State Laboratory in cooperation with the University of Giessen. In Freiburg, experts from industry, monitoring and private laboratories will also provide answers to the questions: Does the fish in the pan actually come from the fishing area, as declared on the packaging, and is it the type of fish that the consumer wanted? How honestly does the trade work? Can you trust organically produced food of animal origin? How can you monitor the origin of plant foods? How can you differentiate between types of grain, coffee or honey? As the question of the origin and authenticity of food is becoming more and more important, the contact point for the EU's Food Fraud Network has recently been set up at the Federal Office for Food Safety and Consumer Protection. Ergot alkaloids, also called ergot alkaloids, are metabolic products of parasitic fungi such as Claviceps purpurea. They are formed in the sclerotia ("mother grains"), the permanent form of mushrooms, which mainly grow on rye, but also occur on other grains. Depending on the dose, ergot alkaloids have a strong toxic effect and cause mild to severe damage to health. Despite the known toxicity and the pollution that is still present today, especially in rye grain, rye flours and products with a high rye content, there is no maximum quantity regulation for grain-based foods, either nationally or across Europe. In the European Union, however, efforts have been made for years to regulate the total alkaloid content of cereals and / or marketable foods. The composition and the content of the individual ergot alkaloids are actually not relevant, and the use of a sum parameter would be a logical and effective new method approach. The planar solid phase extraction was used as a suitable concept for quick and easy screening to determine the total alkaloid content, which was recently successfully introduced for pesticide analysis in fruit, vegetables and tea and which is based on the very efficient, inexpensive and valid high-performance thin-layer chromatography. Further information can be found at

https://www.gdch.de/netzwerk-struktur/fachstruktur/lebensmittelchemische-gesellschaft/regionalverbaende.html . The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the Food Chemistry Society, whose task it is to promote the exchange of ideas in the field of Food Chemistry and its related disciplines and to provide technical suggestions. For this purpose, among other things, conferences of the six regional associations are held. With almost 2,900 members, the Food Chemistry Society is the largest division in the GDCh. It organizes the German Food Chemists' Day every year - this year from September 12th to 14th in Freising-Weihenstephan. <a target="_blank" href="t3://file?uid=27281">The press release 07/16 as PDF for download.</a>

06 Food Chemistry: no knowledge without analytics - major advances through metabolomics technology

06/16
February 26, 2016

When food chemists meet for a workshop, new, more precise and safer chemical analysis methods are usually the focus. Only the analysis provides information about which ingredients a food consists of. Now a new method is revolutionizing the analysis of ingredients: metabolomics technology. At the working conference of food chemists from Berlin, Brandenburg and Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania, who form the Northeast Regional Association of the Food Chemical Society and meet on March 7th in Berlin, the chemist Professor Dr. Lothar Willmitzer from the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Plant Physiology, Potsdam, presented this new technology. With it it is possible to detect several thousand ingredients. "We are very pleased that we were able to win Mr. Willmitzer to give a lecture on 'Metabolomics - a new approach in food analysis'", says Dr. Susanne Pieper, Chairwoman of the Northeast Regional Association. ?He will present work on mass spectroscopy-based metabolomics technology that began at his institute in the late 1990s and can now be used for authenticity tests on foodstuffs with unsurpassed precision and high reproducibility.? Willmitzer will go into the measurement of 1,400 wine samples that came from 15 different countries with different growing areas and comprised 30 different varieties and up to three different vintages. In addition to lectures on the occurrence, extraction and use of essential oils, on the question of "Taste from nature - fiction or reality?" And on "Naturalness, nature, organic" with experience in the assessment of organic fruit and vegetables, there are current studies from basic research on the conference program. For example, rearrangements of the D-fructose molecule, which are catalyzed by amino acids, were examined with the aid of dynamic NMR Spectroscopy . The temperature and pH-dependent composition of the structural isomers of D-fructose leads to different reactivities at the molecular level, which plays a physiological role. And fructose is not only found in pome fruit, berries and exotic fruits, but is also used industrially as a sweetener. Research continues to focus on melanoidins, end products of the Maillard reaction that takes place during cooking and frying and in which reducing carbohydrates, such as maltose, react with amino compounds. The high molecular weight melanoidins determine color and aroma, but are structurally difficult for food analysts to grasp. The conference shows that further research is worthwhile; because it is not only about the quality and taste of the processed food, but also about possible antioxidant and antimicrobial properties that are ascribed to the melanoidins. Further information can be found on the homepage of the German Chemical Society (GDCh) at www.gdch.de/lchg. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the Food Chemistry Society, whose task it is to promote the exchange of ideas in the field of Food Chemistry and its related disciplines and to provide technical suggestions. For this purpose, among other things, conferences of the six regional associations are held. With almost 2,900 members, the Food Chemistry Society is the largest division in the GDCh. It organizes the German Food Chemists' Day every year - this year from September 12th to 14th in Freising-Weihenstephan. The press release 06/16 as PDF for download.

05 Chemistry lecturers' conference in Heidelberg - Wikipedia chemistry editorial team receives journalist award

05/16
February 25, 2016

The German Chemical Society (GDCh) awards the Chemistry editors of Wikipedia the GDCh Prize for journalists and writers. On the occasion of the chemistry lecturer conference 2016, which will take place from March 21 to 23 in Heidelberg, the Carl Duisberg Memorial Prize will also be given to Professor Dr. Felix R. Fischer, University of California, Berkeley, and honorary membership to the former GDCh President Professor Dr. Dieter Jahn awarded. The Association of German University Professors of Chemistry (ADUC) of the GDCh, which organizes this conference , also awards three young scientists with the ADUC habilitation prizes. Every year, professors from the chemistry faculties from Germany and neighboring countries come together for the chemistry lecturers' conference to find out about news in research and teaching and to exchange ideas on an international level. The topics of the conference include current knowledge and research results from all fields of chemistry as well as didactic developments and new approaches to conveying complex issues in University teaching teaching. At the conference , outstanding chemists will also be awarded GDCh prizes. For example, at the ceremony on March 22nd, the Chemistry editors of Wikipedia received the GDCh Prize for journalists and writers endowed with ? 7,500 for the convincing quality of the presentation of chemistry in the Wikipedia online lexicon. With their work, the editorial team ensures that chemistry is brought closer to the general public in an informative and understandable manner. In doing so, she succeeds in providing excellent information on issues relating to chemistry and their solutions. Professor Dr. Dieter Jahn was awarded honorary membership. This highest award of the GDCh is given to scientists for outstanding services to the promotion of chemistry and to the goals of the GDCh. Jahn, who has been a GDCh member since 1977 and was President of the Society in 2006/2007, has always shown a special commitment to the interests of chemistry and has shown great energy and ingenuity in the process. This is shown, for example, by his contributions to education policy, especially in the area of promoting young talent, and also by his great personal commitment to the subject of ?Chemistry and Energy?. Jahn was born in Neresheim / Ostalbkreis in 1951 and completed his chemistry studies at the University of Stuttgart with a doctorate in 1978. In 1979 he began his Career in industry as laboratory manager at BASF, where he rose through various management positions until he retired in 2012 to become Head of the Global Competence Center Science Relations and Innovation Management of the BASF Group. At the same time, he was a member of the advisory board of BASF Venture Capital GmbH until he left. Jahn performed numerous activities and functions at universities, in advisory committees, juries and initiative groups. He is currently the knowledge transfer ambassador of the state of Rhineland-Palatinate in materials research and chairman of the University Council of the University of Konstanz. The Carl Duisberg Memorial Prize goes to Professor Dr. Felix R. Fischer, University of California, Berkeley. The award, which is endowed with 7,500 euros, supports young academics in chemistry. The 35-year-old chemist convinced the selection committee with the quality and originality of his publications as well as the methodological and content-related breadth of his research in the field of physical organic chemistry. His research focuses on the rational design of novel organic functional materials for applications in molecular electronics, such as in field effect transistors, solar cells and single molecule sensors. Fischer, who studied chemistry at the Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg, received his doctorate in 2008 from the Swiss Federal Institute of Technology in Zurich. After a three-year postdoctoral stay at Columbia University New York, he has been researching and teaching at the University of California, Berkeley since 2011. This year, the ADUC three post- doctoral candidates from different areas of chemistry for particularly original and scientifically significant publications: Junior professor Dr. Annette Andrieu-Brunsen, Technische Universität Darmstadt, receives an ADUC-Habilitanden-Preis in recognition of her work, with which she carried out functionalizations in mesopores in a spatially resolved manner and below the optical diffraction limit. Dr. Inke Siewert, Georg-August-Universität Göttingen, is honored for her work on the development of novel, homogeneous electrocatalysts for proton reduction to H2, for water oxidation and for CO2 reduction. And Dr. Thomas Magauer, Ludwig-Maximilians-Universität München, is awarded for his work on the innovative synthesis of a whole class of bioactive natural substances (leucosceptroids) for potential application in crop protection as well as for the development of a novel method for the production of fluorinated aromatics and innovative gold (l) -catalyzed cascade reactions. Further information can be found at www.gdch.de/cdt2016. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It has 28 specialist groups and sections and awards numerous prizes for special achievements in chemical research. Up to three post-doctoral candidates from all areas of chemistry are honored annually for particularly original and scientifically significant publications by the traditional Association of German University Professors of Chemistry (ADUC) , which is part of the GDCh. The press release 05/16 as PDF for download.

04 When there is a lack of effective drugs - Medicinal Chemistry is a beacon of hope

04/16
February 24, 2016

Because of their molecular diversity, natural substances are experiencing a renaissance when it comes to discovering effective drugs. The screening of large collections of synthetic molecules, so-called molecular libraries, has been disappointing in practice, according to Professor Ronald J. Quinn of the Eskitis Institute for Drug Discovery at Griffith University in Brisbane, Australia. He will give the opening lecture at the ?Frontiers in Medicinal Chemistry? conference on March 13, 2016 in Bonn. Quinn makes it clear what medical chemistry is all about, namely identifying those molecules that are complementary to the surface of macromolecular target substances in the body that cause the symptoms of the disease. In addition to the search for these target substances and drug lead structures, the lectures at the four-day conference look at protein-protein interactions, the ?antibiotic crisis? and new findings in structural Biology . Special highlights are the awards for eight younger scientists who have made exemplary achievements in the field of medicinal chemistry. It all starts on March 15 with the awarding of three Klaus Grohe prizes by the foundation of the same name, which is part of the German Chemical Society (GDCh). Prize winners are Dr. Daniel T. Hog, who studied chemistry in Münster and Munich and, after a one-year stay at Harvard University, is now laboratory manager at Bayer Pharma in Berlin. He will turn 31 on the day of the award ceremony. Dr. Nicole Nischan (30) studied chemistry in Dresden, completed her doctoral thesis in Berlin at the Humboldt and Freie Universität as well as at the Leibniz Institute for Molecular Pharmacology and has been researching at the University of Texas Southwestern Medical Center in Dallas since last year. Dr. Dietmar Weichert (32) is a trained pharmacist who did his doctorate in the field of pharmaceutical / medicinal chemistry at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg. Among other things, he had a research stay at Stanford University. He is currently working at Trinity College in Dublin in the world's leading research group in the field of the development and application of innovative processes for the crystallization of membrane proteins. He is honored for his work on G-protein-coupled receptors, which are among the most important switching points in the organism and, as membrane proteins, are responsible for signal transmission between the outside and the inside of a cell. Nicole Nischan is honored for her work on the site-specific modification of peptides and proteins in order to produce and evaluate functional biomolecules. Daniel T. Hog has developed highly efficient synthesis strategies for natural products which, despite their high biological relevance, were not or only with great difficulty accessible fully synthetically. The Klaus Grohe Prize is endowed with 2,000 euros. The innovation prize in medical / pharmaceutical chemistry, endowed with 5,000 euros, is shared this year by Dr. Dennis Schade (36), Junior Research Group Leader Medicinal Chemistry at the Technical University of Dortmund, and Dr. Andreas Koeberle (34), Head of the Lipidomics Facility at the Department of Pharmaceutical / Medicinal Chemistry at the University of Jena. Schade received the award for the rational development, synthesis and characterization of low molecular weight substances, especially for cardiovascular indications. Current work is concerned with the development of small-molecule stem cell modulators for the regeneration of heart muscle tissue. Schade studied Pharmacy in Kiel, where he did his doctorate in pharmaceutical chemistry. Koeberle is doing pioneering work in the decryption of lipid networks with the aim of intervening pharmacologically in the lipid profile, and thus works at the interface between cancer, inflammation and the immune system. Koeberle studied Biochemistry in Tübingen, where he did his doctorate in pharmaceutical chemistry. The GDCh division Medicinal Chemistry and the division for Pharmaceutical / Medicinal Chemistry the German Pharmaceutical Society Write the innovation prize jointly. You are also, together with the Société de Chimie Thérapeutique, the organizer of the international conference in Bonn, to which over 250 participants are expected. The doctoral prize in the field of medical / pharmaceutical chemistry has been awarded by the GDCh Medicinal Chemistry division since 2013 to three scientists each, who each receive 500 euros as prize money. In 2016 these are Dr. Matthias Gehringer (31) from ETH Zurich, Dr. Christine K. Maurer (30) from the Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research in Saarbrücken and Dr. Alexander Metz, University of Marburg (37). Like all award winners in Bonn, you have the opportunity to present your work in lectures. Further information can be found at: www.gdch.de/medchem2016. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the Medicinal Chemistry division . It has existed since 1971 and has over 800 members. These work in university institutes, other research institutions and in the pharmaceutical industry. They are mainly chemists and pharmacists, but also computer scientists, process engineers and others. The division aims to bridge the gap between chemistry on the one hand and Biology, Medicine and Pharmacy on the other. The press release 04/16 as PDF for download.

03 Conference by and for young scientists - 18th spring symposium of the JungChemikerForum

03/16
4th February 2016

?Chemistry at the Seaside? is the motto of the 18th spring symposium of the JungChemikerForum (JCF) of the German Chemical Society (GDCh). From March 16 to 19, 2016, over 300 young scientists from 13 nations will come together at the Christian-Albrechts-Universität zu Kiel to present their research to a young and critical audience. In addition to a top-class scientific program and over 200 poster contributions, a colorful supporting program invites visitors to get to know Kiel better. The JCF Spring Symposium, which has been taking place for 18 years, is one of the largest conferences in Europe by and for young scientists and is organized annually by changing regional young chemists forums of the GDCh. This year JCF Kiel took over the organization and created a varied program for the three-day event. Renowned international scientists have been won over for the plenary lectures. The final lecture will be given by Professor Dr. Tunga Salthammer, Fraunhofer Institute for Wood Research in Braunschweig, who is already known for his scientific lectures on "The Chemistry in Breaking Bad and Other Films". The topic of his lecture entitled "The Air that I breeze" is chemical pollutants in indoor spaces. In addition, young chemists from all over Europe will have the opportunity to present their research in lectures at the JCF Spring Symposium. Poster sessions offer students and doctoral candidates from all areas of chemistry and related natural sciences the opportunity for professional exchange. Individual posters are announced through three-minute poster presentations. In addition, the poster and lecture award winners are honored - after evaluation by the participants. As a special highlight, the Carl Roth Prize will also be awarded at the conference. The symposium is rounded off by numerous workshops, excursions and a varied evening program. A special cooperation partner this year is the GDCh magazine "Chemie in unserer Zeit (ChiuZ)", which will appear in its 50th year in 2016 and for this reason supports the symposium with a poster session and the "ChiuZ Storylab" workshop. The final lecture is also part of the so-called ChiuZ roadshow, which takes place on the occasion of the anniversary. Further information can be found at www.jcf-fruehjahrssymposium.de.

The German Chemical Society is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of new scientific knowledge. The GDCh supports the creation of networks, transdisciplinary and international cooperation and continuous education and training in schools, universities and in the professional environment. The GDCh has 28 specialist groups and sections as well as 61 local associations and young chemist forums at 53 university locations. The JCF forms a nationwide platform for over 10,000 young members of the GDCh.

The press release 03/16 as PDF for download.

02 Thinking about values for chemistry is in demand

02/16
January 11, 2016

Professor Dr. Thisbe K. Lindhorst, President of the German Chemical Society (GDCh) since January 1, introduces the motto of her two-year presidency in her New Year's greeting in the chemical Nachrichten aus der Chemie : ?Thinking about values for chemistry?. The new GDCh President, a university professor in Kiel, would like to encourage chemists to deal with questions that lie beyond their specialty. She calls on her colleagues in science and industry to think about what chemistry can and must do for life in the future, what it should do and what it should not do. ?I'm not saying that value thinking is a new discipline in chemistry. On the contrary, I want to tie in with the value thinking that has taken place again and again in our specialist society. More recently: the code of conduct, which is anchored in our statutes ... and the initiative of our last president, Thomas Geelhaar, "Chemistry and Society", which has led to a new working group in the GDCh, "said Lindhorst in issue 1/2016 the Nachrichten aus der Chemie. Finally, Lindhorst goes into the importance of international exchange: ?We will benefit from the international contacts that are part of our chemistry like water to fish and that are truly limitless. Here, science is really exemplary beyond its specialist boundaries. There she exemplifies how different points of view inspire us, how diversity inspires us and the interest in vital chemistry connects people across national borders. ?With over 31,000 members, the German Chemical Society is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of new scientific knowledge. The GDCh supports the creation of networks, transdisciplinary and international cooperation and continuous education and training in schools, universities and in the professional environment. The GDCh has 28 specialist groups and sections as well as 60 local associations. Note to the editors: We will be happy to send you a photo of the new president immediately upon request. Information on the person can be found in the press release of September 23, 2015:

https://www.gdch.de/service-information/oeffentlichkeitsarbeit/pressenotizen/archiv-gdch-2015.html . <a target="_blank" href="t3://file?uid=25869">The press release 02/16 as PDF for download.</a>

01 Focus on analytical separation technologies - Ernst Bayer Prize 2015 goes to Marco Nestola

01/16
January 6, 2016

Doctoral students who deal with analytical separation techniques as part of their doctorate will come together from January 10th to 12th, 2016 in Hohenroda (Hersfeld-Rotenburg district) for the 26th doctoral seminar of the Separation Science working group. On the occasion of the conference, this working group within the Analytical Chemistry division of the German Chemical Society (GDCh) awards the Ernst Bayer Prize to young scientists who have published an outstanding publication in the field of analytical separation techniques. This year's award winner is Marco Nestola, who is honored for his work published in 2015 in the journal ?Analytical Chemistry?. It describes the determination of aromatic hydrocarbons in food and cosmetics by means of LC-GC-MS coupling, which Nestola will talk about as part of his lecture in Hohenroda. Liquid chromatography (LC) and gas chromatography (GC) are separation techniques that are widely used in analytical chemistry, with which substances are separated from one another in mixtures and finally identified, mostly with mass spectrometry (MS). These common methods have to be adapted to the respective analytical questions and further developed - a tricky task, especially with complex samples. Nestola's work convinced the selection jury through the novel coupling of an LC-LC method with a GC / MS system. In this way, polycyclic aromatic hydrocarbons (PAHs), which are undesirable because of their toxicity and carcinogenicity and are in some cases prohibited above a certain limit value, can be reliably detected in various foods much faster than before. Since Nestola has almost completely automated the complex sample preparation, the method is already used in routine Food monitoring monitoring. Nestola's award-winning publication emerged from his doctoral thesis, which he is doing as an external doctoral student at the Faculty of Chemistry at the University of Duisburg-Essen. Parallel to his scientific work, he has been working full-time at Axel Semrau since 2012. Last year, Nestola was awarded the prize for the best lecture at the 25th doctoral seminar. This year, 25 doctoral students will again present their current results during the three-day seminar and have the chance to receive the prize for the best lecture. All facets of analytical separation techniques are illuminated again: liquid chromatography, gas chromatography, mass spectrometry, bioanalysis and capillary electrophoresis. Reports from professional life and funding opportunities complement the conference program, for which more than 120 cutting technicians from all over Germany will come together. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with over 31,000 members. It is divided into 27 specialist groups and sections, including the Analytical Chemistry division , which in turn maintains ten working groups, including the Separation Science. Since 2003, the working group has been awarding the Ernst Bayer Prize, named after the multiple award-winning chemist from Tübingen who died in 2002 and who has made a name for himself in the field of chromatographic separation techniques, but also as the long-standing chairman of the advisory committee for environmentally relevant waste materials. The press release 01/16 as PDF for download.

Contact

Dr. Karin J. Schmitz
Head of GDCh-
public relation
pr@gdch.de
Tel. 069 / 7917-493

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