Speakers

Speakers in the context of school partnerships

To make it easier to find the speakers, they are arranged according to the postcode of their place of residence. Open the green triangle for each lecture topic. Alternatively, you can download the complete list of speakers as a PDF.

01097 Dresden: Professor Dr. Horst Boettcher

Hauptstrasse 31
01097 Dresden
hb-dresden@t-online.de

Biocomposites - a highlight of modern materials research

Biocomposites in nature (bones, mussels, etc.), production of technical biocomposites using sol-gel technology, living cells in a ceramic matrix (Biocere), applications for biocatalysis, bioremidation, bioactive coatings for wood and textiles
Duration: 45-60 minutes
Suitable for: School communities, especially for students of advanced science courses

Fascination with new carbon structures

From graphite to graphene, fullerene, carbon tubes and carbon dots: structure, manufacture, properties, applications
Duration: 45-60 minutes
Suitable for: school community, especially for students of advanced science courses

Why are there patents?

History of patent law, what can be patented? How do I write a patent? The way to the granted patent, rights of the patent holder
Duration: 45-60 minutes
Suitable for: School communities, especially for students of advanced science courses

01326 Dresden: Professor Dr. Horst Hartmann

Wollnerstrasse 4
01326 Dresden
hartmann@iapp.de
Internet: http://www.chm.tu-dresden.de/farstoffsammlung.shtml

Dyes through the ages

The history of the "antique purple" dyes
up to the "solar cell" is presented. Duration: 45-60 minutes. Target group: Teachers, high school students and the school community, Young Chemists Forum, members of technical, scientific and artistic training institutions

The Dresden dye collection - contemporary witness of the development of the chemical industry over the past 150 years

Presentation of over 10,000 dye samples from 80 different manufacturers from 1850 to today. Duration: lecture and visit to the collection approx. 90 minutes. Target group: teachers, students from the 6th grade and high school
Upper level, those interested in artistic and design professions, those interested in history, members of technical, scientific and artistic training institutions

Dyeing with natural dyes

Experimental lecture with practical exercises (only possible during the semester break). Duration: half a day. Target group: Teachers, students from the 6th grade and upper school level, those interested in science and art

01723 Wilsdruff: Prof. Dr. Siegfried Niese

Am Silberblick 9
01723 Wilsdruff
Siegfried Niese

Note: The lectures will only be held in the Dresden - Freiberg area

Living with ionizing radiation and radioactivity

Duration: 45-60 minutes
Target group: students and teachers of advanced science courses, school community

About meteorites - What chemical analyzes and radioactivity measurements tell us

Duration: 45-60 minutes
Target group: students and teachers of advanced science courses, school community

04207 Leipzig: Professor Dr. Adolf Zschunke

Rapeseed Route 115
D-04207 Leipzig
Adolf Zschunke

Trade fairs in chemistry

In the lecture , the important terms for measuring in chemistry will be explained:

- metrology. The science of measurement
- The fascination of Libra. Correctness, precision and the original kilogram
- World Metrology Day 10 May 2019. Reorganization of the system of measurement units
- Metrological principles. Reliable standards, original kilograms and recognized reference materials
- measurement uncertainty. Measurement uncertainties and the accuracy of measurements

Target group: Teachers and students of advanced science courses as well as the school community - Duration: 45 - 60 minutes

Concept analysis in chemistry

The lecture covers the following important terms in chemistry:

1. Similarity, equality, identity
2nd element
3. analyte. The selectivity of the method determines the identity of the analyte.
4. Standards. Measurement, calibration and reference materials
5. symmetry. Description of molecular symmetry and stereoisomerism
6. Isomerism. Certain properties define group membership. Hierarchy of the terms isomers, stereomers and chiramers.
7. Topie. Classification of topias according to K. Mislow and M. Raban.

Target group: teachers and students of advanced science courses as well as the school community - duration: 45 - 60 minutes

10551 Berlin: Dr. Heribert Schmitt-Willich

Waldenserstrasse 30
10551 Berlin
email: Heribert Schmitt-Willich

Iodine contrast media for computed tomography (CT)

Historical outline of the development towards modern non-ionic X-ray contrast media (RKM) based on organic iodine compounds - physicochemical requirements for the intravenously administered agents (absorption of X-rays, water solubility, viscosity, compatibility) - chemical aspects of synthesis in the laboratory and during upscaling (annual tonnage production) - areas of application ( Angiography, visualization of soft tissues etc) - barium sulfate as an oral contrast medium - alternatives to iodine as a signaling element? - RKM in the environment
Duration: 45 minutes
Target group: teachers and students in upper secondary school

Gadolinium contrast media for magnetic resonance imaging (MRI)

Principle of MRI - paramagnetic gadolinium ion as a signal transmitter - intravenously administered metal chelates as compatible pharmaceuticals - open-chain and macrocyclic Gd complexes - thermodynamic / kinetic stability - organ-specific contrast media (CM) - insights into the world of interdisciplinary pharmaceutical research in the search for new vivo diagnostics - discussion about the safety of contrast media.
Duration: 45-60 minutes
Target group: teachers and students in upper secondary school

Positron emission tomography (PET) - 18F tracer for the diagnosis of Alzheimer's disease

Basics of molecular imaging - PET-suitable radioisotopes (decay and half-lives) - 18F tracers and their (chemically stable) "precursors" - drug discovery of new pharmaceuticals (medicinal chemistry): Requirements for suitable clinical candidates - PET tracers for Representation of amyloid plaques and tau protein in the brain - clinical PET / CT examinations for the diagnosis or exclusion of Alzheimer's disease - Outlook: therapy for dementia?
Duration: 45-60 minutes
Target group: teachers and students in upper secondary school

Contributions of chemistry to imaging diagnostics: From X-ray and magnetic resonance contrast media to PET tracers

Overview lecture introducing the different techniques of modern clinical imaging (CT, MR, PET) with the focus on the contributions of the (industrial) chemist to the interdisciplinary discovery of active substances of intravenous, clinical contrast media or PET tracers.
Duration: 45-60 minutes
Target group: teachers and students in upper secondary school

10557 Berlin: Dr. Reinhard Damerius

Thomasiusstrasse 25th
10557 Berlin
Reinhard Damerius

Bio-engineering - definition, demarcation, areas of responsibility in pharmaceutical technology

Target group: Students and teachers of advanced science courses, school community, chemistry / biology training
Duration: approx. 90 minutes

The cell as a bioreactor - enzymes, enzymatic reactions in selected examples

Target group: Schoolchildren and teachers of advanced science courses, school community, chemistry / biology training
Duration: approx. 90 minutes

Biotechnological production of active pharmaceutical ingredients using two examples: penicillin and human insulin

Target group: Schoolchildren and teachers of advanced science courses, school community, chemistry / biology training
Duration: approx. 90 minutes

12489 Berlin: Professor Dr. Stefan Hecht

Institute of Chemistry
Humboldt University Berlin
Brook-Taylor-Strasse 2
D-12489 Berlin
sh@chemie.hu-berlin.de
Internet: www.hechtlab.de

Chemistry in computers

Target audience: students, teachers and the school community

13353 Berlin: Prof. Gudrun Kamasch

Prof Gudrun Kamasch (Foto: privat)
Foto: privat

Beuth University of Applied Sciences Berlin
Luxemburger Strasse 10
13353 Berlin
Telephone: 030 4504-2354 (AB)
Gudrun Kammasch

How many people can our earth feed?

Do we all have to become vegetarians?

Humanity grows and grows - but the area of fertile arable land not only remains constant; it even decreases due to erosion, urban sprawl and other influencing factors. Will the amount of greenhouse gases formed, or, to put it simply, the "CO 2 footprint", the yardstick for assessing what should and should be prohibited? Does the enjoyment of a good steak even become an "ecological sin"?

In order to find answers here, one has to think in an interdisciplinary manner and in larger contexts, based on facts. On the basis of the World Agricultural Report, questions of soil fertility and sustainable agriculture are dealt with, aspects of the anthropogenic influence on the climate are discussed and it is considered what really makes a sustainable lifestyle.

Target group: students from 11th grade - duration: 60-90 min

Why is UNESCO interested in engineers?

Cultural monuments, world heritage - these are well-known UNESCO themes. But why are engineers so interesting and important for the global community today? Engineering enables the creation of "technical creatures". We are surrounded by them all around us and they have changed our everyday life in unexpected ways. But can engineers still afford to be interested in technology alone today? In what contexts do technical developments have to be considered today?

More than ever, ethically sound action is required, because we are reaching the limits of the resilience and resources of our mother ship Earth. In 2011, UNESCO called for this in the ?Engineering Initiative?, and in 2013 UN Secretary General Ban Ki-Moon declared that ?Science, Technology and Innovation, STI? are indispensable for the further development of the global community. The development goals drawn up for the period after 2015 have already been defined as ?Sustainable Millennium Development Goals, SDG?.
How important an interdisciplinary, even interdisciplinary approach to technical issues is is explained using various examples. They make it clear that the best minds are required here in order to find sustainable, ie ecologically, socially and economically viable solutions.

Target group: students from 11th grade - duration: 60-90 min

From fake nuts and secret berries

About the jokes nature makes with us!

The experience of "biodiversity" begins in everyday life - for example with food. 75,000 plant species are edible, but today we cover around 90% of the world's food with only 20 plant species.

But what does nature have to offer us and what kind of teasing jokes does it play with us while hiding its true intentions in a playful way?

From the wonderful abundance of plant-based foods, schoolchildren (of all ages) get to know interesting examples of plant-based foods that are important for nutrition. Interesting "secondary plant compounds" can also be dealt with in advanced school levels.

Target group: Every school level, also suitable for elementary school, useful: as further training for teachers - duration: 60-90 min
Note: For this event you have to plan around 25-30 ? for the purchase of plant-based foods. In order to achieve a broad impact, it is advisable to hold a further training course for teachers - because the effort as a guest speaker is quite high and multiple "hires" for a school are only possible to a limited extent.

From lunch to global thinking

Considerations on resource conservation and sustainability

The global protection of our earth's natural resources, which has become necessary, can only be successful if it does not begin with thinking about our own consumption. For example, the rainforests necessary to maintain biodiversity and a balanced climate are cut down on a large scale every day. In their place, the agricultural industry is expanding, often with genetically modified soy, corn and wheat. The whole world is supplied.

Numerous good ideas and realized examples of how one can be active in matters of healthy nutrition, short delivery routes, better food quality, i.e. simply environmental protection, exist all over the world and in the local region. They are intended to illustrate how the United Nations' 2030 Agenda with its 17 Sustainable Development Goals, which serve sustainable development, can be implemented.

Target group: students from 11th grade - duration: 60-90 min

Clara Immerwahr and Fritz Haber

Can we learn from history?

Man can turn around at any moment - says Martin Buber, one of the great thinkers of the 20th century. It is possible to decide differently and to turn back when the voice of conscience stirs!

But we don't often find ourselves in situations in which we lack this "moral courage", or in which, while reading biographies, we wonder why he or she didn't say no - even if it seemed to be safe for life and limb ?

We can learn a lot from the example of the profound conflict between Clara Immerwahr and her husband, Fritz Haber. What stopped Fritz Haber from hearing his wife's voice, her warnings about the consequences of the use of poisonous gases in World War I? And what does that mean for us today?

Perhaps dealing with this side of Nobel Prize winner Fritz Haber is a piece of the mosaic on the way to learning from history and not repeating the same mistakes over and over in human history.

Target group: students from 11th grade - duration: 60-90 min

14195 Berlin: Professor Dr. Klaus Roth

Free University of Berlin
Institute for Chemistry and biochemistry
Takustrasse 3
D-14195 Berlin
Klaus Roth
www.klausroth.de

Sweeteners, the sweet side of chemistry

Sugar substitute. Instead of a chemical success story of sweeteners, a drama begins, the plot of which is determined by economic interest groups, tax legislation, the market, wild smugglers' gangs and the zeitgeist. But also a strong pinch of gripping chemistry. Let's take a closer look at the 10 sweeteners approved in the EU today and we're spoiled for choice.

Target group: students, teachers and the school community - Duration: 45-60 minutes

Tatort Berlin: Berlin blue - its discoverers and traitors

Around 1700 the bear was tapping in Berlin. Bright minds were recruited from all over Europe and poured into the city. They were welcome, you didn't ask about your religion, you let them try their luck. Although alchemy was past its zenith, it was at its height in popularity. A colorful start-up scene developed in the city, in which in 1706 a discovery of the century was made with the Berlin blue. That is why many legends and stories have grown up from the beginning. Let's reopen the case and finally close it, thanks to new research in the history of chemistry.

Target group: students, teachers and the school community - Duration: 45-60 minutes

The chemical secret of a Stradivarius

When a violin liquor enchants us with the sound of its Stradivarius, we believe we are very far away from chemistry. This is deceptive, because chemistry played and still plays an important role in Stradivari's workshop as well as with the drawn strings, the bow and the care of the instrument. So let's listen to the sound of a Stradivarius with the chemical ear.

Target group: students, teachers and the school community - Duration: 45-60 minutes

Absinthe - The kiss of the green fairy

Absinthe is trendy! After many decades of total prohibition, this drink has been allowed to be sold again in Germany for a few years. It was the favorite drink of the Parisian bohemians of the late 19th century. After a few glasses of absinthe, many gifted painters, musicians or poets hoped for the green fairy's embrace and kiss, which unleashed unexpected bursts of creativity. What is behind it and can we still hope for the green fairy today? So let's get to the bottom of it (chemical). À votre santé!

Target group: students, teachers and the school community - Duration: 45-60 minutes

From the Isenheim Altarpiece to the Beatles

On the Isenheim Altar, Mathias Grünewald disturbs us with the imaginative depiction of the "Temptation of St. Anthony" with a host of very terrible demons who harass and harass the desperate saint from all sides. We are particularly touched by a cripple covered with boils and suffering unspeakable pain, consequences of the popular epidemic ?Antoniusfeuer?. It took centuries for this epidemic disease to be recognized as a poisoning of the ergot fungus growing on rye. Let us shed some light on the fateful influence the poisons of ergot have played in human history.

Target group: students, teachers and the school community - Duration: 45-60 minutes

Chocolate - a chemical rush for the senses

Chocolate is a feast for all the senses: the silky matt dark brown, the wonderful cracking when a small piece is broken off, the scent that brings back memories of childhood and finally the gentle melting on the tongue. The secret of good chocolate is based on the ingredients of the cocoa bean, which are chemically refined during fermentation and roasting. Heavenly pleasures can only be achieved with a strong dose of chemistry.

Target group: students, teachers and the school community - Duration: 45-60 minutes

From the first beer to the hangover

The condition of the sick is worrying: nausea, vomiting, trembling limbs, outbreaks of sweat, pale corpse, sore skull and poor circulation. Instead of sympathy, the loved ones' eyes only gleam with glee: "Was the 12th beer bad?", "Serves you right, you couldn't get your throat full enough". How can a molecule as small as ethanol cause so much human suffering? Let's explore the chemical consequences of a wet and happy evening.

Target group: students, teachers and the school community - Duration: 45-60 minutes

Can chemistry be kosher?

Chemical industry products improve people's quality of life all over the world. Consumers expect the starting products, manufacturing processes and end products to meet the highest standards. But people of some denominations expect even more: adherence to religious regulations throughout the manufacturing process. Let us study this unusual border area between chemistry and religion using the example of Islamic and Jewish laws.

Target group: students, teachers and the school community - Duration: 45-60 minutes

H 2 O - tapped and originally corked

Water is extraordinary and amazes with so many peculiarities that it is no wonder that natural scientists have long had their teeth on the small molecule. In addition to the considerable successes in researching the properties of H2O in all aggregate states, water opens up a huge playground for scientific nonconformists, naive amateur researchers and savvy businessmen. Let us shed light on the colorful and sometimes shrill world of water on this side and beyond the limits of exact natural sciences with benevolence, critical distance and a large portion of gallows humor.

Target group: students, teachers and the school community - Duration: 45-60 minutes

Tattoo - chemistry that gets under your skin

"There is no nation, from the polar regions in the north to New Zealand in the south, in which the inhabitants do not have tattoos," said Charles Darwin in his "Origin of Species". The current renaissance of the tattoo thus only takes up a tradition that has been cultivated in many cultures over many centuries. As early as 2009, every fourth German between the ages of 25 and 34 was tattooed and over 100 million people in Europe. But what happens to our skin during and after the introduction of color pigments into the deeper skin layers? Let's follow a tattoo from a chemical point of view from the beginning.

Target group: students, teachers and the school community - Duration: 45-60 minutes

The chemical secret of the Christmas scent

Every year on the 1st of Advent, many local kitchens are transformed into small bakeries, in which cookies and other baked goods are made together. Then the scent of freshly baked Christmas cookies, cinnamon stars, stollen and gingerbread wafts through the living room. No other festival is so closely related to smells as Christmas and this sensory impression remains in a blissful and longing memory for a lifetime. Let's record the scent trail and try to find out its chemical basis. The effort is rewarded, because with the new knowledge, the Christmas treats taste twice as good.

Target group: students, teachers and the school community - Duration: 45-60 minutes

About sailors, guinea pigs and citrus fruits

We humans are by no means perfect biochemically. On the contrary, we have to ingest many essential substances with our food because our body cannot produce them itself. If we lack these substances, we get sick. A lack of vitamin C hits us particularly hard, because then we get sick with scurvy. It is not even 100 years ago that the molecular cause of this terrible disease was cleared up and humanity was set free from it forever. A look back into the many trials and tribulations of the centuries-old struggle against scurvy and in gratitude for the brave captains, Nobel Prize-winning chemists and physiologists and of course especially for the guinea pigs.

Target group: students, teachers and the school community - Duration: 45-60 minutes

The chemistry of espresso

Espresso is harmless to health, stimulates the spirit, does not make you fat and even has the papal blessing. Can you ask for more? A cup of espresso is easy to prepare: 50 roasted and ground coffee beans are pressure extracted in an espresso machine. Because of easy! There's a lot of chemistry behind it! So let's look at espresso from a chemical point of view and sip the tempting crema with twice the pleasure in the future.

Target group: students, teachers and the school community - Duration: 45-60 minutes

Chili - some like it spicy (with samples)

With plant species of the genus Capsicum, people all over the world spice up dishes visually and in terms of taste. Hungarian, Mexican, Korean and Indian cuisine would be inconceivable without their characteristic sharpness. How does Capsicum manage to synthesize chemical compounds that irritate our tongue just enough that we perceive it as a pleasant spiciness? Let's uncover the scientific background of the slowly decreasing burning tongue and enjoy spicy dishes even more consciously in the future.

Target group: students, teachers and the school community - Duration: 45-60 minutes

18109 Rostock: Dr. Gisela Boeck

Dr. Gisela Boeck

Warener Strasse 88
D-18109 Rostock
gisela.boeck@uni-rostock.de
Internet: www.boeck.chemie.uni-rostock.de

Right and left - also a chemical problem

Right and left play a role in many areas, whether in politics, art, botany or even chemistry. The spatial structure of the molecules can decide whether two molecules that look identical at first glance, for example, produce a sweet or sour taste or different biochemical effects.

Target group: Science enthusiasts, students from grade 11, teachers and school community - Duration: 45-60 minutes

Dimitri I. Mendeleev - an all-rounder?

Dmitri I. Mendeleev is known to many as the discoverer of the periodic table. In the lecture, in addition to his contributions to the establishment of this system, work on solution theory, petroleum, metrology and education will be presented.

Target group: those interested in history, Young Chemists Forum, pupils from grade 9, teachers and school community - duration: 45-60 minutes

The Walden inversion and the person behind it

The name Paul Walden is primarily known in connection with the Walden inversion, which plays a role in second-order nucleophilic substitution reactions at stereogenic centers. The lecture reports on Walden's biography and discusses his scientific achievements, which are by no means limited to organic chemistry.

Target group: those interested in history, Young Chemists Forum, pupils from grade 11, teachers and school community - duration: 45-60 minutes

About the first women chemists

In Germany women have only been allowed to enroll at universities since the beginning of the 20th century. The lives of some of them who decided to study chemistry are presented.

Target group: those interested in history, Young Chemists Forum, pupils from grade 11, teachers and school community - duration: 45-60 minutes

Lothar Meyer and the periodic table

Lothar Meyer made important contributions to the periodic table. His considerations, which led him to the first periodic arrangement of elements as early as 1864, are followed up and his further thoughts on periodicity are discussed.

Target group: those interested in history, Young Chemists Forum, pupils from grade 11, teachers and school community - duration: 45-60 minutes

The fate of Jewish chemists during the Nazi era

National Socialist politics from 1933 to 1945 had a significant influence on the development of chemistry in Germany. Jewish chemists were fired and only partially managed to flee abroad. In addition to presenting some fates, the impact on chemical research is discussed.

Target group: those interested in history, Young Chemists Forum, pupils from grade 11, teachers and school community - duration: 45-60 minutes

Ferdinand Friedlieb Runge and a forerunner of chromatography - the Runge pictures

Runge, a chemist of the 19th century, dealt intensively with coal tar and isolated numerous compounds from it. He is also often regarded as the father of chromatography , as he had observed that rings of different colors formed when different salt solutions were dripped onto absorbent paper. Simple experiments can also be shown for younger students.

Target group: those interested in history, Young Chemists Forum, pupils from grade 11, teachers and school community; Can also be designed for primary school students by arrangement - duration: 45-60 minutes

The chemistry of Christmas baking

Many families are busy baking during the Christmas season. When making the delicacies, one usually forgets the fact that baking is a complex chemical process. It reports on which substances react with each other, which new tasty compounds are created, how individual baking ingredients differ chemically, why pleasant smells pass through the room after a successful baking experiment and why an experiment does not work every now and then.

Target group: Those interested in natural sciences, Young Chemists Forum, pupils from grade 11, teachers and school community - Duration: 45-60 minutes

35396 Giessen: Professor Dr. Roland Bitsch

Waldbrunnenweg 16
D-35396 Giessen
roland.bitsch@uni-jena.de

Principles of nutrition for the elderly

Target group: school community - duration: 45 minutes

Water as the elixir of life

People's need for water

Target group: students, teachers, school community - Duration: 45 minutes

Chemical and physiological properties of vegetable polyphenols

Target group: students, teachers, school community - Duration: 45 minutes

Salt - crystals of life

Video cassette (recording of the MDR)

Target group: students, teachers, school community - duration: 30 minutes

Meat - an expendable food?

Facts and opinions on meat consumption

Target group: high school students and teachers

Vitamin D

A well-known and re-evaluated vitamin

Chemical structure, biosynthesis and physiological effect of this vitamin, needs and prophylactic aspects in humans in the light of more recent findings.

Target group: High school students, students and chemistry / biology teachers - Duration: approx. 30 - 40 minutes

Chemistry and Physiology of Vitamins

Approx. 3-hour theoretical introduction to the structure, occurrence, need and coverage of critical vitamins

Target group: High school teachers of chemistry, biology and housekeeping - Duration: approx. 3 hours

Calcium, iron and iodine as critical minerals / trace elements in the population

Target group: High school teachers of chemistry, biology and housekeeping - duration: 1.5 hours each

Vitamins as essential nutrients

Chemical structure and physiological functions of important vitamins are explained. The focus is on the functions as well as the possibilities of adequate intake using examples of the critical vitamins A, D, folic acid and B12.

Target group: high school students, students and teachers - duration: 60 min

Iron and iodine as trace elements

Both trace elements play a key role in the metabolism. Their sufficient supply in this country must be viewed as critical. The health consequences of inadequate intake as well as ways of meeting needs are discussed.

Target group: high school students, students and teachers - duration: 60 min

42119 Wuppertal: Prof. Dr. Michael W. Exchange

University of Wuppertal
Gaussstrasse 20
42119 Wuppertal
Michael Exchange

Excited states for exciting chemistry

Curricular innovation research in chemistry didactics

Chemistry also plays a key role in the development of photoprocesses for other STEM subjects, because one of its characteristic features is the explanation of macroscopic phenomena with the help of models at the (sub) microscopic particle level. In this sense, electronically excited states of molecules and other particle assemblies are common to all photoprocesses with and without a chemical reaction. That chemistry, physics, biology, computer science and geography can be conveyed in a stimulating, efficient, sustainable and future-oriented manner with stimulated states will be discussed in the lecture and demonstrated with a few experiments *. Experiments and other digital teaching / learning materials are available online on the Chemistry with Light Internet platform.

Target group: students, teachers and school community - Duration: 45-60 min

On the way to artificial photosynthesis

Light on! Even in chemical education!

In the lecture , the path to artificial photosynthesis will be followed on the basis of model experiments * in which essential elementary processes and energy conversions in the natural material cycle photosynthesis-cell respiration are simulated. In the further course, the direct, light-driven production of hydrogen without the detour via photovoltaics and electrolysis will be demonstrated experimentally *. This introduces one of the future scenarios for sustainable ?green chemistry?, which is based on climate-neutral, photocatalytically generated solar hydrogen. See also films on the Internet platform ? Chemistry with Light ? at the University of Wuppertal.

Target group: students, teachers and school community - Duration: 45-60 min

Photons and molecules

Experimental lecture and workshop for schools and universities

In the lecture and workshop, with the help of didactically concise experiments, it will be revealed how photons and molecules connect, separate and transform. Coherent with the experimental observations, model-theoretical explanations are developed on the particle level, with which the observed phenomena can be explained and other phenomena can be predicted and checked. Instructions are given on how to incorporate the experiments and models into lessons at secondary levels I and II and materials (worksheets, educational films, videos, model animations) are provided. The chemicals, devices, print and electronic materials for this workshop are summarized in the ? Photo-Mol? case, which can be purchased as part of the ?Chemistry School Partnership? sponsored by the Fonds der Chemischen Industrie. Regardless of this, the "intelligent" foil and luminescence samples made in the workshop can be taken with you. See also films on the website of the University of Wuppertal on fluorescence and photochromism.

Target group: students, teachers and school community - Duration: 45-60 min

Light laboratory plant

Experimental lecture and workshop for schools and universities

In the lecture and workshop, model experiments on the "plant light laboratory" are in the foreground. It is about the interaction of chlorophylls and carotenoids in photosynthesis as well as the material and energetic basis in the natural cycle of photosynthesis and respiration. The didactic utilization and curricular integration of the experiments in secondary levels I and II is supported with the help of teaching concepts, worksheets, model animations and educational films. More information on the course of the workshop, the experiments and materials as well as a cooperation offer at schools can be found on the " Plant Light Laboratory " slides on the Internet. See also films on the website of the University of Wuppertal on photoredox reactions.

Target group: students, teachers and school community - Duration: 45-60 min

Photosynthesis - a case for two

Interaction of chlorophyll and ?-carotene in photosynthesis

Carotenoids are interesting substances from everyday life, especially their most important representative, ?-carotene. Thanks to its interesting properties, ?-carotene is a chemical, biological and didactic all-rounder that always "puts a colorful swab on" chemistry and biology classes from the beginning to the Abitur and when developing or using technical terms, concepts and models of chemistry and biology can serve. In the lecture experiments and adequate integration possibilities for a modern curriculum will be presented. Videos and films about the experiments are available online at the University of Wuppertal under Photosynthesis - a case for two, part 2.

Target group: students, teachers and school community - Duration: 45-60 min

Photo & Nano - a strong couple

Thin layers with key functions

Photoactive nanomachines in biological functional units initiate the visual process in our eyes and photosynthesis in the green leaves. But why are they "photo and nano"? Because their drive, the light, cannot penetrate deep into the materials, but is already absorbed on the surface and nanostructured materials are ideally suited for this.

Evolution has produced ingenious biomaterials of this type. As a rule, light-absorbing species are combined with protein macromolecules. Inspired by nature, the materials science researches analog materials for technical applications. And here, too, light-absorbing molecules are combined with networks of organic polymers or inorganic ion lattices to form so-called nanocomposites. This innovative type of material is crucial for photovoltaics and photocatalysis, for example.

In the lecture , the underlying concepts of these two research areas will be developed under the motto photo & nano. Experimental approaches are shown and conceptually connected to curriculum-compliant content in order to apply, deepen and expand them. Slides of the presentation and other materials are available on the Internet under Chemistry with Light.

Target group: students, teachers and school community - Duration: 45-60 min

Luminescence - a paradigm shift for color

"The colors are deeds of light"

With the quote from his "Theory of Colors" quoted in the subtitle, Goethe was absolutely correct. However, his view of the composition of white light was wrong. In the lecture the question "What is light?" embedded in a cultural and scientific-historical excursion from Egyptian antiquity to Einstein's photoelectric effect and the light quanta. Both the historical milestones and our everyday experiences today with the "normal" colors of fabrics in white light and the luminescent or luminous colors, for example textiles in disco light or screens of electronic devices, confirm that "colors are deeds of light".

Luminescence in its various forms, eg fluorescence, phosphorescence, electroluminescence, chemiluminescence and bioluminescence will be highlighted in the lecture and illustrated with suitable experiments. Their conceptual explanation represents the paradigm shift claimed in the title, because unlike the ?normal? colors, luminous colors are not created through light absorption, but through light emission. This is a paradigm shift that has to be carried out in many school books and curricula that are still valid today. Digital materials on the cover topic are available on the Internet under Chemistry with Light.

Target group: students, teachers and school community - Duration: 45-60 min

47798 Krefeld: Professor Dr. Jürgen Schram

Niederrhein University of Applied Sciences
Department of Chemistry
Frankenring 20th
D-47798 Krefeld
schram@hsnr.de

Humans and chemistry - society, cultural history of a love-hate relationship

As an overview presentation or as individual lectures on the following sub-topics: From fire to the combustion process - From ceramics to porcelain - From copper to stainless steel - From shaman to pill-maker (medicine and chemistry).
Target audience: students, teachers and the school community

Book exhibition on chemistry books from 500 years

Accompanying lecture: "The book in chemistry - chemistry in a book."
History of the chemistry book from 1500 to 2000 - "From the chemical sample book to the chemical abstract"
(also suitable for non-chemists!)

Children's exhibition pipette

Possibly a lecture on a field report

48565 Steinfurt: Professor Dr. Horst Altenburg

Uhlandstrasse 17
D-48565 Steinfurt
hb-altenburg@versanet.de

Crystals and their cultivation

General properties of crystals and their cultivation, presentation of various (collected) crystals

Target group: Students, schoolchildren, teachers and the school community, on request also young people from 7 years - Duration: 45 minutes (on request also 60-90 minutes)

World of crystals

General properties of crystals and their cultivation, presentation of various (collected) crystals

Target group: Students, schoolchildren, teachers and the school community, on request also young people from 7 years - Duration: 45 minutes (on request also 60-90 minutes)

From table salt to ruby

General properties of crystals and their cultivation, presentation of various (collected) crystals. With demonstrations and / or experiments

Target group: Students, schoolchildren, teachers and the school community, upon request also young people from 7 years of age - Duration: 45 minutes (on request also 60-90 minutes)

Superconductivity

Basics and Applications

Target group: students, teachers and the school community - Duration: 45 minutes

physics and chemistry of water

(with experiments). Only near Steinfurt, as test equipment has to be transported with you.

Target group: students, teachers and the school community - Duration: 45 minutes

Preparation of ceramic superconducting substances

(possibly with demonstrations). Basics and Applications

Target group: students, teachers and the school community - Duration: 45 minutes

50354 Huerth Prof. Dr. Thomas Brock

Kallweg 2
D-50354 Huerth
Thomas Brock

Lacquers

From chemical raw material to car painting

The essential components of modern paint formulations - here with a focus on car paints - are presented, as is the manufacture of a paint from them. This also includes polymer and colloid chemistry as well as process engineering.
Some important test and measurement methods are also briefly described. The extremely complex process of car painting is then shown schematically and with videos. Finally, the current, especially more environmentally friendly, newer methods and trends in (car) painting technology are dealt with.

Target group: Students of MINT schools, especially advanced science courses. Teachers, especially science teachers and teachers in training. School community. - Duration: 45-60 min

Modern, environmentally friendly types of paint

Properties, differences, areas of application, manufacture, types of application

Based on the traditional solvent-rich paints, the newer, more environmentally friendly, often even solvent-free alternatives are described with their characteristics and areas of application, including video examples:
Low-solvent paints, water-based paints, powder paints and UV-crosslinking paints, which can usually also do without solvents. Each type of paint has its own characteristics, possibilities and limits. With the right selection and, if necessary, a combination of different processes, the increasingly strict emissions legislation can be complied with.

Target group: Pupils from MINT schools, especially advanced science courses. Teachers, especially science teachers and teachers in training. School community. - Duration: 45-60 min

New trends in paint technology

Water-based paints, powder paints, nanotechnology

Legislation and other market requirements always bring about new developments, trends and more modern methods of coating technology. But many systems also have their limits. These include: the use of fewer solvents, saving energy and other resources, but also nanotechnology with its sometimes surprising properties and possibilities The increasingly important area of functional coatings is also dealt with, with the examples of self-cleaning surfaces or the flame-retardant finishing of facades and facades Airports.

Target group: Pupils from MINT schools, especially advanced science courses. Teachers, especially science teachers and teachers in training. School community. - Duration: 45-60 min

Pigments

They add color to the paintwork; Effect pigments

Pigments are insoluble solids. The classic (and often containing heavy metals) mineral pigments have largely been replaced today by stronger and more permanent organic pigments. In addition, there are the platelet-shaped aluminum pigments (small mirrors), nano-thin coated interference mica pigments and liquid crystal pigments. Today, they all enable more and more fascinating color and effect impressions, beyond the already familiar metallic and pearlescent finishes.

Target group: Pupils from MINT schools, especially advanced science courses. Teachers, especially science teachers and teachers in training. School community. - Duration: 45-60 min

The beauty of surfaces

What is the ?beauty? of a surface? For documentation and global communication, it is required today to measure all contributions to it in numerical values, which seemed impossible a few years or even decades ago. Some examples are: color / hue, metallic and interference effects (rainbow), gloss, waviness and surface structure, matt effects (currently also a trend in vehicles) and haze (milky cloudiness).

The goal is always to avoid the extremely different and subjective perception of the human observer as a source of error. The article describes the most important methods and also always the correlation to our visual sensory impression.

Target group: Pupils from MINT schools, especially advanced science courses. Teachers, especially science teachers and teachers in training. School community. - Duration: 45-60 min

Sol-gel coatings

Polyreactions with silanes, silanols and siloxanes

The transition from soluble educts (brines) to polymer gels or solids is now widely used in coating technology: from eyeglass lenses to showcase glass and air conditioning systems to shower cubicles. A modular system with many monomers as modular elements and chemical functionalities enables numerous fascinating optical and technical surface properties.

Target group: Pupils from MINT schools, especially advanced science courses. Teachers, especially science teachers and teachers in training. School community. - Duration: 45-60 min

51467 Bergisch-Gladbach: Dr. Gerhard Heywang

Nittumer Weg 4
D-51467 Bergisch-Gladbach
Gerhard Heywang

Water - an everyday miracle ?!

The "elixir of life" water is an indispensable part of the earth: 70% of the earth's surface is covered with water, organisms such as jellyfish consist of up to 99% water and even humans carry 68% of their weight with this liquid. The wet "element" has many interesting properties. With experiments, which can usually be carried out easily at home, and video sequences, Dr. Gerhard Heywang, who used to work for Bayer AG in Leverkusen, shows various phenomena. Among other things, you get answers to the following questions: Can you "saw up" steel with a water jet? Can you glue panels with a drop of water that is not drop-shaped (!)? Why does a thermometer in ground ice show a temperature of around + 2 ° C? Why do the windows or mirrors fog up while showering? Why does a geyser splash periodically?
Duration: 90 minutes
Target group: high school classes and school community

Splish Splash

"Water" - lecture prepared for kindergarten children or primary school children. Which objects float in the water, which are drowned. Experiments on surface tension, an imploding beverage can, the superabsorbent from the baby diaper and the manufacture of the shower head will be demonstrated.
Duration: 45 minutes
Target audience: preschoolers and elementary school students

Plastics are just great!

Today there is hardly an area of our life imaginable in which plastics do not play an important or even a decisive role. The nature of plastics means that interesting physical properties can be realized. Various experiments on the special properties and synthesis of plastics will be presented in the lecture . The versatility of the application is demonstrated with many application examples. Here you can see that plastics are much more than "just plastic". For weight reasons, for example, the intake manifolds in the engine compartment of automobiles are made of polyamides. The tensile strength of plastic fibers exceeds that of steel. The field of functional polymers has recently become more and more important. Electrically conductive polymers, superabsorbents and electroviscous liquids are presented as examples.
Duration: 90 minutes
Target group: high school classes and school community

The chemistry between 6:30 am and 7:30 am

In the hour after waking up, people are exposed to an abundance of chemicals and chemical products - usually in a very pleasant way! The experimental lecture sheds light on the many facets where and how chemistry encounters us humans in the morning. In the first hour after getting up we encounter plastics, that is still possible, but also acetaldehyde, furfurylthiol and sotolone. One lets surfactants act on the body and one tries to get rid of them with the biosolvent water.
Duration: 60 minutes
Target group: high school classes and school community

What makes us vibrate?

How do our vocal cords work? Why do standing waves occur in a pipe that is open on both sides when you hit it with the flat of your hand? Why do sounds come out of a flute when blown in and not with a garden hose? Can you still make music with a garden hose? Does a piano really only deliver 88 tones? These and other questions about music and acoustics are entertainingly answered and explained using numerous simple experiments.
Duration: 70 minutes
Target group: high school classes and school community

Do you have notes?

The question "Do you have notes?" Is ambiguous:
1) Can you produce sounds? This is explained using vocal cords, pipes, horns and flutes and the underlying physical principles.
2) Do you have any words (there)? I don't hope for speechlessness, but the experiments in physics and chemistry (plastics and water) are definitely amazing.
Parts 1 and 2 are closely interwoven, although a certain entertainment value cannot be denied. Many of the experiments can easily be carried out at home. The experiments are all related to everyday life and are ideally suited for science lessons - with certain simplifications, for the most part even for primary schools.
Duration: 70 - 90 minutes - depending on the audience
Target group: high school classes and school community

Sparkling wine - also scientifically sparkling

Sekt embodies terms such as luxury, festivity and enjoyment. Sparkling wine is a foaming noble drop that simply belongs to festive occasions and special moments in life. This tradition came to Germany towards the end of the 18th century and with it the secret of the highly sensitive fermentation process. But how did sparkling wine actually come about, and what ingredients ultimately make it deliciously wet? Who thinks that the pressure in a champagne bottle is higher than that in a car tire? Experiments are presented on the ingredients water, carbon dioxide and ethanol.
Phenomena that can be observed in sparkling wine are also important in technology and nature. Among other things, the Lake Nyos disaster (1,800 dead and 30,000 animals killed) and cold geysers are treated in this way. The role of the silver spoon in supposedly ensuring the quality of the sparkling wine in an opened bottle in the refrigerator is also clarified.
Duration: 70 minutes
Target group: high school classes and school community

Heads of science

The natural scientists Daniel Bernoulli (fluid mechanics), Wallace Carothers (polyamide), Felix Hoffmann (aspirin), Otto Bayer (polyurethanes) and Hermann Schnell (polycarbonates) will be presented with impressive experiments.
Duration: 30 - 60 minutes
Target group: high school classes and school community

Egg, egg, egg - interesting and experimental information about the egg

Everyone has eaten an egg at some point - you have probably indulged yourself without thinking about the interesting questions and answers that are worth knowing behind eggs.
The experimental lecture deals with all aspects of the egg and answers questions such as: Why do you need a lot of water for a few eggs in an egg boiler and little water for a large number of eggs? Why are eggs quenched? How around does the egg come out of the chicken? Which chickens lay white eggs and which brown eggs? What is the color of brown eggs made of? How do you know if an egg is boiled or raw? How long does it take a chicken to make 8g of protein for the egg? How long does it take for the shell to form? Are Chickens Stupid or Smart? And much more besides.
Duration: Depending on your interests: 40, 60 or 80 minutes
Target group: students of all ages and school communities

A little light burns - experiments with candles

Burning candles spread mood and solemnity. The lecture deals with the questions ?Why do candles burn at all?? ?What happens when they are burned?? ?How are candles made?? And shows teasing experiments with candles from the Spar Advent wreath to the one-dimensional Christmas tree and the candle swing.
Duration: Depending on your interests: 40, 60 or 70 minutes
Target group: students of all ages and school communities

Electrically Conductive Polymers - History and Current Applications

Using the example of polyacetylene, the structural and chemical requirements for electrically conductive polymers are derived. With polyacetylene, conductivities that correspond to those of iron were achieved, but the processing options are quite modest and the long-term and thermal stability are completely inadequate. Soon after the discovery of polyacetylene, a significantly more stable material, polypyrrole, was presented, which also made technical applications possible. With polyethylene dioxythiophene, the processability and stability could be further developed to a large extent, so that a breakthrough for technical applications has been achieved. There are now a number of different possible uses: antistatic coatings in photo films, through-hole plating of printed circuit boards, counter electrodes in solid electrolytic capacitors, monitor coatings and organic light-emitting diodes (OLEDs). The applications are presented and the advantages of using electrically conductive polymers compared to conventional systems and problem solutions are presented. The breakthrough of polyethylene dioxythiophene in technical products was not least possible because the material can be applied as a dispersion and because the polymer can be specifically produced where its functional properties are required.
Duration: 60 minutes
Target group: high school students and teachers

From petroleum to polycarbonates

The lecture describes the path from petroleum to the plastic bis-phenol-A-polycarbonate. Crude oil is a mixture of products that is fractionated into various organic products - primarily hydrocarbons. The fractions that are not taken from the market are converted into aromatics, ethylene, propylene and others through further chemical conversion. The chemistry of the two technically carried out syntheses of polycarbonates from coke, sodium chloride as well as benzene and propylene is presented in detail. The processes for processing polycarbonate into foils, sheets and injection molded parts and the use of the products, including CDs and DVDs, are discussed and why other plastics cannot be used for this.
Duration: 60 minutes
Target group: teachers and students of advanced courses

How bewitched

In this experimental lecture the world seems to be no longer in order: Is that possible to inflate a balloon in a bottle? What is the bottle devil doing and why? Corks fall onto a table top and stay upright. Metal discs don't want to fall into a shot glass. An unprepared table tennis ball refuses to swim on water; to do this, he can be balanced on a straw. You have to see that an erecting lens behaves differently with red and blue letters, otherwise you won't believe it. You can hammer a thick nail into wood with a Bolognese bottle, but on the other hand it is very sensitive and shatters into a thousand pieces.
All experiments follow scientific laws, which are explained in an understandable way and are surprising and entertaining. All have to do with air or components of air. Many of the experiments can also be carried out at home with simple means.
Duration: 45 - 60 minutes
Target group: Kindergarten children from 5 years, pupils of all ages and school community

Rumpelstiltskin

The fairy tale Rumpelstiltskin is read out and garnished with physical and chemical experiments.
There is an abundance of physical and chemical experiments for the well-known fairy tale, which are presented in the appropriate places. The main topic is spinning experiments. It also shows how you can actually spin a golden wire out of real straw. The miller is an occasion to deal with the fire behavior of flour. A chemical solution to the problem is suggested for the girl's tears. The tearing of the Rumpelstiltskin is not demonstrated, but how it disappears into the "earth".
Duration: 60 min
Target group: students of all ages and school communities

Max and Moritz

The well-known rascal story is read out and garnished with physical and chemical experiments.
There is an abundance of physical and chemical experiments on Max and Moritz, which are presented at the appropriate places. The experimental lecture also explains why, for example, the fourth trick (teacher Lämpel) could not have taken place in this way. The leftovers from Max and Moritz didn't quite make it to the chickens after they were crushed. They will be destroyed in the lecture
Duration: 60 min
Target group: students of all ages and school communities

The tongue - a jack of all trades

New: Now also as an online lecture

The tongue is a very versatile organ. It helps with speaking, swallowing, chewing, and many other oral activities. The tongue consists of 9 different muscles, each of which can only contract, but you can still stick the tongue out. How does it work? And how does it work when a chameleon can catapult its tongue out to its own body length? In the lecture , test persons will examine how taste develops and which flavors can be perceived with the tongue. Does salt always taste salty and is hot chilli healthy? Who can roll their tongue? And what happens when the R is rolling? So all in all, it's about the chemistry and physics in the mouth.
Duration: 60 min
Target group: Students from 10 years of age of all school types and school communities

Something is dripping - (almost everything through drops)

A raindrop is round - no: almost round! It looks like a bun from the side. There are also round drops if they are small enough. There are also drops that represent a hemisphere; e.g. on the window pane. The structure referred to in German as ?drop shape? exists in art and advertising, but only very rarely in practice. Examples are presented. When building sandcastles, water droplets with the most peculiar shapes play a very important role and that is why sandcastles stay there for a considerable amount of time after they are built. Exceptionally unusual drops will be demonstrated: water with corn starch forms a ?mush? that enables particularly idiosyncratic drops. There are still drops of coffee, drops of wine, drops of honey and very special "nervous" drops that a theologian understood and described for the first time.
Duration: 60 min
Target group: Students from 10 years of age of all school types and school communities

52056 Aachen: Professor Dr. Rainer Waser

RWTH Aachen
Institute for Materials in Electrical Engineering II
D-52056 Aachen
waser@IWE.RWTH-Aachen.de

Perspectives for chemistry on the way to nano-electronics

Target audience: students, teachers and the school community

53117 Bonn: Professor Dr. Georg Schwedt

Lärchenstrasse 21
D-53117 Bonn
georg.schwedt@t-online.de

Sugar-sweet chemistry - experiments from glucose to starch

Experimental lecture
Target audience: students, teachers and the school community

Highlights from everyday chemistry - experiments with supermarket products

Experimental lecture
Target audience: students, teachers and the school community

Healthy ingredients in fruits and vegetables - made visible in experiments

Experimental lecture
Target audience: students, teachers and the school community

53127 Bonn: Prof. Dr. Hans Büning peacocks

On the Uhlberg 15
53127 Bonn
Hans Büning peacocks

Fragrances, aromas, smells

Cosmetic products and food often gain their originality and their individual profile with their special fragrance and aroma notes, which are composed again and again like works of art by highly paid perfumers and flavourists. Which basics are required, which historical references are appealing, which chemistry and which mechanisms are the basis, which material diversity and which overlaps apply to the two large product groups, are illustrated in an overview as an example for each level of knowledge.

Target group: Schoolchildren, especially those from advanced MINT courses, science teachers, school communities, interested scientists, especially chemists
Duration: 45 minutes

Desire for chemistry in food,
five exemplary successes for quality and safety

It will be presented how after drug treatment in aquacultures, which are particularly at risk of infection due to their high fish density, nonetheless residue-free goods can be obtained. Experimental test results give nickel-sensitive allergy sufferers security today compared to conventional stainless steel cooking pots, the alloy of which contains 8% nickel, among other things.

It will be presented how fractionated milk fats can be used in ice cream glazes without impairing their melting and crystallization behavior - and how these defined milk-fat fractions can be produced cost-effectively using supercritical carbon dioxide. It also becomes clear which advantages and which analytical safety the near-infrared spectrometry offers, for example in the ongoing production control of food, and which can also replace expensive wet-chemical analyzes. Finally, it is about the health-relevant glucosinolates and their biomarkers in broccoli and other crucifera (cruciferous vegetables).

Target group: Schoolchildren, especially those from advanced MINT courses, science teachers, school communities, interested scientists, especially chemists
Duration: 45 minutes

55122 Mainz: Dr. Hubert Bader

Lina-Bucksath-Strasse 20
D-55122 Mainz
Hubert Bader

Fracking - cheap energy with bad consequences?

Target group: science teachers, especially at MINT schools, pupils, especially from advanced science courses, chemistry teacher training centers, GDCh local sections, JCF regional sections
Duration: 45-60 minutes

55291 Saulheim: Professor Dr. Sigrid Saaler-Reinhardt

Prof.-Neeb-Strasse 4
D-55291 Saulheim
sigrid@saaler.de

Cell Chemistry - Live or Die

Target audience: students, teachers and the school community
Duration: approx. 60 minutes

Chemistry of the Cell - Cross-Border Molecular Transport

Target audience: students, teachers and the school community
Duration: approx. 60 minutes

63454 Hanau: Prof. Dr. Axel Kleemann

Amselstrasse 17
D-63454 Hanau
Axel Kleemann

Use of biotechnology for the production of active pharmaceutical ingredients

Biotechnological methods and process steps (enzymes, microorganisms, cell cultures) are being used to an increasing extent to produce enantiomerically pure active ingredients. These processes are an important part of "green chemistry," and even some basic organic chemicals can be produced economically using biotechnology.
Duration: 45 minutes
Target group: teachers, high school students; Chemists, biologists, pharmacists

Quo Vadis Pharmaceutical Research?

The development of new drugs and galenic formulations is becoming more and more time-consuming, expensive, risky, and thus an uncertain financial adventure. How is the pharmaceutical industry adapting to this?
Duration: 45 minutes
Target group: (young) chemists, pharmacists, physicians, biologists, teachers, high school students

The changing pharmaceutical industry

The pharmaceutical industry is currently under great pressure due to the expiry of many blockbuster drugs and the resulting competition from generic drugs, declining productivity in research and development, cost-cutting measures in many countries, increasing approval requirements and a poor public image. What will and must change?
Duration: 45 minutes
Target group: natural scientists, medical professionals, students, teachers and high school students

What makes pharmaceutical drug research so attractive?

The demand for new and better drugs will (have to) continue to increase due to demographic developments. The major challenges at present are dementia / Alzheimer's disease, resistant bacterial pathogens, certain cancers, rare diseases ("orphan diseases") and chronic diseases, which so far only respond to medication in some patients and can only be influenced symptomatically. There is no other field of work that is as multidisciplinary and interdisciplinary as modern drug research and development.
Duration: 45 minutes
Target group: natural scientists, medical professionals, students, teachers and high school students

63768 Hösbach: Dr. Roland Full, Dr. Werner Ruf

Dr. Roland Full
Hanns-Seidel-Gymnasium Hösbach
Mozartstrasse 35
D-63768 Hösbach
Roland Ful l

Dr. Werner Ruf
Celtis-Gymnasium Schweinfurt
Sonnenstrasse 52 b
D-97456 Dittelbrunn
Werner Ruf

Fascination chemistry: "Vivaldi goes Chemistry - The Four Seasons"

What Vivaldi succeeds in ingeniously with sounds is demonstrated by retired chemistry teachers Dr. Roland Full and Dr. Werner Ruf in her extraordinary experimental lecture with atoms and molecules. By adding substances with pinpoint accuracy, they start physical and chemical processes and thus develop pictures that paint themselves. The dance of the molecules appears in the large projection as a fascinating play of colors and shapes. This is chemistry at its most beautiful, which is also accessible to non-chemists, without words, more for the heart than for the brain. There is also music that increases the visual enjoyment of the pictures.

Target group: school community - duration: 60 minutes

64287 Darmstadt: Professor Dr. Matthias Rehahn

Darmstadt University of Technology
macromolecular chemistry
Alarich-Weiss-Strasse 4
D-64287 Darmstadt
m.rehahn@mc.tu-darmstadt.de

Functional plastics - secret helpers in daily life

Target group: students, teachers and the school community

64673 Mühltal: Prof. Dr. Thomas Schreckenbach

Prinzenbergweg 1
D-64367 Mühltal
tom.paul@t-online.de

Science and art: companions and sisters in spirit

Target group: School community, especially for students of advanced science courses and students of advanced art courses
Duration: 45 - 60 minutes

65779 Kelkheim: Dipl.- Ing.Peter Stevens, St.DiR

Berliner Ring 6
D-65779 Kelkheim am Taunus
pe70ge@t-online.de

Development of chemical processes

From the laboratory to production readiness

Planning, construction and operation of laboratory facilities for a "scale up" of chemical reactions using the example of the production of sulfuric acid, iron and food

Target group: chemistry teachers at general and vocational schools

Scientific professions

Characteristics of scientific professions in the chemical industry

Target group: teachers in general schools, especially 9th and 12th grade

Experiments in kindergarten

Biological, chemical and physical experiments for preschool children

Target group: educators

Subject chemical production

Didactic and methodical integration of the presentation of large-scale chemical processes in the classroom

Target group: chemistry teachers at general and vocational schools

65719 Hofheim am Taunus: Professor Dr. Eberhard Ehlers

Lorsbacher Strasse 54B
65719 Hofheim am Taunus
Eberhard Ehlers

Contributions of biotechnology to the therapy of the widespread disease diabetes mellitus

Diabetes is a widespread disease. Around 10% of the world's population suffer from this disease. The causes, the long-term consequences and the therapeutic options for the disease are presented. Using the example of the production of human insulin and insulin analogs, it is shown what contribution biotechnology, in particular genetic engineering, can make to the treatment of diabetes. The basics of protein synthesis are explained in a generally understandable way.

Target group: Schoolchildren and teachers of advanced natural science courses and upper secondary school levels as well as the school community, advanced training centers for chemistry teachers, forums for young chemists, adult education centers - Duration: 75 to 90 min

Nature as a model - isolation of new medicinal substances from natural sources

The cell as a chemical factory

Using the example of the isolation of antibiotics, phytonutrients and vitamins, it is shown what contribution nature makes in the discovery of new medicinal substances and how these active substances can be changed in a targeted manner through semisynthesis. The difference between prokaryotic and eukaryotic cells is explained and the advantages of using a cell for drug production are discussed. Natural substances such as morphine, cocaine, atropine, artemisinin, penicillins, insulins and their importance for the treatment of diseases are presented.

Target group: Schoolchildren and teachers of advanced natural science courses and upper secondary school as well as the school community, advanced training centers for chemistry teachers, forums for young chemists, adult education centers - Duration: 75 to 90 min

Isolation and purification of active pharmaceutical ingredients from culture broths

Many medicinal substances (antibiotics, monoclonal antibodies, substances of the blood coagulation cascade, etc.) are obtained today by fermentation. It will be shown which methods and processes are used in ?downstream processing? to isolate active pharmaceutical ingredients from fermentation broths and to present them in pure form. The basic principles of extraction, chromatography, cell disruption and solid-liquid separation as well as freeze-drying and spray-drying are presented.

Target group: Schoolchildren and teachers of advanced science courses and high school as well as advanced training centers for chemistry teachers, forums for young chemists - Duration: 75 to 90 min

Chromatography - a key technology for the production of biopharmaceuticals

Chromatography plays an important role in the isolation and purification of active pharmaceutical ingredients with the aid of biotechnology or genetic engineering. The basics of chromatographic processes are presented. The scale up as well as the scale down of such procedures is discussed.

Target group: Schoolchildren and teachers of advanced natural science courses and high school as well as advanced training centers for chemistry teachers, young chemists forums - Duration: 75 to 90 min

The importance of biotechnology for the industrial production of new substances

The basics and applications of white, red and green biotechnology for the industrial production of substances are presented. In particular, selected enzymatic-chemical reactions for the production of active pharmaceutical ingredients will be presented.

Target group: Schoolchildren and teachers of advanced natural science courses and high school as well as advanced training centers for chemistry teachers, young chemists forums - Duration: 75 to 90 min

Alternative forms of therapy

Fashion? Bestseller? Charlatanism? Placebo effect? What's behind it?

The use of homeopathy, anthroposophic medicine, Bach flower therapy and Schüßler salts for the treatment of diseases are presented. Placebo and no-placebo effects are explained. Mistletoe therapy for cancer is discussed in more detail. Animal-assisted forms of therapy are also reported. Pavlov's attempts at conditioning are discussed in detail.

Target group: Schoolchildren and teachers of advanced natural science courses and upper secondary school as well as the school community, advanced training centers for chemistry teachers, forums for young chemists, adult education centers - Duration: 75 to 90 min

Molecules That Move the World (Part 1)

Subtitle: Small Molecules, Big Impact

The influence of small chemical molecules [carbon dioxide, uranium dioxide, nitrogen monoxide, nitrous oxide, oxygen, ozone, water, ethanol, methanal (formaldehyde)] on everyday human life is the subject of this lecture.

Target group: Schoolchildren and teachers of advanced natural science courses and upper secondary school as well as the school community, advanced training centers for chemistry teachers, forums for young chemists, adult education centers - Duration: 75 to 90 min

Molecules That Move the World (Part 2)

Molecules as the building blocks of life

Sugar, protein, nucleic acid and fat molecules and their physiological and therapeutic significance are presented.

Target group: Schoolchildren and teachers of advanced natural science courses and upper secondary school as well as the school community, advanced training centers for chemistry teachers, forums for young chemists, adult education centers - Duration: 75 to 90 min

Molecules That Move the World (Part 3)

Active ingredient molecules that made history

Molecules such as morphine, cocaine, caffeine, ethanol and others are presented and how they have influenced the music scene in particular. In addition, natural and synthetic drugs as well as practicable ways of combating drugs are discussed. Addiction and the fight against addiction are discussed.

Target group: Schoolchildren and teachers of advanced natural science courses and upper secondary school as well as the school community, advanced training centers for chemistry teachers, forums for young chemists, adult education centers - Duration: 75 to 90 min

Molecules That Move the World (Part 4)

Subtitle: From Molecular Formula to Genetic Code

The lecture shows how information can be passed on using a chemical formula and its spatial structure. It also discusses how the genetic code comes about and what role the amino acid sequence plays in the properties of proteins and enzymes.

Target group: Schoolchildren and teachers of advanced natural science courses and upper secondary school levels as well as the school community, advanced training centers for chemistry teachers, forums for young chemists, adult education centers - Duration: 75 to 90 min

Serendipity, or the role of chance in discovery

How does the new get into the world?

The term ?serendipity? is explained and examples are given of how chance and not targeted search played a key role in many discoveries (sticky notes, dynamite, Velcro, the effects of pharmaceuticals, vulcanization, credit cards, etc.).

Target group: Schoolchildren and teachers of advanced natural science courses and upper secondary school as well as the school community, advanced training centers for chemistry teachers, forums for young chemists, adult education centers - Duration: 75 to 90 min

150 years of the periodic table of the elements

The history and evolution of the Periodic Table of the Elements (PSE) are covered; newer elements and their discovery are presented. Selected examples illustrate how the position of an element in the periodic table allows conclusions to be drawn about its physical and, above all, its chemical properties. The key role of the electron configuration of an element (structure of the atomic shell) on its properties is discussed. The skewed relationships in the PSE are discussed. The typical properties of metals, semi-metals and non-metals are presented.

Target group: Schoolchildren and teachers of advanced natural science courses and upper secondary school levels as well as the school community, advanced training centers for chemistry teachers, forums for young chemists, adult education centers - Duration: 75 to 90 min

Women and science

Does the Nobel Prize need a quota for women?

The résumés of selected female scientists (Curie, Meitner, Immerwahr, Kwolek, etc.) are presented and it is discussed what important contribution many female scientists have made in their field, but which did not always find the right recognition and appreciation in the professional world. But women who have been awarded the Nobel Prize are also honored in this presentation. In addition, natural scientists will be presented who have made Career in art and politics outside their field (Adorno, Hamm-Brücher, Merkel, Schwätzer, Thatcher, etc.).

Target group: Schoolchildren and teachers of advanced natural science courses and upper secondary school levels as well as the school community, advanced training centers for chemistry teachers, forums for young chemists, adult education centers - Duration: 75 to 90 min

Unlucky in science and economy [NEW]

The biographies of scientists in physics, chemistry, life sciences and medicine who were creative and made groundbreaking inventions, but whose achievements have not always been appropriately recognized, are presented. Such ?unlucky fellows? also include highly respected researchers who were ignored, for example, when the Nobel Prize was awarded. Such people were often misunderstood in their time, even ostracized, and only much later were their ideas realized for the benefit of society. The differences between inventing, developing, creating and discovering are discussed in more detail.

Target group: Schoolchildren and teachers of advanced natural science courses and upper secondary school as well as the school community, advanced training centers for chemistry teachers, forums for young chemists, adult education centers - Duration: 75 to 90 min

The pain and its treatment [NEW]

The causes of painful conditions and their treatment options are explained. Phenomena such as ?paradoxical pain? (analgesic pain) and ?phantom pain? are discussed. The dependence on pain medication is discussed. General aspects of addiction are presented. The physiological processes of pain conduction are discussed.

Target group: Schoolchildren and teachers of advanced natural science courses and upper secondary school as well as the school community, advanced training centers for chemistry teachers, forums for young chemists, adult education centers - Duration: 75 to 90 min

The discovery of nitroglycerine and what became of it [NEW]

It will be presented how the discovery of nitroglycerine by Ascania Sobrero happened by chance and how the development of dynamite by Alfred Nobel went. The importance of dynamite in the construction of roads, tunnels and rail lines in the past century is explained using examples (Gotthard tunnel). It also describes how the money from the Nobel Foundation is used today as prize money for the highest scientific award - the Nobel Prize. It also deals with the use of nitroglycerin and its derivatives in medicine for the treatment of angina pectoris.

Target group: Schoolchildren and teachers of advanced natural science courses and upper secondary school levels as well as the school community, advanced training centers for chemistry teachers, forums for young chemists, adult education centers - Duration: 45 to 60 min

65779 Kelkheim: Dr. Klaus-Dieter Franz

Gimbacher Weg 25
D-65779 Kelkheim am Taunus
Email: Senior Expert Chemists

Music for the eye

Color, chemistry and function of effect pigments

The development of chemical-pharmaceutical chemistry is closely linked to the development of dyes and is also an industrial innovation driver. The global competition for our chemical site is a constant challenge for new products and problem solutions. Effect pigments are an example of the successful implementation of a new concept for color and function. In addition to classic absorption and metallic pigments, these combine shimmering, bright colors with attractive gloss effects. They are based on the natural model of mother-of-pearl, mineral or structure colors. As multi-layer pigments, they are accessible on a large scale through an intelligent combination of simple, technical and chemical processes and are increasingly being used as functional materials.

Target group: students, teachers and the school community - Duration: 45-60 minutes

Curiosity and Scientific Progress

Target group: Science teachers, students of advanced science courses - Duration: 60 minutes

Function, invention, innovation

Key technology chemistry

Target group: students, teachers and the school community - Duration: 60 minutes

Chemistry for energy storage technologies

Target group: students, teachers and the school community - Duration: 45-60 minutes

65817 Prof. Dr. Gerhard Kreysa

Weingasse 22
65817 Eppstein
Gerhard Kreysa

Strategy, visions and illusions to save the climate

The history and development of the term ?sustainable? are presented and the causes of the disturbed carbon cycle are discussed. In addition, facts about the climate, the wrong path of biofuels, climate engineering, the rehabilitation of the atmosphere through geolocation of wood and the carbon moratorium are addressed and discussed.

Target group: Schoolchildren and teachers of advanced natural science courses and the upper level as well as the school community, advanced training centers for chemistry teachers, forums for young chemists, adult education centers - duration: 60 to 75 minutes

65926 Frankfurt: Dr. Peter Rittmeyer

Rockwood Lithium GmbH
Industrial park Hoechst
Building 879
D-65926 Frankfurt
peter.rittmeyer@rockwoodlithium.com

lithium
- Occurrence and extraction of raw materials
- Properties (what makes Li so special)
- Applications (priorities in consultation with the schools / teachers - e.g. Li in electromobility (batteries), in organic synthesis .....)

Target group: the lecture can be adapted to the target group; higher intermediate and advanced level

67157 Wachenheim: Prof. Dr. Michael Röper

Prof. Dr. Michael Röper

Pegauer Str. 10
D-67157 Wachenheim
Michael Röper

Value chains in industrial organic chemistry

Industrial organic chemistry is a complex, flexible network that has developed over a period of over 150 years and is still constantly being developed. A limited number of basic and intermediate products are produced from a few raw materials, each of which is the starting point for value chains leading to the large number of end products. Using propene as an example, the lecture shows how to get from petroleum to superabsorbents or emulsion paints.

Target group: Schoolchildren and teachers of advanced natural science courses and upper secondary school levels as well as the school community, advanced training centers for chemistry teachers, forums for young chemists, adult education centers - Duration: 45 to 60 min

Homogeneous catalysis in the chemical industry

Catalysts are substances that lower the activation energy of a reaction system so that the desired reaction can take place at high speed. Their high selectivities result in low levels of by-products - which is not only an economic advantage, but also protects our environment. Homogeneous catalysts are soluble metal complexes whose activity and selectivity can be tailored to the desired product. The lecture gives examples of industrially used, highly selective processes both for large-volume products (e.g. acetic acid) and for specialties such as optically active compounds for pharmaceuticals (e.g. the Parkinson's drug L-DOPA).

Target group: Schoolchildren and teachers of advanced natural science courses and upper secondary school levels as well as the school community, advanced training centers for chemistry teachers, forums for young chemists, adult education centers - Duration: 45 to 60 min

Change in the raw material base for the chemical industry

Chemical products are omnipresent in our everyday life. Examples are packaging, pharmaceuticals or cosmetics, pesticides, detergents, textiles and many more. The basis for this diversity is organic chemistry, the products of which are omnipresent in our everyday lives. But the inorganic materials also have a decisive influence on our lifestyle. Because they are the basis for high-tech products such as flat screens, solar cells, smartphones, computers and high-performance batteries. We need raw materials for all of these products, and they are finite. As the lecture shows, by improving our processes we can both use new raw materials and make better use of the raw materials we have used up to now, also through new material cycles.

Target group: Schoolchildren and teachers of advanced natural science courses and upper secondary school as well as the school community, advanced training centers for chemistry teachers, forums for young chemists, adult education centers - Duration: 45 to 60 min

Chemical use of carbon dioxide - what is possible and what makes sense

Carbon dioxide is the carbon carrier of our planet. Photosynthesis / sunlight resulted in all naturally occurring organic compounds including fossil fuels. Even if carbon dioxide is an extremely low-energy molecule, it can still enter into chemical reactions. However, this requires high-energy reactants such as hydrogen, ethylene oxide or ammonia. Established as well as new syntheses in development with carbon dioxide will be presented in the lecture . This includes very large-volume syntheses of fuels, for example (e-fuels). However, their demand for (sustainable!) Energy is enormous.

Target group: Schoolchildren and teachers of advanced natural science courses and upper secondary school as well as the school community, advanced training centers for chemistry teachers, forums for young chemists, adult education centers - Duration: 45 to 60 min

67434 Neustadt: Dr. Ekkehard Schwab

Dr. Ekkehard Schwab

Berwartsteinstrasse 4
D-67434 Neustadt ad Weinstrasse
Ekkehard Schwab

Energy, our elixir of life - where does it come from, where does it go?

Following the motto "Use numbers, not adjectives", the lecture places the political discussion about renewable energies and climate change in the context of the dimensions of our current energy system. Access to affordable energy sources has fueled the development of human societies in the past. Standard of living and per capita consumption of primary energy correlate significantly, but the values vary considerably.

The targets for reducing greenhouse gas emissions are most likely only realistic if the replacement of fossil primary energy by renewable (solar) sources is combined with a much more efficient use of energy. The latter is not just a technical but also a social and behavioral issue.

Duration: 45-60 minutes
Target group: Schoolchildren, especially MINT students and students of MINT advanced courses, science teachers, school communities, adult education centers, advanced training centers for chemistry teachers, SEC (for science forum, annual meeting, SEC lecturer)

Change in the use of raw materials for the chemical industry

The chemical industry in Germany currently has a share of around 5% in the world market. Its carbon-containing products are mainly made from the energy sources oil (72%) and gas (14%). After all, 13% of the products are based on renewable raw materials. With less than 2%, coal plays practically no role. In total, the German chemical industry uses around 20 million tons of organic raw materials and again the same amount of inorganic raw materials such as table salt.

The raw materials of the chemical industry have been and are constantly being adapted. At the beginning of the 19th century, wood was the raw material. Coal later changed the whole industry and growth accelerated. After 1945, oil became the world's dominant raw material. However, coal is currently gaining in importance in China and gas in particular in the USA.

The future of raw material supply will therefore be more diverse than in the past; there will no longer be a single dominant global raw material. Instead, there will be a much greater regional diversification of raw materials. This requires global companies such as BASF to significantly broaden their technology portfolio.

Duration: 45-60 minutes
Target group: Schoolchildren, especially MINT students and students of MINT advanced courses, science teachers, school communities, adult education centers, advanced training centers for chemistry teachers, SEC (for science forum, annual meeting, SEC lecturer)

Industrial catalysis - a decisive success factor for the chemical industry

Catalysts play a central role in processes in the chemical industry. Both the raw material and the energy requirements of processes depend crucially on the quality of the catalysts used.

The development of such products is an extremely varied and challenging task. In order to master them, one must master a large number of specialist disciplines. A technical catalyst is much more than an "active center" and is often the result of a balanced compromise between several actually contradicting objectives.

The lecture sheds light on these aspects and uses a concrete example to show what unconventional results such a development process can lead to.

Duration: 45-60 minutes
Target group: Schoolchildren, especially MINT students and students of MINT advanced courses, science teachers, school communities, adult education centers, advanced training centers for chemistry teachers, SEC (for science forum, annual meeting, SEC lecturer)

76351 Linkenheim-Hochstetten: Professor Dr. Klaus-Dieter Jany

Nelkenstrasse 36
D-76351 Linkenheim-Hochstetten
Klaus-Dieter Jany

Genetic engineering - what is it? How does it work?

All lectures by Jany:
Target group: Students of advanced science courses, science teachers, school communities, chemistry teacher training centers
Duration: 45-60 minutes

Genetic engineering in everyday life

so

Genetically Modified Food - Opportunities and Risks

so

Green genetic engineering - forming opinions in discourse

so

Ecotoxicology - conventional and genetically modified plants

so

From Mendel to modern plant breeding

so

Food of the future - novel foods

so

Food intolerances - allergies and pseudo-allergies

so

77704 Oberkirch: Prof. Dr. Klaus-Peter Jäckel

Hansjakobstr. 5
77704 Oberkirch
Klaus-Peter Jäckel

Work organization and time management

All lectures by Jäckel:
Target group: High school teachers, students of advanced science courses, school community
Duration: 60 minutes

The chemist as a manager

so

Project management

so

Tools for personnel management: the performance appraisal

so

91058 Erlangen: Professor Dr. Horst Kisch

Institute for inorganic chemistry
University of Erlangen-Nuremberg
Egerlandstrasse 1
D-91058 Erlangen
Horst Kisch

Solar catalysis - gentle chemistry with air and sun

 
Target audience: students, teachers and the school community

95448 Bayreuth: Dr. Dieter Kunz

Dr. Dieter Kunz

Nice view 11
95448 Bayreuth
Dieter Kunz

Carbon - real gold

No element allows as diverse reaction possibilities as carbon. Beyond organic chemistry with its main protagonist carbon, carbon can even be found in space as a diamond (unfortunately difficult to access) but also in the soil as a fossil fuel, coal. Technical progress in materials science is often linked to our property record master (eg electrical current flow density [109 A / cm²] ? 100 times higher than with copper). The example of carbon shows how scientific knowledge can inspire technology and economy: the basis of the chemical industry!

Carbon in the atmosphere also influences the temperature through CO 2 and soot particulate matter. The size of the effect is controversial. After the lecture everyone will know: Compared to gold, carbon is the more valuable material!

Target group: Pupils from MINT schools, especially from MINT advanced courses; Science teachers, school community, development associations, adult education centers, advanced training centers for chemistry teachers, SEC (annual meeting, science forum, SEC lecturer) - Duration: 45-60 minutes

Efficient, electric heating with carbon

Heating with carbon is nothing out of the ordinary. Every coal stove provides a vivid example. But you can also use the carbon for heating without burning it if you electrify it. This is how you imagine a carbon dispersion that you paint on the wallpaper with a lambskin roller like a wall paint, connect right and left with a copper tape and apply voltage. Why does it affect our body differently than the usual radiators? What other interesting things can be done with a ?paintable? heater?

lecture with a short demonstration

Target group: Pupils from MINT schools, especially from MINT advanced courses; Science teachers, school community, development associations, adult education centers, advanced training centers for chemistry teachers, SEC (annual meeting, science forum, SEC lecturer)
Duration: 45-60 minutes

Fiber composite materials - efficient materials based on nature's example

When nature needs stable structures, it does not create "bulwarks", but uses a combination of differently dense and solid materials with mostly fiber-like components. Wood is a typical example of this. But why is this combination of materials so important? Why does a pane of glass break when you bend it, but the glass fiber doesn't? Also interesting: why are airplanes mostly made of fiber composite structures and cars almost not at all?

lecture with exhibits

Target group: Pupils from MINT schools, especially from MINT advanced courses; Science teachers, school community, development associations, adult education centers, advanced training centers for chemistry teachers, SEC (annual meeting, science forum, SEC lecturer)
Duration: 45-60 minutes

When does an investment pay off? Dealing with Risk

The management theory insists that a company can only successfully move into the future with an investment calculation. Even the layperson recognizes from various press reports that new plants or company acquisitions failed to achieve the expected success despite the investment calculation. So it is interesting to find out what the calculation can do and where its limits are. Because there is always a risk that often fades behind full-bodied promises.

Target group: Pupils from MINT schools, especially from MINT advanced courses; Science teachers, school community, development associations, adult education centers, advanced training centers for chemistry teachers, SEC (annual meeting, science forum, SEC lecturer)
Duration: 45-60 minutes

How can you calculate the IR absorption of CO 2 with "on-board means"?

After reading Wikipedia about "greenhouse gas", you think you have understood how CO 2 works in the atmosphere. However, the statement that it contributes between 9% and 26% to the greenhouse effect makes us suspicious, although the global differences in concentration are very small in contrast to water vapor!

With the relatively simple photometric equation according to Lambert-Beer and spectroscopy data from the Internet (e.g. from HITRAN.org), after a calculation in Excel, one finds that the greenhouse effect of CO 2 is at least 26% - but the overall greenhouse effect is much, much smaller than generally stated. (Is this effect really comparable to the greenhouse?)

You don't have to be a ?climate expert? to understand the lecture . Knowledge of mathematics and physics from the upper school level is sufficient.

Target group: Pupils from MINT schools, especially from MINT advanced courses; Science teachers, school community, development associations, adult education centers, advanced training centers for chemistry teachers, SEC (annual meeting, science forum, SEC lecturer)
Duration: 45-60 minutes

Plastic waste: knowledge and speculation

The time to deal with materials without a head is slowly coming to an end. That is very positive in several ways. But is the damage caused by plastic waste and microplastic identified as a threat a legitimate justification for this? What is it about "plastic on your plate" and how do you find the huge plastic waste islands in the Pacific?

Target group: Pupils from MINT schools, especially from MINT advanced courses; Science teachers, school community, development associations, adult education centers, advanced training centers for chemistry teachers, SEC (annual meeting, science forum, SEC lecturer)
Duration: 45-60 minutes

Energy efficiency through material selection

The highest form of energy efficiency is usually not having to convert any energy. But when we convert energy, it is mostly for movement or for heat Management (heating, cooling). In the case of moving bodies, the "consumption" of energy depends on their mass, which is why lighter materials are to be preferred; is that really always true? Foam-like materials are the first choice for efficient heat utilization. But not only!

Target group: Pupils from MINT schools, especially from MINT advanced courses; Science teachers, school community, development associations, adult education centers, advanced training centers for chemistry teachers, SEC (annual meeting, science forum, SEC lecturer)
Duration: 45-60 minutes

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last modified: 28.06.2021 11:08 H from W.Gerhartz