environmental monitoring

Working Group Environmental Monitoring

Activities 2021/22

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, no face-to-face events of the working group (AK) environmental monitoring could be held in 2021. For this reason, two lecture events were held as virtual meetings over the course of the year, with speakers invited to each of the main topics. More

research projects

AK members are actively involved in the following environmental monitoring projects:

Thematic compilation of publications

The members of the environmental monitoring working group of the GDCh Division of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology at various institutions. In addition to representatives from federal and state authorities, colleagues from universities and research institutes are also represented. The expertise of the members of the AK covers various issues of environmental monitoring. AK members are also involved in the preparation of many specialist articles and reports   involved, which are published in different ways. Current topics are, for example, the analysis of brominated flame retardants in fish from inland waters, the determination of heavy metal inputs in forest areas or the examination of environmental samples for the percentage of microplastics. Some of the content is considered "open access"   freely available or reports are made available for download on the websites of the institutions concerned. Publications from the last few years, in which members of the AK were involved, have now been sorted by topic. The publication overviews are available below as PDF files and, for many publications, also contain links to the journals or the download pages of the respective editors.

Subject areas:

Activity reports/activities

Contact:

dr Heinz Rüdel, Fraunhofer
IME, Schmallenberg; phone 02972 302 301;
Email: h.ruedel@go.gdch.de

2021/2022

Due to the COVID-19 pandemic, no face-to-face events of the working group (AK) environmental monitoring could be held in 2021. For this reason, two lecture events were held as virtual meetings over the course of the year, with speakers invited to each of the main topics.

The topic of the event in June 2021 was vegetation monitoring, where speakers presented developments and results from moss monitoring and from the environmental sample bank program. The event with more than 30 participants dealt, for example, with the selection of measuring points, the sampling and processing of moss samples, the results of metal pollution from moss monitoring in Bavaria and the analysis of halogenated flame retardants in tree samples from the Federal Environmental Specimen Bank. In another contribution, the results of a retrospective monitoring of plant-associated arthropod communities using environmental DNA metabarcoding from archived leaf and needle samples from the environmental specimen bank were presented.

The main topic of the virtual AK meeting at the end of November 2021 with around 50 participants was the monitoring of active substances in plant protection products (PPP). Contributions dealt with investigations of small bodies of water for PPPs and feedback on PPP approval, results of airborne monitoring of PPPs and results of PPP investigations of deposit samples and indicator plants from Bavaria.

In September 2021, at the virtual Conference "Environment 2021", which was organized by the SETAC-GLB and the GDCh Division of Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology , a session on the topic " Working Group Environmental Monitoring and polyfluorinated alkyl substances (PFAS) - recording and evaluation organized. The focus was on approaches to analyzing the potential total exposure in environmental samples using the "total oxidizable precursors" assay (TOP assay) and other summary approaches such as recording the extractable organic fluorine compounds (EOF). With 70 participants, the session was well attended. A detailed report on the session was published in the Division 's communications (issue 4, 2021; pp. 122-124).

The first meeting of the Working Group Environmental Monitoring in 2022 could also only be organized as a virtual event. At the beginning of April 2022, more than 40 people took part in the AK meeting on the subject of environmental monitoring with suspended matter. The spectrum of contributions included the monitoring of plastic additives and their Literature with suspended matter samples from the environmental sample bank, the investigation of trends in perfluorinated and polyfluorinated alkyl substances (PFAS) using the target and TOP assay and using the sum parameter EOF in suspended matter. Further presentations dealt with the results and case studies of the retrospective non-target analysis of trace substances in suspended matter, studies on suspended matter samples on contamination with quaternary alkyl ammonium compounds and on the development of multi-resistance in environmental organisms in the COVID-19 pandemic, as well as retrospective biodiversity studies using environmental DNA from suspended matter from the environmental sample bank in the TrendDNA project.

Further information on the AK meetings held and on Working Group Environmental Monitoring in general is available via the e-mail contact given on this page (see box on the right).

Since the planned election could not be carried out at a face-to-face meeting due to corona, the previous management of the Working Group Environmental Monitoring Monitoring Working Group is still active as an executive. Until the election planned for the course of 2022, the AK will be headed jointly by Heinz Rüdel (Fraunhofer IME), Winfried Schröder (Uni Vechta) and Jan Schwarzbauer (RWTH Aachen University).

2020/ 2021

In 2020, three meetings of the environmental monitoring working group (AK) were organised. In January 2020, a meeting took place in Berlin, at which a room of the Federal Environment Agency could be used. The session with around 20 participants focused on the topic "Phosphonates in the aquatic environment". Experts from various institutions presented and discussed research results on the characterization and determination of technical phosphonic acids in waste water and sediment samples, on the biological degradation of aminophosphonates and on investigations of refractory phosphorus in the effluent of a sewage treatment plant.

Due to corona, the other events of the Working Group Environmental Monitoring in 2020 could only take place as video conferences. In July 2020, various participants presented the EU project Life Apex (https://lifeapex.eu), in which the systematic use of pollutant data from top predators and their prey in chemical management is to be promoted. Here, methods of non-target and suspect screening are to be used in order to characterize the exposure to chemicals in the organisms and, in particular, to use possible accumulations of substances in top predators as an early warning system. 25 participants discussed various aspects of this topic online. Another meeting of the Working Group Environmental Monitoring then took place at the end of November 2020. At this meeting with about 50 participants, environmental monitoring and risk assessment of per- and polyfluorinated alkyl compounds (PFAS) were the main topics. Speakers presented, for example, contributions on the status of PFAS assessment and regulation, on PFAS trend studies by the Federal Environmental Specimen Bank, on analysis methods for PFAS that also include precursor compounds (TOP assay), on background levels of PFAS in soils and on Evaluation of PFAS in food. In a final round, the results were lively discussed.

At least two meetings of the Working Group Environmental Monitoring are planned for 2021. The first meeting, which took place as a video conference at the beginning of June, dealt with vegetation monitoring. Speakers presented developments and results from moss monitoring and from the environmental specimen bank program. This involved, for example, the selection of measuring points and the taking of moss samples, the results of metal pollution from moss monitoring in Bavaria and the analysis of halogenated flame retardants in tree samples from the environmental sample bank.

The Working Group Environmental Monitoring is headed jointly by Heinz Rüdel (Fraunhofer IME), Winfried Schröder (Uni Vechta) and Jan Schwarzbauer (RWTH Aachen University). Due to corona, the regular election of the management of the Working Group Environmental Monitoring could not be carried out as planned during a face-to-face meeting in 2020. This is to be made up for at a meeting at the end of 2021. If no meeting is possible by the end of the year, the election would be carried out as a postal vote. Further information on the AK meetings held and on Working Group Environmental Monitoring in general is available via the e-mail contact given on this page (see box on the right).

2019/ 2020

In 2019, two meetings of the Working Group Environmental Monitoring took place. At the meeting in May 2019, the topic of "biota monitoring" was discussed. While one contribution dealt with fish monitoring for the monitoring of priority substances of the Water Framework Directive, another presentation dealt with the retrospective investigation of cyclic methylsiloxanes in fish from the environmental sample bank. The second meeting in October 2019 focused on the topic "environmental monitoring of mercury in terrestrial ecosystems". Here, for example, researchers presented studies on the development of a method for measuring wet mercury deposition under the canopy of forests and on the atmospheric input of mercury in alpine ecosystems. Minutes of the meetings are available for those interested.

The main topics of two meetings from previous years formed the basis of publications that appeared in 2019. The article ?Rating the risks of anticoagulant rodenticides in the aquatic environment: a review? (Environmental Chemistry Letters 2019, 17, 215-240; link.springer.com/article/10.1007%2Fs10311-018-0788-6 ) discusses, among other things, findings from the environmental monitoring of rodenticides. From the meeting in December 2018, at which scientists from the UBA, UFZ, TZW Karlsruhe, TU Munich and LfU Bayern presented the topic "Persistent, Mobile and Toxic Substances" from different perspectives, another contribution arose: Persistent, mobile and toxic substances in the environment: a spotlight on current research and regulatory activities (Environmental Sciences Europe 2020, 32:5; enveurope.springeropen.com/articles/10.1186/s12302-019-0286-x, open access).

In 2020, two meetings of the Working Group Environmental Monitoring are planned. The first meeting at the end of January will focus on the topic "Phosphonates in the aquatic environment". The AK management is available for further information on the Working Group Environmental Monitoring . The Working Group Environmental Monitoring is headed jointly by Heinz Rüdel (Fraunhofer IME), Winfried Schröder (Uni Vechta) and Jan Schwarzbauer (RWTH Aachen University).

2018/ 2019

The Working Group Environmental Monitoring is headed jointly by Heinz Rüdel (Fraunhofer IME), Jan Schwarzbauer (RWTH Aachen University) and Winfried Schröder (Uni Vechta). In 2018, the members of the AK met for a meeting at which colleagues from UBA, Ufz, TZW Karlsruhe, TU Munich and LfU Bayern presented the topic "Persistent, Mobile and Toxic Substances" from different perspectives. About 20 AK members and guests took part in the meeting, which took place in the Federal Environment Agency in Berlin. Minutes of the meeting are available upon request. The last meeting took place in May 2019 and dealt with the topic of biota monitoring with contributions on fish monitoring in the context of the Water Framework Directive and on the retrospective investigation of methylsiloxanes in fish from the environmental specimen bank. Another AK meeting is planned for October 2019. The AK management will be happy to provide further information on the Working Group Environmental Monitoring .

2012 - 2017

2017

As in previous years, the members of the environmental monitoring working group met for two meetings in 2017, at which various topics were presented by AK members or external speakers. Approximately 15 members and guests attended the meetings. Both meetings took place in Berlin. More Mitt Umweltchem Ökotox 1/ 2018

2016

The members of the environmental monitoring working group organized two meetings in 2016, at which various topics were presented by AK members or external speakers and put up for discussion. About 15 people - members and guests - were present at the meetings. More Mitt Umweltchem Ökotox 4/16.

2015

In 2015, three meetings of the environmental monitoring working group (AK) were held, at which various topics were presented and discussed by members of the AK or external speakers. Approximately 15 people were present at each of the meetings. More Mitt Umweltchem Ökotox 4/15.

2012

On behalf of Dr. Heinz Rüdel informed Dr. Albrecht Paschke at the General Assembly meeting of the Division on September 12, 2012 in Leipzig, among other things, that in August 2012 about 60 people were approached by the GDCh in an info mail to become active members of the AK. In 2013 the new elections for the board of directors are coming up. Dr. Rüdel (Fraunhofer IME), Prof. Schröder (Vechta University) and Dr. von der Trenck (LUBW) stand for re-election. Prof. Wiesmüller no longer sees the possibility of re-candidate due to increased professional commitments. Other candidates are welcome. More Mitt Umweltchem Ökotox 4/ 2012

literature

With the publication of the position paper "Substance-related environmental monitoring" in Environ Sci Pollut Res (2009, 16: 486-498), the series of articles "Chemical and Biological Environmental Monitoring" was initiated, in which numerous articles by AK members have since been published.

Articles in the journal "Environmental Science Europe - ESEU"

Article Series: Communications from the division "Environmental Chemistry and Ecotoxicology" of the German Chemical Society (GDCh) Statements and reports of the working groups "Environmental Monitoring" and "Soil Chemistry and Soil Ecology"
Rudel H, Hennecke D, Kordel W and Fischer K
Environmental Sciences Europe 2011, 23:35 (10 November 2011)

Series of articles "Chemical and Biological Environmental Monitoring" (CBEM)

With the publication of the position paper "Substance-related environmental monitoring" in Environ Sci Pollut Res (2009, 16: 486-498), the series of articles "Chemical and Biological Environmental Monitoring" was initiated, in which numerous articles by AK members have since been published.

2013

W Kördel, H Garelick, BM Gawlik, NG Kandile, WJ Peijnenburg WJ, H Rüdel:
Substance-related environmental monitoring strategies regarding soil, groundwater and surface water - an overview
(Environ Sci Pollut Res March 2012, Volume 19 DOI: 10.1007/s11356-013-1531-2 )

2012

H. Rüdel, J. Müller, M. Quack, R. Klein:
Monitoring of hexabromocyclododecane diastereomers in fish from European freshwaters and estuaries (Environ Sci Pollut Res DOI: 10.1007/s11356-011-0604-3 )

N. Theobald, C. Caliebe, W. Gerwinski, H. Hühnerfuss, P. Lepom:
Occurrence of perfluorinated organic acids in the North and Baltic Seas. Part 2: distribution in sediments (Environ Sci Pollut Res DOI: 10.1007/s11356-011-0559-4 )

H. Rüdel, J. Müller, H. Jürling, M, Bartel-Steinbach, J. Koschorreck:
Survey of patterns, levels, and trends of perfluorinated compounds in aquatic organisms and bird eggs from representative German ecosystems
(Environ Sci Pollut Res (2011) 18:1457-1470 DOI: 10.1007/s11356-011-0501-9)

N. Theobald, C. Caliebe, W. Gerwinski, H. Hühnerfuss, P. Lepom:
Occurrence of perfluorinated organic acids in the North and Baltic seas: Part 1: Distribution in sea water (Environ Sci Pollut Res (2011) 18: 1057-1069 DOI: 10.1007/s11356-011-0451-2 )

2010

J Franzaring, I Holz, J Zipperle, A Fangmeier:
Twenty years of biological monitoring of element concentrations in permanent forest and grassland plots in Baden-Württemberg (SW-Germany)
(Environ Sci Pollut Res (2010), 17:4-12 DOI: 10.1007/s11356-009-0181-x )

B. Kuch, F. Kern, J. Metzger J, KT von der Trenck:
Effect-related monitoring: estrogen-like substances in groundwater
(Environ Sci Pollut Res (2010), 17:250-260 DOI: 10.1007/s11356-009-0234-1 )

J. Schwarzbauer, M. Ricking:
Non-target screening analysis of river water as a compound related base for monitoring measures (Environ Sci Pollut Res (2010), 17:934?947 DOI: 10.1007/s11356-009-0269-3 )

H. Rüdel, A. Fliedner, J. Kösters, C. Schröter-Kermani:
Twenty years of elemental analysis of marine biota within the German Specimen Bank - a thorough look at the data (Environ Sci Pollut Res (2010), 17:1025?1034 DOI: 10.1007/s11356-009-0280-8 )

M. Holy, G. Schmidt, W. Schröder:
Potential malaria outbreak in Germany due to climate warming: risk modeling based on temperature measurements and regional climate models
(Environment Sci Pollut Res DOI: 10.1007/s11356-010-0388-x )

G. Schmidt, M. Holy, R. Pesch, W. Schröder:
Changing plant phenology in Germany due to the effects of global warming
The International Journal of Climate Change. (Impacts & Responses (2010), 2:73?84 link )

W. Schroeder, R. Pesch:
Long-term monitoring of the metal accumulation in forests measured by use of the moss technique (Eur J Forest Res (2010), 129:475?488 DOI: 10.1007/s10342-009-0298-y )

M. Aden, G. Schmidt, S. Schönrock, W. Schröder:
Data analyzes with the WebGIS Forest IS (Eur J Forest Res (2010), 129:489-497 DOI: 10.1007/s10342-010-0370-7 )

2009

H: Rüdel, W. Schröder, K. Th. von der Trenck, GA Wiesmüller:
Preface to CBEM series (Environ Sci Pollut Res (2009), 16:483-484 DOI: 10.1007/s11356-009-0192-7 )

H Rüdel, K Bester, A Eisenträger, J Franzaring, M Haarich, J Köhler, W Körner, J Oehlmann, A Paschke, M Ricking, W Schröder, Ch Schröter-Kermani, T. Schulze, J. Schwarzbauer, N. Theobald, KT von der Trenck, G. Wagner, GA Wiesmüller:
Position paper on substance-related environmental monitoring
(Environ Sci Pollut Res (2009), 16:486-498 DOI: 10.1007/s11356-008-0085-1 )

M. Holy, S. Leblond, R. Pesch, W. Schröder:
Assessing Spatial Patterns of Metal Bioaccumulation in France by means of an Exposure Index (Environ Sci Pollut Res (2009), 16:499-507 DOI: 10.1007/s11356-009-0146-0 )

A Kiss, E Fries:
Occurrence of Benzotriazoles in German Rivers
(Environ Sci Pollut Res (2009), 16:702-710 DOI: 10.1007/s11356-009-0179-4 )

Overview of investigations into 'emerging substances' (status 05.02.11)

In recent years, environmental research has increasingly focused on new substances (?emerging substances?). This is partly due to the fact that these substances are newly released into the environment. Much more frequently, however, the cause lies in the fact that the analytical methods for recording them have only become available in recent years. In the 1990s, it was mainly the optimization of GC/MS equipment technology that led to improved detection sensitivities for non-polar or moderately polar substances and thus also made it possible to detect compounds that are only found in low concentrations in the environment. In recent years, more polar substances that can be quantified through the availability of routine HPLC/MS systems have played an increasing role.

A number of the scientists active in the Working Group Environmental Monitoring working group are investigating new pollutants in the various environmental media as well as in plant and animal samples. An overview of the work of recent years is compiled here. Investigations from the terrestrial area, from rivers and from the North and Baltic Seas are listed. The range of substances examined ranges from perfluorinated compounds to flame retardants and pesticide degradation products to organometallic compounds. Where already available, references to published work are given. In addition, the e-mail addresses of the respective contact persons are listed in order to enable direct contact for interested parties.

This compilation is intended to document that, despite all the improvements in environmental quality in recent decades, there are still a large number of substances in our environment that require monitoring. Some of the substances, such as certain DDT breakdown products, have an endocrine effect. For other substances, nothing is known about their possible effects. For some substances it is also discussed whether they meet the criteria as persistent organic pollutants according to the Stockholm Convention (eg HBCD). In this context, monitoring data can serve as supplementary information.

Main topic: Analysis of nanoparticles in complex media

Presentation by Dr. Frank von der Kammer, Head of the Working Group Environmental Monitoring Group and the Colloid Laboratory, University of Vienna on the 15th meeting of the Environmental Monitoring Working Group on November 27th, 2009 at the Federal Environment Agency, Bismarckplatz 1, 14195 Berlin

First of all, Herr von der Kammer goes into the definition of nanomaterials . This is done via the size (< 100 nm for at least one dimension), but the rigid limit chosen is not necessarily sensible. In addition to engineered nanoparticles (ENP), natural NPs are also present in the environment. In terms of size, natural NPs are a subset of the particles known as colloids, which range in size from 1 - 1000 nm. In contrast to the natural NPs, however, the technically produced ones are usually very uniform. In environmental media, the NPs are mostly not present as free particles, but as aggregated clusters. Depending on the conditions, larger or smaller aggregates can form, including mixed ones, eg with biopolymers or inorganic particles. ENPs can also change in the environment (eg zinc NPs that dissolve, or functionalized NPs where the surface coating can degrade).

The environmental relevance of colloids has been discussed since 1989, as they can carry contaminants (McCarthy and Zachara: Subsurface transport of contaminants. Environ. Sci Technol 1989, 23:496-502; link). Studies on the environmental relevance of technical NP have only been available for a few years. The first investigations into the effects of ENP on organisms (eg fish toxicity) became known about five years ago. The analysis of ENP in complex matrices has so far only been partially successful. In this context, Herr von der Kammer refers to a statement by the EU food safety authority EFSA on the analysis of ENP in food (link). This deficit is also the background for an EU project in which the University of Vienna is involved and in which appropriate routine methods are to be developed.

In situ methods for examining NPs are not yet available, so that before the measurement, a sample preparation that changes the original conditions to a greater or lesser extent is necessary. Depending on the question, the NP in the sample must be stabilized, possibly pre-fractionated and finally added.

Imaging methods such as electron microscopy are very helpful for investigating NPs, as Herr von der Kammer impressively shows with a number of examples. However, the method is not suitable as a "gold standard" since artefacts can easily arise during the preparation and the evaluation is subjective. With EM investigations, elements in the particles can also be analyzed with suitable devices (EDX, energy dispersive X-ray spectroscopy). Using this methodology, Kaegi et al. (Environ Pollut 2008) demonstrate, for example, synthetic titanium dioxide NPs from paints in facade drains or Kiser et al. (ES&T 2009) Titanium dioxide NPs in sewage sludge.

The investigation with the 'laser induced breakdown spectrometry' (LIBD; measuring principle: plasma excitation and atomic emission spectrometry; link) is regarded as promising. Other methods that are suitable for the corresponding size range of the NP: atomic force microscopy, flow-field flow fractionation, light scattering methods (dynamic light scattering, DLS), scattering of X-rays and neutrons. Ultrafiltration or separations based on density (sedimentation/centrifugation) can also be useful for some questions. A light microscopy technique that can be used for specific purposes is nanoparticle tracking analysis (NTA). Here, the size distribution (from approx. 20-40 nm) and concentration of the NPs in suspensions is calculated via the diffusion movement.

The choice of the appropriate method depends on the respective objective of the investigation. Should ENPs only be detected or identified qualitatively, should they be quantified, or should a more extensive characterization take place via its set of parameters? When quantifying, the question arises as to what exactly should be determined: e.g. the number or concentration of the NP, the type or chemical composition (e.g. natural NP/ENP; carbon-based/metallic NP; possibly functionalized NP), the size or size distribution, the degree of agglomeration, the shape, the surface (so far only measurable for solids using gas adsorption using the BET method according to Brunauer, Emmett and Teller), the surface charge (e.g. as zeta potential), the pore volume ? It is becoming apparent that a single method is not sufficient for a comprehensive investigation. Herr von der Kammer explains that certain methods are only optimal for relatively homogeneous mixtures of NPs (e.g. light scattering, where measurement-related large particles interfere with the investigation of smaller NPs). The particle shape determined for NP also depends strongly on the measurement or evaluation method used (especially in the case of irregular particle shapes only approximations).

Another aspect that complicates studies of NP is that representative sampling that does not alter NP distribution and agglomeration from matrices such as soil, sediment or sewage sludge is also difficult.
In the following, Herr von der Kammer goes into more detail about asymmetric flow-field flow fractionation (AF4). This technique for size separation of particles has great potential, since various detectors can be coupled to the separation chamber, which allow a comprehensive characterization of the NPs separated according to their size (e.g. UV, fluorescence, DLS, ICP-MS, TOF- MS). By coupling flow-FFF and single particle ICP-MS, platinum particles from car exhaust gas catalysts and tungsten particles from tire abrasion could be detected in street runoff water. The platinum NPs were not visible in the transmission EM because they were only present in very low concentrations.

Finally, Herr von der Kammer shows a number of examples that demonstrate the possibilities of the various methods. His conclusion is that further investigations must clarify which are the critical parameters of the environmental relevance of NP, that method-oriented investigation approaches are required, and that the various methods should be used in a complementary manner.

The discussion showed that some colleagues are interested in a further exchange of information on the analysis of ENP as well as in joint process development. Herr von der Kammer also refers to the ?Aquatic Nanoscience and Nanotechnology? specialist committee of the

Data portals for substance-related environmental monitoring (overview)

Links to data portals for substance-related environmental monitoring, including the Federal Environmental Specimen Bank, UNDINE information platform and ICPR data portal

Federal Environmental Specimen Bank
www.umweltprobenbank.de/de/documents/investigations/analytes
Category: inland waters, coastal waters, terrestrial ecosystems
Sample types: biological samples, suspended matter in water, soil
The results of time series investigations can be called up in the database of the Federal Environmental Specimen Bank (UPB) (output of measurement data as tables, graphics or as files that can be further processed). Metals and persistent organic compounds (POPs) are examined in the routine program. Retrospective special investigations by the UPB have been carried out, for example, on exposure to perfluorinated compounds (e.g. PFOS), organotin compounds (e.g. TBT), musk fragrances or brominated flame retardants (e.g. HBCD). Background information on the UPB, the substances examined, the biological and abiotic samples, as well as results and reports can also be accessed on the UPB portal. Results from human biomonitoring can also be called up (Federal Environmental Specimen Bank ? Human Specimens).

UNDINE information platform:
http://undine.bafg.de
Category: inland waters (currently Elbe, Oder, Rhine)
Sample types: water, water suspended matter
For a supra-regional view of the major rivers Elbe, Oder, Rhine, Danube (in progress) and Weser (in progress), the information platform "Undine" presents compact descriptions of historical hydrological extreme events (high water, low water), current water quality measurements as well as historical comparative values and refers to various sources of information. One focus of the consideration is on the representation of the water quality in extreme events

ICPR data portal
https://www.iksr.org
Category: Inland waterways - Rhine
Sample Types: Water, Aquatic Suspended Matter
Here, the International Commission for the Protection of the Rhine (ICPR) provides numerical tables of the physical-chemical analyzes of the Rhine water and the suspended matter. Results of the coordinated measurement programs (international and national) for the water quality of the Rhine and selected tributaries are shown in tables. With a download module, the individual data recorded over many years can be used for your own evaluations.

Data portal of the LANUV North Rhine-Westphalia
http://luadb.lds.nrw.de/LUA/gues/welcome.htm
Category: inland waters NRW
Sample type: water
The State Agency for Nature, Environment and Consumer Protection (LANUV NRW) makes monitoring data on water quality available online (e.g. data on metals, perfluorinated compounds and pesticides and biocides). Part of the data comes from alarm monitoring or from continuous measurements.

Specialist information system of the FGG Elbe:
http://www.fgg-elbe.de/elbe-datenportal.html
Category: Inland Waterways - Elbe
Sample types: water, suspended matter in water, sediments, biota
The specialist information system (FIS) of the Elbe River Basin Community (FGG) offers the possibility of retrieving and evaluating historical and current specialist data that have been collected at important measuring stations in the Elbe catchment area as part of the national measuring programs. The output can also be made as a data file.

NORMAN Database EMPODAT
https://www.norman-network.com/nds/empodat/
Category: inland waters, coastal waters, terrestrial ecosystems
Sample types: water, suspended matter in water, soil, biological samples
The NORMAN network is an international association of institutions and research facilities that deal with investigations into the occurrence and effects of "emerging substances" - ie substances that are not (yet) adequately recorded in current monitoring. The EMPODAT database provides Europe-wide geo-referenced monitoring data with a focus on water body monitoring (including sediments and biota). Registration is required to use the NORMAN databases (to confirm the terms of use).

Authors: Dr. Martin Keller (BfG, Koblenz), Dr. Heinz Rüdel (Fraunhofer IME, Schmallenberg). The list is continuously updated (please send hints and comments to Heinz Rüdel, heinz.ruedel@ime.fraunhofer.de). Status: June 2013

Contact

dr Heinz Rüdel
Fraunhofer Institute for Molecular Biology and Applied Ecology,
on the Aberg 1,
57392 Schmallenberg
e-mail

Board

Dr. Heinz Rüdel, Schmallenberg
Prof. Dr. Winfried Schröder, University of Vechta
Prof. Dr. Jan Schwarzbauer
, RWTH Aachen

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last modified: 17.06.2022 11:29 H from Translator