Press releases 2018

43 Statement by the German Chemical Society on "Plan S"

Open Access: GDCh sees a need for improvement in the ?Plan S? of eleven research funding organizations from Europe

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December 11, 2018

The board of the German Chemical Society (GDCh) adopted a statement on the so-called "Plan S" at its last meeting on December 6, 2018. The GDCh supports the fundamental intention of Plan S, but expresses clear criticism on some points.

The cOAlition S, an association of eleven research funding organizations from Europe, published the so-called Plan S on September 4, 2018. This plan defines in ten principles the framework conditions for the research results financed by these funding organizations for the transition to Open Access (www.coalition-s.org/10-principles).

The GDCh supports the basic intention of Plan S and expressly welcomes some of the formulated principles. For others, however, she has serious concerns that some of the key issues will have significant harmful effects on the scientists concerned and on Europe as a research location.

The German Chemical Society (GDCh) commits itself in its statutes to the promotion of the scientific publication and information system. It therefore supports all activities that serve this goal, in particular also Open Access, i.e. free access for readers to the digital content of publications including extended usage options. However, the GDCh has repeatedly pointed out, most recently with its position paper ?On the Future of Scientific Publishing? from December 2013, that all of these activities must serve science. In addition, they must not hinder authors and must be based on resilient and sustainable business models.

The GDCh criticizes the fact that, according to the "Guidance on the Implementation of Plan S" of November 27, 2018, preprint servers should explicitly not meet the requirement of OA publication. Together with its sister companies from the USA and Great Britain, the GDCh recently set up the preprint server ChemRxiv and thus makes a significant contribution to Open Access. The GDCh also considers the stipulation that hybrid journals, i.e. subscription journals in which authors can publish their contribution Open Access for a fee, are not compatible with the Plan S principles. About 85% of all journals, including all renowned and selective journals in chemistry, such as Angew. Chem. And J. Am. Chem. Soc., Are affected and are no longer available for authors who are bound to Plan S. This will have serious negative effects on authors, readers and the specialist societies concerned.

"We also fear that a standardization and limitation of the author's fees will result in high-quality journals, whose costs per article are necessarily higher due to the high rejection rate, coming under great economic pressure," says GDCh managing director Prof. Dr. Wolfram Koch. ?In chemistry, this also applies first and foremost to the journals published by us or other specialist societies. Qualitatively average or even inferior journals will benefit from this business model and the number of so-called predatory journals will increase to the detriment of science. "

In its position paper of December 2013, the GDCh expressly acknowledged the freedom of researchers and explicitly rejected mandates that oblige researchers to publish open access. The exclusion of hybrid journals formulated in Plan S, the obligation to place the published work under the most liberal, open license possible (preferably CC-BY), as well as the threatened sanctions for non-compliance are significant encroachments on the freedom of the researcher, which the GDCh, not least with a view to Article 5, Paragraph 3 of the Basic Law, cannot agree.

The GDCh appeals to the supporters of Plan S to incorporate the concerns of the GDCh and its more than 30,000 members from the chemical sciences in future considerations and implementation plans. The legitimate goal of making scientific results freely accessible to everyone must not be thwarted by unintended, scientifically harmful consequences.

The full statement in full is published at https://www.gdch.de/service-information/nachricht/article/stellungnahme-der-gesellschaft-deutscher-chemiker-zu-plan-s.html.

With over 30,000 members, the German Chemical Society is the largest chemical science society in continental Europe. In its statutes , the GDCh undertakes to promote scientific publication and information. It is the owner or co-owner of around 20 internationally renowned scientific journals, including Angewandte Chemie, one of the world's leading chemistry journals.

42 René Deplanque receives Gmelin-Beilstein commemorative medal

Award ceremony at the German Conference on Chemoinformatics in Mainz

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November 6, 2018

The German Chemical Society (GDCh) honors Professor Dr. René Deplanque, Lübeck, with the Gmelin-Beilstein commemorative coin. The award will be presented to him on November 12th at the ?14th German Conference on Chemoinformatics?, the annual meeting of the GDCh division ?Computers in Chemistry? in Mainz.

The Gmelin-Beilstein commemorative coin, a silver medal that is associated with a certificate and a monetary amount, is awarded by the GDCh to national and international personalities who have made special contributions to the History of Chemistry, chemical literature or chemical information have acquired. Professor Dr. René Deplanque is one of the best-known chemical information managers in Germany and has shaped and influenced the German and international chemical information field significantly and sustainably. The GDCh honors him for the establishment of numerous important chemical information services and databases. Among other things, the elaboration, continuation and digitization of the "Gmelin" (Gmelin's handbook of inorganic chemistry) is one of his merits.

Born in Lübeck in 1950, Deplanque initially studied chemical engineering at the University of Hamburg. After graduating, he earned a Masters in Electrochemistry and a PhD in Physical Chemistry from Sir John Cass College, London Guildhall University in the UK. After a few years as a lecturer at Cambridge University and further years in the chemical industry, he took over the overall project management of the digitization of the Gmelin manual at the Max Planck Society in Frankfurt as a member of the management of the Gmelin Institute. From 1994 to 2011, Deplanque headed the Specialized Information Center for Chemistry (FIZ CHEMIE) in Berlin, initially as scientific and from 2005 as sole managing director. In 2001, the Technical University (TU) Berlin awarded him an honorary professorship for Physical Chemistry. From 2012 to 2014 he was the first German General Secretary of the international chemistry association IUPAC. Deplanque is currently President of RD-Publisher, Berlin and Managing Director of INCOT.NET, Lübeck.

The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 27 specialist groups, including the Computers in Chemistry (CIC) division with over 450 members. The division was founded in 1982 because the computer-aided management, archiving, analysis, querying and generation of information became more and more important in chemistry. It sees its main task in bringing together national and foreign scientists interested in information and documentation as well as computer applications in chemistry in order to convey and further develop the latest findings in this field of knowledge through a lively exchange of ideas and experiences.

41 Fit for Chemistry 4.0?

New training program with courses on digitization in chemistry

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5th November 2018

From classic chemistry topics to career issues - the 2019 advanced training program of the German Chemical Society (GDCh) offers many opportunities to develop professionally, professionally and personally. Those interested in further training can choose from 88 courses in 15 subject areas in the coming year. In addition to classic topics and the tried and tested GDCh specialist programs, a focus in the coming year will be on ?Chemistry 4.0?.

Digitization and automation have also found their way into chemistry. Information and communication technology simplifies daily work in many areas. In order to be able to use the full potential of the so-called ?Industry 4.0?, however, a certain amount of know-how is required. For this reason, an entire subject area of the new advanced training program for 2019 is dedicated to "Chemistry 4.0". In 22 courses, those interested in continuing education can prepare themselves for digitization in the chemical industry in the various areas.

Many of the training courses deal with quality assurance, such as the ?Quality Systems GMP and GLP? course, which gives a practice-oriented overview of the intentions and characteristics of these quality assurance systems. But Analytical Chemistry has long since ceased to be able to do without digitization. In ?Basics of practical NMR Spectroscopy for technical staff?, the participants learn how modern digital NMR spectrometers work. Due to the high demand, there will also be an advanced course for the first time in 2019, which will focus on specialized applications. Further courses deal with modern methods and procedures. In ?Big Data - Basics, Methods and Practical Implementation?, participants learn to analyze complex amounts of data independently.

But classic topics such as Analytical Chemistry, synthesis methods or courses from the field of chemistry and economics continue to be part of the training program. The course ?Legally regulated environmental analysis - what is really important?? Gives an overview of analysis methods, AQA and other regulations for accredited and notified environmental laboratories. A new course for young chemists has also been added to the program. In ?Power Factors in Business Practice?, young chemists receive a well-founded overview of the different interests of the various actors in the company and tips on how to meet them.

The proven GDCh specialist programs "Certified Business Chemist (GDCh) ®" and "Certified Quality Expert GxP" as well as the advanced program "Certified Quality Expert GxP Plus" will also be offered in 2019.

In all courses, the participants benefit from speakers with a high level of experience and competence. Detailed information and the program for download can be found at www.gdch.de/fortbildung. The printed program can be requested from fb@gdch.de.

The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of scientific knowledge. The GDCh supports training in schools and universities as well as continuous training for work and Career.

40 In the field of tension between chemistry and economy

Conference "Circular Economy" of the Association for Chemistry and Economics

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1st November 2018

What effects does the circular economy have on companies in the chemical industry? The conference "Circular Economy", to which the Association for Chemistry and Economics (VCW), a division of the German Chemical Society (GDCh), is inviting you to Leverkusen on November 7, 2018, revolves around this central question. The event is supported by Covestro AG.

With the Circular Economy (CE), resources are used efficiently and waste and emissions are minimized or recycled. In this way, not only an economic, but also an ecological and social benefit can be achieved at the same time. Around 120 decision-makers from companies in the chemical industry and related sectors will discuss in Leverkusen whether the circular economy is an idealistic vision, a regulatory nightmare or the next great opportunity. Renowned experts from among others BASF, Clariant, Covestro, Infraserv Höchst and the German Chemical Industry Association (VCI) give the participants an insight into their experiences and findings. Three startups also have the opportunity to present their visions in short pitches.

Further information on the conference at www.gdch.de/vcw-ce18

The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 27 specialist groups, including the Association for Chemistry and Economics, which emerged in 2002 from the Working Group for Chemistry and Business, which was founded in 1999. The VCW has set itself the goal of combining natural sciences, especially chemistry, and economics.

39 Biofuel made from straw

Meyer Galow Prize for Business Chemistry 2018 goes to Markus Rarbach

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October 31, 2018

Dr. Markus Rarbach, Clariant, receives the Meyer Galow Prize for Business Chemistry on November 14th. The prize, endowed with 10,000 euros, is awarded by the foundation of the same name, which is part of the German Chemical Society (GDCh). The award is given to scientists who have advanced a current innovation in chemistry. Rarbach and his team have developed the sunliquid® technology, which can be used to produce biofuel that is almost greenhouse gas-neutral, and has successfully launched this technology on the market. The award ceremony takes place during a ceremony in the Clariant Innovation Center, Frankfurt, and is presented by GDCh President Dr. Matthias Urmann made.

With the sunliquid® technology, sustainable and almost climate-neutral biofuel can be produced, with which fossil energy sources can be replaced. The so-called cellulosic ethanol can be produced from plant waste. For example, wheat and corn stalks are converted into cellulosic sugar. A subsequent fermentation turns the sugar into cellulosic ethanol. The sunliquid® technology made it possible to develop new raw materials for the production of biofuels and at the same time improve their performance and the environmental profile. Cellulosic sugars can also be used as raw materials for the future production of bio-based chemicals.

Dr. Markus Rarbach, Head of Business Line Biofuels & Derivatives at Clariant, developed the sunliquid® technology together with his team and successfully launched it on the market. Clariant is currently building the first large-scale sunliquid® system in Romania. At full capacity, the plant will process around 250,000 tons of wheat and other cereal straw obtained from local farmers into 50,000 tons of cellulosic ethanol per year.

"With this award for this innovation we want to show how biocatalytic syntheses are gaining in importance and making our world a better place", explains the founder Professor Dr. Erhard Meyer-Galow .

In addition to numerous invited guests, Dr. Hariolf Kottmann, Chairman of the Board of Directors of Clariant, GDCh President Dr. Matthias Urmann and the founder Professor Dr. Erhard Meyer-Galow attend. The laudation for the award winner will be given by Dr. Günter von Au, member of the Clariant Board of Directors.

?Innovations and their implementation in marketable products are topics that are very close to my heart. In chemistry, we have many creative minds with good ideas. We have to support them in turning good ideas into successful products. That is why we are very happy to award the Meyer-Galow Prize, which honors such successful projects, ?explains GDCh President Dr. Matthias Urmann.

?It is a great honor for Clariant that Markus Rarbach and his team have been awarded the Meyer-Galow Prize. The sunliquid® technology is not only of great importance for Clariant, but also pioneering the development of sustainable and progressive biofuels worldwide, ?explains Dr. Hariolf Kottmann, Chairman of the Board of Directors of Clariant.

The Meyer Galow Prize for Business Chemistry is awarded annually to scientists in German-speaking countries who have successfully introduced a current innovation in chemistry to the market. The focus is on market launches that primarily take sustainability into account. The prize is awarded annually by the Meyer Galow Foundation for Business Chemistry, which is part of the GDCh. Founder is Professor Dr. Erhard Meyer-Galow, the former CEO of Hüls AG and former President of the GDCh. Meyer-Galow mainly worked at the interface between chemistry and the market and gave lectures on business chemistry at the University of Münster.

The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 27 specialist groups as well as 60 local associations and regional young chemists forums. The GDCh promotes scientific work as well as the exchange and dissemination of new scientific findings. It maintains numerous foundations, such as the Meyer Galow Foundation for Business Chemistry, which Professor Dr. Erhard Meyer-Galow in 2012 to further promote business chemistry.

Clariant is a global leader in specialty chemicals based in Muttenz near Basel in Switzerland. As of December 31, 2017, the company employed a total of 18,135 people. In the 2017 financial year, Clariant achieved sales of CHF 6.377 billion with its continuing business activities. The company reports in four business areas: Care Chemicals, Catalysis, Natural Resources and Plastics & Coatings. Clariant's corporate strategy is based on five pillars: focus on innovation and research & development, added value while at the same time being sustainable, repositioning the portfolio, intensifying growth and increasing profitability.

Contact:

Dr. Karin J. Schmitz
German Chemical Society eV
public relation
Tel. +49 69 7917-493
Fax +49 69 7917-1493
Email: pr@gdch.de
www.gdch.de/presse

Anne Maier
Clariant
Corporate communications
Tel. +41 61 469 61 42
Email: anne.maier@clariant.com
www.clariant.com

Markus Rarbach erhält den Meyer-Galow-Preis für Wirtschaftschemie 2018. Foto: Clariant

38 Scholarship for chemistry students: 300 euros per month

Hofmann scholarships 2019 announced

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October 30, 2018

The August Wilhelm von Hofmann Foundation set up by the German Chemical Society (GDCh) is also awarding scholarships to support students for the 2019 summer semester. Bachelor students in chemistry and related fields can receive a scholarship of 300 euros per month from April 2019 with a duration of 18 or 12 months. Applications must be submitted by February 1, 2019 to the respective GDCh local association chairperson or the spokesperson for the regional forums of the JungChemikerForum (JCF).

Bachelor students in chemistry and related fields with very good academic achievements who are in an economically unfavorable situation can apply for one of the approximately 20 scholarships of the August Wilhelm von Hofmann Foundation. Another requirement is that the students are in the third to last or penultimate semester of their bachelor's degree at the beginning of the 2018 summer semester.

The scholarship cannot be extended. Every year in the winter semester there is a new application cycle. The scholarship is not counted towards BAföG benefits, but double funding in addition to other performance-based material funding from the gifted funding agencies is excluded.

The August Wilhelm von Hofmann Foundation is named after the first president of the GDCh predecessor organization, the German Chemical Society, founded in 1867. The founder is a long-standing GDCh member who died in 2010 and who bequeathed the majority of his assets to the GDCh to support talented chemistry students.

Further information at www.gdch.de/hofmannstiftung.

The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with around 31,000 members. The GDCh manages numerous dependent foundations on a fiduciary basis. The purpose of these foundations is to award prizes, sponsorship awards and grants. In addition to the August Wilhelm von Hofmann Foundation, the Karl Ziegler Foundation deserves a special mention. With the Karl Ziegler Prize, the GDCh award, which is worth 50,000 euros, is awarded for outstanding scientific achievements in chemistry. Also worth mentioning are the Paul Bunge Prize awarded by the Hans R. Jenemann Foundation, as well as the awards from the Hermann Schnell, Hellmut Bredereck, Georg Manecke, Klaus Grohe and Meyer Galow Foundation . Foundation advisory boards decide on the award of prizes, awards and grants.

37 Business Chemistry Study Prize 2018 from the Association for Chemistry and Economics to Anja Müsch

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October 25, 2018

The Association for Chemistry and Economics, a division of the German Chemical Society (GDCh), is awarding the Business Chemistry Study Prize this year to Anja Müsch, a graduate of the master's degree in Business Chemistry at Heinrich Heine University in Düsseldorf. The responsible committee cited the excellent performance during the entire course and the flexibility of the award winner to acquire practical experience and interdisciplinary knowledge as justification for the prize, which is endowed with 1000 euros.

The 26-year-old completed her studies in business chemistry at Heinrich Heine University in April of this year with a 1.0 - the best grade since the master?s course was introduced. In addition to her interdisciplinary studies, Anja Müsch was also involved in an interdisciplinary manner at the university and, among other things, took on coordinating and teaching activities at the Faculty of Natural Sciences and Economics. In addition, the award winner has already actively and successfully gained insights into professional practice at Bayer and Merck. During her master's degree, the award winner supported Merck's Science Relations team, in which she increasingly dealt with the interaction between science and business and the innovation potentials contained therein. Today, Müsch works as a graduate in Merck's in-house consulting.

The VCW Business Chemistry Study Prize is announced annually in German-speaking countries and honors excellent academic achievements in the field of business chemistry. The aim of the Business Chemistry Study Prize is to sharpen the profile of the subject within the natural science faculty. In particular, the subject of business chemistry and the award-winning graduates are to be made better known in the industrial environment in order to emphasize the attractiveness of the course for students.

The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 27 specialist groups, including the Association for Chemistry and Economics (VCW). The VCW has set itself the goal of combining natural sciences, especially chemistry, and economics.

Anja Müsch erhält den Studienpreis Wirtschaftschemie.

36 47th German Food Chemists Day 2018

Awards for food chemists

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18th September 2018

On the occasion of the 47th German Food Chemists' Day in Berlin, the Food Chemistry Society (LChG), a division of the German Chemical Society (GDCh), today honored chemists for their special scientific achievements. The Adolf Juckenack Medal went to Dr. Jörg Häseler, Berlin. The Werner Baltes Prize of the Young Scientist was awarded to Dr. Daniel Wefers, Karlsruhe. Dr. Claudia Oellig, Hohenheim honored: In addition to the Bruno Roßmann Prize, she received a Joseph Schormüller grant. In addition, the GDCh awarded Dr. Stefan Spreng, Orbe / CH, with the Gerhard Billek Prize.

The Food Chemistry Society awards the Adolf Juckenack Medal to personalities who have supported the work of the Food Chemistry Society through years of personal commitment in important positions or who have promoted the profession of food chemist through their work. That year, Dr. Jörg Häseler, Berlin, the award on behalf of all those who were involved in the founding of the Young Food Chemists (AG JLC). As the founding chairman, Häseler co-initiated the establishment of the JLC AG in 1997 and shaped its work with great commitment in terms of content and structure. In the 21 years of its existence, the JLC AG has developed into an extremely committed, dynamic and active working group within the food chemical society and contributes in particular to its visibility and further development.

With the Werner Baltes Prize of the Young Scientist, Dr. Daniel Wefers, Karlsruhe Institute of Technology, honored. With the award, the LChG honors special scientific achievements of young specialist colleagues. This year the 31-year-old received the 2000 euro award for his fundamental work in the field of chemistry and functionality of hydrocolloids, in particular polysaccharides from algae and microbial exopolysaccharides. A promising strategy for developing functional foods can be derived from his research.

With the Bruno Roßmann Prize, the Food Chemistry Society honors outstanding scientific work that deals with rapid methods for the detection of harmful substances in food, methods for examining food with simple means as well as the improvement of nutrition, the reduction of pollutants and better physiological utilization. This year the award was given to Dr. Claudia Oellig, University of Hohenheim, awarded for her work on the subject of "Screening methods for the determination of ergot and ergot alkaloids in rye". With its practice-oriented research, it contributes to improving food safety. Oellig also receives a grant for a stay abroad from the Josef Schormüller Memorial Foundation.

The Gerhard Billek Prize for the best dissertation in the field of Food Chemistry to Dr. Stefan Spreng, Nestlé Product Technology Center, Orbe / CH. This prize is announced by the GDCh for scientific originality and an interdisciplinary approach. In his work he addressed the complex processes involved in the formation of antioxidants in beer brewing and the bitter chemistry of beer. As part of his research, in collaboration with beverage technologists, he succeeded in identifying key steps in the technological process for optimizing the oxidative stability of beers.

Further information at: www.gdch.de/lchtag2018

The German Chemical Society , with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 27 specialist groups, including the Food Chemistry Society, whose task it is to promote the exchange of ideas in the field of Food Chemistry and its related disciplines and to provide technical suggestions. With around 3000 members, the Food Chemistry Society is the largest division in the GDCh.

35 Chemistry and Energy for a common future

Chemistry and Energy division meets in Mülheim

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13th September 2018

From September 30th to October 2nd, the Chemistry and Energy division of the German Chemical Society (GDCh) invites you to its annual meeting at the Max Planck Institute for Coal Research in Mülheim an der Ruhr. The program includes exciting lectures at the interface between Chemistry and Energy.

As a scientific discipline, chemistry is of central importance for the development of energy storage systems and converters. For example, chemists are researching materials and processes for developing new solar cells, alternative fuels and batteries. Experts from science and industry meet in Mülheim to exchange ideas about current research and its application and to develop common visions for the future. Proven experts have been recruited for the plenary lectures, including Professor Dr. Stefan Kaskel, Technical University of Dresden, Professor Dr. Uwe Schröder, Technical University of Braunschweig, and Dr. Reinhold Achatz, Thyssenkrupp AG, Essen. In addition, Prof. Dr. Dr. Franz-Josef Brüggemeier, University of Freiburg, will give a historical review of 150 years of industrial coal mining in his plenary lecture, which will come to an end this year when coal mining in Germany is phased out.

Further information on the conference at www.gdch.de/energie2018

With around 31,000 members, the German Chemical Society is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It organizes international and national conferences as well as advanced training courses in all areas of chemistry. In 2006, the GDCh energy initiative and the chemical energy research coordination group were launched to raise awareness of the fact that chemists can make a major contribution to solving the energy problem. In March 2009, the GDCh working group for Chemistry and Energy was founded, which was transferred to a GDCh division on January 1, 2016 with almost 300 members and currently has around 400 members.

34 contemporary witnesses report from chemistry

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11th September 2018

The industrial division of the History of Chemistry of the German Chemical Society (GDCh), is holding this year's eyewitness conference at the invitation of InfraLeuna GmbH on September 27 and 28, 2018 in Leuna. The fact that this location was chosen for the third time (after 1996 and 2003) is due to the great and symbolic importance that Leuna has for the history of the chemical industry in Germany. During the conference , contemporary witnesses report on the development of the chemical industry over the past few decades. A total of 17 contributions were submitted. In addition to scientific achievements, the individual speakers also address historical, political and economic challenges that the chemical industry has dealt with in the past. For example, the conference deal with ?The history of liquid crystals from the point of view of a Merck chemist?, ?The Chancellor's promise to preserve the chemical triangle from May 1991 and its implementation? and ?Investment policy in a socialist centrally planned economy at the Bitterfeld-Wolfen location - a consideration in historical perspective ?.

Further information on the conference at www.gdch.de/chemiegeschichte

The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. She has 27 professional groups, including the division History of Chemistry. The industrial group of the division aims to give the history of the chemical industry and technology a higher priority.

33 From Research to Application: The Latest Trends in Inorganic Chemistry

Joint specialist group conference with award ceremonies in Regensburg

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6th September 2018

From September 24th to 27th, a joint lecture conference for Inorganic Chemistry of the Wöhler Association and Solid State Chemistry and Solid-State Chemistry and Materials Research take place for the first time. At the University of Regensburg, the two specialist groups of the German Chemical Society (GDCh) will present the latest trends from all areas of inorganic chemistry. During the conference , numerous scientists will be honored for their outstanding research. This is how Professor Dr. Christian Limberg received the prestigious Alfred Stock Memorial Prize of the GDCh.

The program of the conference includes interdisciplinary topics that represent the entire spectrum of modern inorganic and solid-state chemistry through to industrial applications and important future topics. The spectrum of the lectures ranges from dynamic main group element chemistry to innovative coordination chemistry of d- and f-block elements to versatile solid-state and material chemistry in basic research and industrial application.

Right at the beginning of the conference on September 24th, Professor Dr. Christian Limberg, Humboldt University Berlin, the Alfred Stock Memorial Prize. With the award, the GDCh honors his extensive work on oxygen complexes and oxidation reactions. In his research he combines ideas from organometallic, bioinorganic and solid-state chemistry and contributes to a deeper understanding of oxidation and oxygenation reactions.

Limberg, born in Essen in 1965, studied chemistry at the Ruhr University in Bochum. After receiving his doctorate in 1992, he also obtained his doctorate in 1995 from the University of Oxford, UK. In 1999 Limberg completed his habilitation at the Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg. In 2003 he accepted an appointment at the Humboldt University in Berlin, where he continues to research and teach to this day. The multiple award-winning chemist (including the Carl Duisberg Memorial Prize of the GDCh in 2002) was and is active in numerous committees in which he advocates Inorganic Chemistry .

At the conference , the Wöhler-BASF Young Talent Award, endowed with 5000 euros, will also be given to Dr. Fabian Dielmann, Westfälische Wilhelms-Universität Münster, awarded. As the key to numerous catalytic processes, Dielmann develops methods for activating particularly inert small molecules (e.g. CO 2, SF 6, H 2, SO 2, N 2 ) and strong CF and CO bonds. His internationally acclaimed research work in the field of electron-rich phosphines opens up new areas of application for this class of substances and also offers promising perspectives for the very diverse areas of synthetic chemistry in which phosphines are used.

The equally endowed with 5,000 euros Starck promotion price of the division for Solid-State Chemistry and Materials Research share this year Dr. Sebastian Bette, Technical University Bergakademie Freiberg, and Dr. Chia-Chin Chen, Max Planck Institute for Solid State Research, Stuttgart. They receive the award for their outstanding doctoral theses in the field of Solid-State Chemistry and Materials Research.

As part of the conference , Professor Dr. Mathias Wickleder, University of Cologne, was awarded the Rudolf Hoppe lecture endowed with 1000 euros. Thus the division Solid-State Chemistry and Materials Research recognizes his outstanding service in the field of Solid-State Chemistry and Materials Research within the last five years.

Further information on the conference at www.2018woehler-fk.de

With around 31,000 members, the German Chemical Society is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 27 specialist groups as well as 60 local associations and regional young chemists forums. The GDCh promotes scientific work as well as the exchange and dissemination of new scientific findings. It supports the creation of networks, transdisciplinary and international cooperation and continuous education and training at school, university and at work.

32 leading polymer researchers visit Karlsruhe

Brigitte Voit receives the Hermann Staudinger Prize
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4th September 2018

On September 24, 2018, the German Chemical Society (GDCh) honored Professor Dr. Brigitte Voit, Leibniz Institute for Polymer Research, Dresden, with the Hermann Staudinger Prize. The ceremony takes place on the occasion of the international conference "Dimensional Control of Polymer Materials - From Synthesis to Function", the division aligns the GDCh Macromolecular Chemistry in close coordination with the Collaborative Research Center "Molecular Structuring of Soft Matter" (SFB 1176) at the Karlsruhe Institute of Technology . The Reimund Stadler Prize and two Dr. Hermann Schnell scholarships awarded.

Voit (55) receives the Hermann Staudinger Prize for her impressive achievements in the field of macromolecular chemistry. The chemist began her scientific Career at the University of Bayreuth. After studying chemistry, which she completed with a doctorate there in 1990, she completed her habilitation in 1996 at the Technical University of Munich. At the age of 34 she took over the professorship for "Organic Chemistry of Polymers" at the Technical University of Dresden and head of the IPF Institute for Macromolecular Chemistry at the Leibniz Institute for Polymer Research Dresden eV. Voit has also been Scientific Director of the Leibniz Institute since 2002. She is internationally recognized as an expert in branched polymer architectures, functional polymers and biofunctional systems. In addition to her research work, Voit has achieved outstanding achievements for the visibility of German and European polymer research by creating scientific networks. In 2000 she was awarded the Georg Manecke Prize of the GDCh.

At the conference , the Reimund Stadler Prize will also be given to Dr.-Ing. Markus Gallei, Technical University of Darmstadt, awarded. This award, endowed with 5,000 euros, is given to prospective university professors from the field of polymer chemistry and related areas who have presented an outstanding work at the division 's workshop for junior professors. A Dr. Hermann Schnell grant for young scientists in the field of macromolecular chemistry received by Dr. Matthias Barz, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, and Dr. Bernhard Schmidt, Max Planck Institute for Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam-Golm. The awards ceremony will take place in the late afternoon of September 24th. After the award ceremony, the award winners will give an insight into their research.

The rest of the conference also offers a diverse and top-class scientific program on all aspects of polymers and their possible applications. As a special highlight, the Macromolecular Chemistry division be presenting the new position paper "Polymer Research in Germany". The 32-page brochure provides an overview of the current state of polymer science in Germany and formulates recommendations for action for the future. The position paper will be available shortly at www.gdch.de/downloads and at www.macrochem.org.

Further information on the conference at http://www.gdch.de/makro2018

The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 27 specialist groups, including the Macromolecular Chemistry division with over 1200 members. The division brings together scientists from universities, research institutes and industry from all areas of polymer chemistry and physics. The division Reimund Stadler Prize is endowed with 5,000 euros. The Macromolecular Chemistry division has the right to propose the Hermann Staudinger Prize of the GDCh, named after the 1953 Nobel Prize in Chemistry and endowed with 7,500 euros.

Brigitte Voit erhält den Hermann-Staudinger-Preis.

31 International Electrochemistry conference in Ulm

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August 30, 2018

From September 24th to 26th, Ulm University will be the venue for "Electrochemistry 2018". Under the motto "Electrochemical Surface Science: From Fundamentals to Applications", scientists and engineers from all over the world will exchange ideas about the diverse facets of Electrochemistry and the latest research results. The lectures deal with solutions for energy storage, sensors, the synthesis of chemicals, surface modification and corrosion protection. Current developments in terms of electromobility and Biotechnology in the context of Electrochemistry are also discussed. The event is organized by six scientific societies under the leadership of the Electrochemistry division of the German Chemical Society (GDCh).

On site, the division honors a young scientist with a sponsorship award. 30-year-old Dr. Simon Geiger receives the award for his dissertation ?Stability Investigations of Ir-based catalysts towards acidic water splitting?, written at the Ruhr University Bochum, in which he investigated the reaction processes on iridium-based catalysts. A precise understanding of these processes is important in order to increase the service life of fuel cells and thus their efficiency.

Further information at www.gdch.de/electrochemistry2018

The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 27 specialist groups, including the Electrochemistry division with currently 555 members. Every two years a conference takes place under the direction of the GDCh division Electrochemistry . For the sixth time, it is an international conference at which the GDCh Analytical Chemistry division , the German Bunsen Society for Physical Chemistry (DBG), the Society for Chemical Technology and Biotechnology (DECHEMA), the Working Group of Electrochemical Research Institutions (AGEF) , the Society for Corrosion Protection (GfKORR) and the German Society for Electroplating and Surface Technology (DGO).

30 Pützer Tower becomes "Historic Site of Chemistry"

Der Pützer-Turm am Darmstädter Stammsitz von Merck wird „Historische Stätte der Chemie“. (Foto: Merck/Björn Paeschke)

30/18
August 28, 2018

In the year of its 350th anniversary, the science and technology company Merck receives a special award: The German Chemical Society (GDCh) includes the Pützer Tower in Darmstadt in its ?Historic Chemistry Sites? program.

With the "Historic Sites of Chemistry" program, the GDCh has been honoring achievements of historical importance in chemistry since 1999. Places of work of important scientists are honored in a ceremonial act as places of remembrance. The aim of this program is to keep the memory of the cultural heritage of chemistry alive and to bring chemistry and its historical roots more into the public eye.

The Pützer Tower at the company's headquarters in Darmstadt is included in the program as an industrial monument. The history of today's global corporation began 350 years ago. On August 26, 1668, Friedrich Jacob Merck received from Landgrave Ludwig VI. the privilege of running the pharmacy at Schlossgraben in Darmstadt. His descendant Emanuel Merck started the large-scale production of alkaloids in the pharmacy laboratory in 1827. In 1850, together with his sons, he founded the "E. Merck Business Association". In the course of constant expansion, generous factories and representative buildings were built on today's company premises from 1901 in collaboration with the architect Friedrich Pützer. The tower, built in 1904 at the factory entrance, marked the beginning of a new era when it was built and today it represents the company's successful continuity.

The solemn unveiling of the memorial plaque on the Pützer Tower will take place following a ceremony on September 12 at Merck in Darmstadt.

The GDCh is issuing a brochure for the event, in which the history of Merck as the oldest chemical-pharmaceutical company in the world and the history of the Pützer Tower are presented. The brochure can be obtained from the GDCh (b.koehler@gdch.de).

Further information on the Internet at www.gdch.de/historischestaetten.

With around 31,000 members, the German Chemical Society is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 27 specialist groups as well as 60 local associations and regional young chemists forums. The GDCh promotes scientific work as well as the exchange and dissemination of new scientific findings. It supports the creation of networks, transdisciplinary and international cooperation and continuous education and training at school, university and at work.

29 Resource-saving chemistry

Expert group conference on Sustainable Chemistry in Aachen

29/18
23rd August 2018

How can products be manufactured or recycled in a more resource-saving way? How can chemistry be used sustainably without negatively affecting future generations? This is what the annual conference of the Sustainable Chemistry division of the German Chemical Society (GDCh) will be about from September 17th to 19th at RWTH Aachen University.

Sustainable Chemistry - that means not only avoiding toxic chemicals, reducing waste or converting production to renewable raw materials, but also considering processes holistically in terms of sustainability. Sustainable Chemistry therefore pursues not only economic but also ecological and societal goals. Products and processes are considered and calculated in advance over their entire life cycle in order to manufacture and use products as efficiently as possible. The lectures at the annual conference reflect the entire spectrum of the discipline: In addition to new catalytic processes, the focus is also on saving energy and raw materials, on current research on new energy sources and on new sustainable solutions that make chemistry suitable for all areas of life (mobility, Food, clothing, housing, etc.).

As part of the conference , the division awards a doctoral prize to Dr. Thomas Seidensticker, Technical University of Dortmund. In his excellent work he developed new homogeneous catalytic reactions from a sustainable perspective. For example, he avoided waste products and used renewable raw materials.

Further information on the conference at www.gdch.de/nachhaltig2018

The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 27 specialist groups, including the Sustainable Chemistry division founded in 2009 with over 400 members.

28 Erich Hückel Prize goes to Hans-Joachim Werner

28/18
August 21, 2018

The German Chemical Society (GDCh) awards Professor Dr. Hans-Joachim Werner, Institute for Theoretical Chemistry at the University of Stuttgart, the Erich Hückel Prize. Werner receives the award, endowed with 7,500 euros, for his outstanding achievements in theoretical chemistry. The award ceremony will take place on September 18, 2018 as part of the 54th Symposium for Theoretical Chemistry at the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg.

Werner is considered one of the most internationally renowned researchers in the field of quantum chemistry and is particularly known for his numerous methodological contributions. With his work, he has shaped Theoretical Chemistry like no other in the last few decades. In particular, the MOLPRO program package developed by him for wave function-based electronic structure calculations is used by over 500 groups worldwide. But beyond his research activities, Werner advocates the interests of theoretical chemistry. He was on the editorial board of several journals, a member of the standing committee of the German Bunsen Society for Physical Chemistry and was active on the board of the Theoretical Chemistry working group for over ten years.

After studying chemistry at Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, Werner, born in Hamburg in 1950, received his doctorate in 1977 at the Max Planck Institute for Biophysical Chemistry at Georg August University in Göttingen. In 1982 he completed his habilitation at the Goethe University in Frankfurt. After various research stays at home and abroad, he was appointed professor of Theoretical Chemistry at Bielefeld University in 1987. In 1994 he switched to a professorship for Theoretical Chemistry at the University of Stuttgart, where he is still active today.

The Erich Hückel Prize is named after the German chemist and physicist Erich Hückel (1896-1980), who is considered a pioneer in quantum chemistry. His name is the Hückel molecular orbital method (HMO theory), the Hückel rules that define the aromatic state, and the Debye-Hückel theory from Electrochemistry.

Further information on the conference at stc2018.de

The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. In addition to 27 specialist groups, seven working groups are located under its roof, including the working group Theoretical Chemistry, which is jointly supported by the German Bunsen Society for Physical Chemistry and the German Physical Society. The Theoretical Chemistry organizes annual symposia for Theoretical Chemistry.

Hans-Joachim Werner erhält den Erich-Hückel-Preis.

27 News from Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

27/18
August 16, 2018

The 40th FGMR Annual Discussion Meeting will take place from September 10th to 13th at the University of Leipzig. Also this year, the program of the annual meeting of the division Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy of the German Chemical Society (GDCh) reflects the wide range of magnetic resonance spectroscopy. During the conference , the Ernst Awards will also be presented to four young scientists. With these sponsorship awards, the division honors work by young scientists who enrich the methodological spectrum of magnetic resonance, their theoretical understanding or their application. In 2018, Katja Barth from the Goethe University in Frankfurt, Mira Schwab from the Technical University of Darmstadt, and Andreas Seegerer and Philipp Nitschke from the University of Regensburg received the award, each endowed with 500 euros. Only in Leipzig will it be announced who will be awarded the Felix Bloch Lecture. The division awards the lecture, endowed with 1000 euros, to outstanding scientists in the field of magnetic resonance for a particularly effective scientific contribution within the last five years.

Further information at www.gdch.de/nmr

The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 27 specialist groups, including the division Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy with currently 469 members. The activities of the division include the annual discussion conference with contributions from all fields of magnetic resonance, various training and information events offered by the GDCh, as well as several special events that are organized by active members on special topics.

26 In the fight against food fraud

Experts discuss consumer protection at the 47th German Food Chemists' Day

26/18
15th August 2018

From September 17th to 19th, food chemists from all over Germany will come together at the Technical University of Berlin to exchange ideas about current developments in their industry at the 47th German Food Chemists' Day. At the annual meeting of the Food Chemical Society (LChG), a division of the German Chemical Society (GDCh), consumer protection in particular plays an important role. This year, for example, the focus will be on acrylamide in vegetable chips, new methods to prove the authenticity of certain foods and how food fraud can be detected and prevented.

For some time now everyone has literally been talking about them: vegetable chips made from carrots, beetroot, parsnips or sweet potatoes. However, these snacks are not a healthier alternative to potato chips, as is often wrongly assumed. An investigation by the Chemical and Veterinary Investigation Office (CVUA) Stuttgart showed that vegetable crisps often not only contain a lot of salt and fat, but also sometimes dubious amounts of acrylamide. Acrylamide, which can be formed when starchy foods are heated, is thought to be likely to be carcinogenic in humans. In recent years, scientists at the CVUA have regularly found that vegetable chip samples exceed the previous guideline value for acrylamide in potato chips of 1000 ?g / kg - while potato chips regularly remained below the guideline value. The CVUA scientists then examined the influence of the type of vegetable and the type of preparation on the acrylamide concentration. Why sweet potatoes and carrots in particular tend to increase acrylamide formation during preparation and what the researchers still found out, explains Dr. Carmen Breitling-Utzmann from CVUA Stuttgart during the conference.

Another important task of food chemists is to be able to determine unequivocally whether particular information on quality, the type of production (organic / conventional), but also on the geographical origin of individual products applies, i.e. whether they are real, authentic foods acts. Since food is being ?counterfeited? more and more professionally, specialized analysis methods are required here. Ina Brümmer from the Department of Food Chemistry at the University of Stuttgart will present new methods that can be used to check the authenticity of tuna. Dr. Thorben Nietner from CVUA Sigmaringen shows how you can check whether real blood orange juice has been diluted with cheaper ?blonde? orange juice.

The public evening lecture on Monday, September 17th at 7:00 p.m. will also be about food fraud. Dr. Helmut Tschiersky, President of the Federal Office for Consumer Protection and Food Safety, speaks about "Food fraud - the new challenge for the future?". He also addresses the problems that arise when monitoring food, cosmetics, consumer goods and tobacco products traded on the Internet Admission to the lecture is free and interested parties are cordially invited.

More information about the conference at www.gdch.de/lchtag2018

With around 31,000 members, the GDCh is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 27 specialist groups, including the Food Chemistry Society, whose task it is to promote the exchange of ideas in the field of Food Chemistry and its related disciplines and to provide technical suggestions. With around 3000 members, the Food Chemistry Society is the largest division in the GDCh.

25 Award for application-oriented basic research

Liebig commemorative coin goes to Wolfgang Schnick

25/18
August 14, 2018

The 130th meeting of the Society of German Natural Scientists and Doctors (GDNÄ) will take place in Saarbrücken from September 14th to 17th. Traditionally, the German Chemical Society (GDCh) contributes to the event with a scientific meeting and a festive event with the award of the Liebig Memorial Medal. This year's award winner is Professor Dr. Wolfgang Schnick from the Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich.

The GDCh honors Schnick's pioneering work in the synthesis of inorganic materials with p-block elements. With his research, the creative and exceptional scientist has set new standards in the field of fluorescent technologies. His research results led, among other things, to the main components for warm white high-performance LEDs and LED light sources in the automotive industry.

Schnick, born in Hanover in 1957, completed his chemistry studies at the University of Hanover in 1986 with a doctorate. After his habilitation in inorganic chemistry at the University of Bonn, he took up a professorship for Inorganic Chemistry at the University of Bayreuth in 1993. Schnick has been Professor of Inorganic Solid State Chemistry at the Ludwig Maximilians University in Munich since 1998. His research focuses on inorganic Solid-State Chemistry and Materials Research. He develops complex nitrides of main group elements such as carbon, silicon or phosphorus, in combination with alkali and alkaline earth metals, rare earth metals and / or hydrogen. For his fundamental scientific achievements, Schnick was awarded the Otto Klung Prize of the Free University of Berlin, the Gottfried Wilhelm Leibniz Prize of the German Research Foundation (DFG) and the Wilhelm Klemm Prize of the GDCh, among others. In addition, he was elected to both the Berlin-Brandenburg Academy of Sciences and the German Academy of Sciences Leopoldina.

The award ceremony will take place on September 17th as part of the GDCh festive meeting, which will be held by GDCh President Dr. Matthias Urmann is opened. After the award ceremony, the winner will speak about "Exploratory basic research and industrial application - contradiction or desirable consequence?".

The German Chemical Society , with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It awards numerous internationally renowned prizes, including the Liebig commemorative coin, which was first awarded in 1903. Among the 68 winners so far are numerous later Nobel Prize winners: Adolf von Baeyer, Paul Ehrlich, Fritz Haber, Carl Bosch, Max Planck, Friedrich Bergius, Hans Fischer, Feodor Lynen, Karl Ziegler and Gerhard Ertl.

Wolfgang Schnick erhält die Liebig-Denkmünze

24 Digitization in the chemical industry

Paint chemists discuss current developments in Bayreuth

24/18
August 9, 2018

From September 12th to 14th, the paint Coating Chemistry division of the German Chemical Society (GDCh) invites you to the 82nd paint conference in Bayreuth. Under the motto "4.0 - Everything in the paint?", This year the focus is not only on additives, pigments and application-oriented analysis methods, but also on digitization and how it affects Coating Chemistry .

In Coating Chemistry , too, digitization has long been indispensable. Digital technologies increase competitive dynamics through efficient use of resources, but at the same time place high demands on agility, specific know-how and adjustments to established processes. In addition to these challenges, it also brings new opportunities, especially for the medium-sized paint industry. Companies that get involved in modern digitization solutions can expand their business areas by increasing their efficiency and thus achieve competitive advantages. Benjamin Mühleck from Karl Wörwag Lack- und Farbenfabrik in Stuttgart presents an example of the digital transformation in the medium-sized paint industry.

How digitization is changing jobs is the topic of the lecture "Professions 4.0" by Dr. Wolfram Keller, Wolfram Keller Management Consulting. He presents the results of an empirical survey by the GDCh- division Association for Chemistry and Economics. More than 1000 participants, including almost 750 chemists, answered questions about digitization and the future requirements for skilled workers. The survey showed, among other things, that Industry 4.0 not only requires extensive automation and digitization but also ?Expert 4.0?. Only those specialists who understand customer requirements and applications can develop and manufacture recipes, enable machines and systems to produce, and ensure the supply of raw materials and technical requirements.

The classic topics of the conference offer visitors top-class input and the opportunity for an intensive professional exchange. At the end of the conference , the two best presentations at the conference be awarded the conference prizes of the Coating Chemistry division . As part of this year's conference , a poster session will also take place for the first time. And in the run-up to the event, there will be a Summer School for paint Coating Chemistry students in Bayreuth from September 11th to 12th.

More information about the conference at www.gdch.de/lacktagung2018.

The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 27 specialist groups, including the paint Coating Chemistry division with almost 500 members. The division sees its tasks in the active promotion of science and research in the field of coating materials and pigments and associated raw materials, products and technologies as well as in the cooperation in technical and political issues of European and German legislation.

23 "Chemistry is sustainable!"

Chemistry teachers and didactics meet in Karlsruhe

23/18
7th August 2018

From 13 to 15 September the 35th advanced training and lecture conference of the Division of Chemical Education (FGCU) take place at the Karlsruhe University of Education. Under the motto "Chemistry is sustainable!", The division of the German Chemical Society (GDCh) has put together an attractive program of plenary lectures, workshops, experimental and discussion lectures as well as a poster session. As part of the conference , the FGCU also awards prizes to teachers and didacticians.

The conference focuses on application-related topics and how these can be implemented in Chemical Education . While new concepts for Chemical Education and student laboratories are presented in the discussion lectures, the experimental lectures show in concrete terms what the practical application can look like. According to this year's motto, the focus is particularly on sustainability: In addition to the limits of electrochemical energy storage, it is also about how green chemistry, phosphate recovery and the extraction, application and recycling of rare earth elements can be integrated into the classroom. In numerous workshops, which were developed in cooperation with experts from the GDCh teacher training centers and other experts, participants receive material for modern Chemical Education. During the conference , the FCGU also awards four prizes to particularly committed teachers and didactics.

Axel Franke from the Robert Koch School in Clausthal-Zellerfeld receives the Friedrich Stromeyer Prize endowed with 3000 euros. The prize for promoting chemistry classes is donated by Merck, Darmstadt. Franke receives the award for almost 40 years of commitment to modern Chemical Education. During this time Franke not only succeeded in inspiring countless schoolchildren for chemistry, but also in building a bridge between chemistry and society through his voluntary activities.

The Heinrich Roessler Prize, endowed with 4,000 euros and a medal, donated by Degussa AG, today Evonik Industries AG, Essen, was awarded to Dr. Franz Kappenberg. The award winner has been promoting the use of computers in Chemical Education since 1979 and has been developing free software for all areas of school chemistry since then. Even after his retirement, Kappenberg continues to be involved and actively supports teachers in digitization.

The Manfred and Wolfgang Flad Prize, also endowed with 4,000 euros, is donated by the Institute Dr. Flad, is awarded for particularly successful experimental presentations. This year, the award goes to Dominik Quarthal and Jana Novotny from the Freiburg University of Education for their lecture on ?Perspectives on Sustainable Energy Supply - Selected Organic and Inorganic Redox Flow Batteries for Schools and Universities? at the GDCh Science Forum 2017 in Berlin .

Carola Harms from the elementary school on the edge of the forest in Schwedt receives the prize, endowed with 1000 euros, for teachers at primary schools. The award, donated by Merck, Darmstadt, is given to elementary school teachers for strengthening chemistry in subject teaching.

Further information at www.gdch.de/fgcu2018.

The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. She has 27 professional groups, including the division of Chemical Education with about 1,900 members. Chemistry teacher, high school teacher and chemists from industry and the public sector have joined forces in the division of Chemical Education a competent forum for all issues that affect the chemistry in teaching, teaching, training and further education.

On the occasion of the conference , the Karlsruhe University of Education invites media representatives to a press conference on September 13, 2018 at 11:15 a.m. Further information can be found in the invitation.

22 ORCHEM 2018 in Berlin

Thorsten Bach receives Emil Fischer Medal

22/18
2nd August 2018

The 21st ORCHEM will take place from September 10th to 12th at the Technical University of Berlin. The conference is one based on the current topics and high-profile speakers at scientists from academia and industry to the most attractive conferences in the field of organic chemistry. Around 400 visitors are expected. The program includes lectures on synthesis, catalysis, methodology and reactivity. The conference chaired by Professor Dr. Martin Oestreich, TU Berlin, and Professor Dr. Stefan Hecht, HU Berlin, is organized by the Liebig Association for Organic Chemistry of the German Chemical Society (GDCh). As part of ORCHEM, outstanding chemists are also honored for their research.

On September 10th, the GDCh will award the Emil Fischer Medal to Professor Dr. Thorsten Bach, Technical University of Munich. Bach receives the award, endowed with 7,500 euros, for the development and application of new synthetic methods, primarily through catalytic, thermal and photochemical processes. With his work, the award winner makes significant contributions to the development of new organic chemistry. Following the award ceremony, Bach will give an insight into his research.

Thorsten Bach, born in Ludwigshafen am Rhein in 1965, studied chemistry at the Ruprecht-Karls-Universität Heidelberg and the University of Southern California, Los Angeles, USA. After graduating with distinction, he did his doctorate in 1991 - also with distinction - at the Philipps University in Marburg. After a post-doc at Harvard University in Cambridge, USA, he completed his habilitation at the Westphalian Wilhelms University in Münster. In 1997, Bach was appointed university professor at the Philipps University in Marburg, and in 2000 he was appointed to the Technical University of Munich. Bach is a member of the Leopoldina, the National Academy of Sciences and the Bavarian Academy of Sciences, and has already received numerous awards for his research.

Also on September 10th, the Liebig Association for Organic Chemistry will award the ORCHEM Prize, endowed with 5,000 euros, to the young scientist Junior Professor Dr. Ivana Fleischer, University of Tübingen, and private lecturer Dr. Florian Beuerle, University of Würzburg. The prize is awarded regularly as part of ORCHEM to younger scientists who have qualified through new, original and pioneering scientific work in the field. After the award ceremony, both winners will give a brief insight into their research.

Further information on the conference at: www.gdch.de/orchem2018

The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 27 specialist groups, including the Liebig Association for Organic Chemistry with around 1400 members. The main concerns of the Liebig Association for Organic Chemistry are, among other things, to stimulate research directions and research projects in the field of organic chemistry, to provide information about essential activities in this field and to make important and current aspects of organic chemistry known through intensive public relations work.

Thorsten Bach erhält die Emil-Fischer-Medaille (Foto: Lukas Fritz)

21 26th Lecture Conference on Photochemistry 2018

Award for outstanding science in Munich

21/18
July 31, 2018

From September 10th to 12th, the Photochemistry division of the German Chemical Society (GDCh) invites you to the Technical University of Munich in Garching. The program of the 26th Lecture Conference on Photochemistry includes not only scientific lectures but also an important award ceremony.

Leading international and national scientists meet in Garching to present and discuss the latest results on current topics in photochemical and photophysical research. The speakers include the Nobel laureate in chemistry, Professor Dr. Ben L. Feringa, University of Groningen (NL), Professor Dr. Tanja Weil, Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Mainz, Professor Dr. David WC MacMillan, Princeton University (USA) and Professor Dr. Dirk Trauner, New York University (USA). Thematically, the conference covers the entire spectrum of photochemical research: In addition to photochemical switches, the program includes the Photochemistry of new materials, optogenetics, photopharmacology, single molecule spectroscopy, synthetic organic Photochemistry and photoredox catalysis as well as technologically and industrially relevant processes. Today, Photochemistry has a key function in many areas of our society, as many modern technologies would not exist without this interdisciplinary field of science.

On September 11th, Professor Dr. Michael Grätzel, EPF Lausanne, Switzerland, awarded the Theodor Förster Memorial Lecture. The Photochemistry division and the German Bunsen Society (DBG), who jointly award the prize, are honoring his outstanding work in the field of Photochemistry. The photovoltaic pioneer has made a name for itself with the development of a new type of solar cell (?Grätzel cells?). As early as August, the GDCh awarded him the August Wilhelm von Hofmann medal for his services to chemistry.

Further information at www.gdch.de/photo2018.

The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 27 specialist groups, including the Photochemistry division with currently 342 members. Her goals in the field of Photochemistry and its border areas are to promote the exchange of ideas among specialist colleagues and to convey technical suggestions, to maintain relationships with relevant organizations abroad, to anchor or strengthen subject-related teaching at universities and to encourage young scientists to promote.

20 Recognizing underestimated dangers

Annual meeting of Chemists in Civil Service

20/18
July 26, 2018

Whether it's dust at the workplace or carbon monoxide when grilling - hidden dangers can be found in a wide variety of areas of life. If they remain undetected, they can even become life-threatening. The Chemists in Civil Service, a division of the German Chemical Society (GDCh), get to the bottom of these underestimated dangers at their annual meeting on September 4 and 5, 2018 at the trade association for the construction industry (BG Bau) in Frankfurt am Main.

Chemists from various fields of activity have come together in the division . The members work, among other things, in federal environmental authorities or in the fire brigade, work in laboratories, provide advice or do research. The lecture program at their annual meeting is correspondingly varied.

Dr. Frank Scheufler from the Forensic Institute at the Bavarian State Criminal Police Office. The increasing number of drug offenses as well as new psychoactive substances play an important role. These relatively easily available drugs pose an incalculable risk to health and life, as they often have unpredictable effects.

The lecture by Dr. Sebastian Foraita from the Frankfurt fire brigade. Carbon monoxide is dangerous because it is odorless and invisible. As a result, the danger of the gas is often not recognized or recognized too late. Causes of carbon monoxide poisoning can, for example, be clogged chimneys or barbecuing in closed rooms.

Underestimated dangers can also hide in the workplace, as Dr. Rolf Packroff from the Federal Institute for Occupational Safety and Health will present. Despite the ban on asbestos and the obligation to take measures to reduce dust, inhaling dust in the workplace is still one of the main causes of occupational respiratory diseases. Therefore, when it comes to innovative materials, particular attention must be paid to an application-safe design.

Other lectures will deal with the unexpected risks associated with scientific projects and the dangers of oximes in paints and sealants. The experts show how hazards can be recognized and what chemists in particular can do to avoid them.

Further information can be found at www.gdch.de/oedi.

The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 27 specialist groups, including the division Chemists in Civil Service. Its currently 233 members are committed to the specific promotion of the scientific / professional interests of chemists in the public service and use their expertise and influence in the sense of the tasks of the GDCh (e.g. in occupational, environmental and consumer protection).

19 New statistics for chemistry courses published

More undergraduate and graduate students

19/18
3rd July 2018

In 2017, more people decided to study chemistry again. And the number of doctoral students also reached a new high. This is reported by the German Chemical Society (GDCh) in its annual statistics for chemistry courses. Most of the students go through the classic career path and also complete the master?s degree after completing their Bachelor?s degree. Most university graduates go on to do a doctorate. It was a little easier for graduates to enter professional life in 2017 than in previous years.

The GDCh has been collecting extensive statistical data on chemistry courses every year since 1952. The 2017 statistics are based on data from the bachelor's and master's degree programs in chemistry / business chemistry, Biochemistry/ life sciences and their individual diploma programs. Food Chemistry and chemistry courses at universities of applied sciences (HAW) were also taken into account. In addition to the number of beginners and students, the number of final exams passed as well as the respective grades and duration of study were recorded. Information on starting a career after completing a bachelor's, master's and doctoral degree was also requested.

In 2017, a total of 11,339 beginners began a chemistry degree. The universities reported 2,486 Bachelor's and 2,444 Master's graduates in chemistry / business chemistry. The median duration of study was 6.6 semesters for a bachelor's degree and 4.6 semesters for a master?s degree. 2019 people graduated in chemistry in 2017. The median duration of the doctorate was 8.0 semesters. In Biochemistry and life sciences, 867 Bachelor and 828 Master graduates were registered, plus 251 doctorates. At 6.4 semesters for the bachelor's degree and 4.5 semesters for the master's degree, the duration of the course was slightly shorter than in the chemistry course. The median duration of the doctorate was, at 8.7 semesters, significantly longer than in previous years.

925 students completed their bachelor's and 482's master's degree at HAW. In Food Chemistry , 220 people passed the main examination A or the diploma examination. 169 students passed the main examination part B. In addition, the universities reported 150 Bachelor and 93 Master degrees and 55 doctorates.

Almost all Bachelor graduates at universities and 70% at universities of applied sciences (HAW) followed up with a Master?s degree. Around 86% of the master?s graduates at universities and 12% of the master?s graduates at the HAW started a doctorate. The number of PhD students in chemistry will reach its highest level on record this year. The number of doctorates also remains at the highest level.

60% of graduates with a doctorate in chemistry are aware of the first step into professional life. Accordingly, entry into the labor market was slightly easier for young professionals in 2017 than in the previous year. According to the universities, 35% of the newly graduated chemists were hired in the chemical and pharmaceutical industry, 11% took up a position in the rest of the economy. 12% initially went abroad after completing their doctorate, in most cases for a postdoc stay. 20% started in an initially temporary position in Germany (including postdocs). 4% percent found employment in other areas of the public service. 11% were temporarily looking for a job (2016: 14.5%) - also due to the time of the survey.

The brochure ?Statistics of Chemistry Courses 2017 - A GDCh Survey on Chemistry Courses at Universities and Colleges in Germany? is available free of charge as a PDF at www.gdch.de/statistik.

The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. Among other things, she deals with current developments at universities and on the labor market. The GDCh determines annually (reference date: December 31st) information on the number of students in the various study sections, the exams taken and the length of study. The information is provided to the GDCh by the chemistry departments of the universities.

Images for download:

Abbildung 1: Studiengang Chemie: Studienanfänger/innen (ohne Studiengänge Biochemie, Lebensmittelchemie und HAW)
Abbildung 2: Studiengang Chemie: Promotionen (ohne Studiengänge Biochemie, Lebensmittelchemie und HAW)
Abbildung 3: Studiengang Chemie: Verbleib der 2017 promovierten Chemiker/innen (ohne Studiengänge Biochemie, Lebensmittelchemie und HAW)
 

18 gold for a photovoltaic pioneer

GDCh awards Michael Grätzel with the August Wilhelm von Hofmann memorial coin

18/18
June 6, 2018

The German Chemical Society (GDCh) honors Professor Dr. Michael Grätzel, École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne, CH, with the August Wilhelm von Hofmann medal. The chemist receives the gold coin for his special services to chemistry: the photovoltaic pioneer developed the "Grätzel cell" named after him - a dye solar cell that successfully mimics natural photosynthesis. The award will take place on August 30th during the 7th EuCheMS Chemistry Congress in Liverpool, UK.

Grätzel did pioneering research into electron and energy transfer reactions. Among other things, he developed the dye-sensitized solar cell (DSSC) - the "Grätzel cell" - which uses organic dyes, for example the leaf pigment chlorophyll, to absorb light. With this revolutionary approach, he successfully mimicked the photovoltaic conversion process of natural photosynthesis. For example, dye-sensitized solar cells can serve as lightweight flexible cells for powering portable electronic devices.

Michael Graetzel was born in Dorfchemnitz in Saxony in 1944 and studied chemistry at the Free University of Berlin. He received his doctorate in 1971 from the Technical University of Berlin and completed his habilitation in physical chemistry at the Free University of Berlin in 1976. In 1977 he took up a position as Associated Professor of Physical Chemistry at the École polytechnique fédérale de Lausanne (EPFL) until he was appointed Professor and Director of the Laboratory of Photonics and Interfaces at EPFL in 1981. Grätzel, one of the most cited chemists in the world, has already received numerous prizes and awards for his work.

The GDCh will award Michael Graetzel the August Wilhelm von Hofmann medal at this year's congress of the European Association for Chemical and Molecular Sciences (EuCheMS) in Liverpool from August 26th to 30th, 2018. August, the award winner gives insights into his research in his plenary lecture ?Molecular Photovoltaics and Perovskite Solar Cells?.

The European Association for Chemical and Molecular Sciences is the successor organization to the FECS (Federation of European Chemical Societies), which was founded in 1970 with the major contribution of the GDCh. EuCheMS has more than 40 chemical science societies in 33 countries as members, including the GDCh as the largest continental European chemical society with around 31,000 members - around 20 percent of the chemists represented by EuCheMS. The scientific activities of EuCheMS are mainly carried out through the relevant divisions and working parties. The focus is on the EuCheMS Chemistry Congress, which takes place every two years.

Michael Grätzel erhält die August-Wilhelm-von-Hofmann-Denkmünze der GDCh

17 chemists condemn the use of poison gas in Syria

17/18
17th May 2018

After the OVCW confirmed the renewed use of poison gas in Syria in February 2018, the German Chemical Society eV (GDCh) sharply condemned the use. "We are appalled that people are being murdered or injured again and again with chemical warfare agents," says Dr. Matthias Urmann, President of the GDCh. The Fact Finding Mission (FFM) of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OVCW) confirmed on May 15 that there was a high probability that the toxic gas chlorine was used in the attack on February 4, 2018 in the Syrian city of Saraqib, Idlib province . The chemical societies of Europe, including the GDCh, reaffirm their commitment to the ?Seville Declaration?, which was made in 2016. The declaration, which was signed by 36 chemical societies in Europe, states: ?We, the member societies of the European Association for Chemical and Molecular Sciences (EuCheMS), condemn the use of chlorine in Syria and other parts of the world and demand the international one Community to bring those responsible for the misuse of chlorine to justice. "As early as 1998, the GDCh included a code of conduct in its statutes , which is binding for every member. In it, the members position themselves clearly against the misuse of chemicals, for example for production In addition, the GDCh is also an international partner of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OVCW) campaigns against chemical weapons. The original Seville Declaration is available at www.euchems.eu/seville-declaration-use-chlorine- warfare available. With around 31,000 members, the German Chemical Society is one of the largest che scientific societies worldwide. It has 27 specialist groups as well as 60 local associations and regional young chemists forums. The GDCh promotes scientific work as well as the exchange and dissemination of new scientific findings. It supports the creation of networks, transdisciplinary and international cooperation and continuous education and training at school, university and at work. The European Association for Chemical and Molecular Sciences (EuCheMS) brings together over 40 chemical science societies in 33 countries. It is based in Brussels.

GDCh-Präsident Dr. Matthias Urmann

16 Paul Bunge Prize goes to Anthony John Turner

16/18
May 3, 2018

The historian and expert on ancient scientific instruments Anthony John Turner, Le Mesnil-le-Roi, France, receives the Paul-Bunge-Preis 2018. The award ceremony will take place on May 10th during the 117th Annual General Meeting of the German Bunsen Society for Physical Chemistry - the Bunsentagung 2018 - at the Leibniz University Hannover. The prize of the Hans-R.-Jenemann-Stiftung is endowed with 7,500 euros and is awarded jointly by the German Chemical Society (GDCh) and the German Bunsen Society (DBG). It honors outstanding work on the history of scientific instruments. Turner receives the Paul Bunge Prize for his life's work in the history of instruments. He did pioneering work in the beginnings of modern instrument history and wrote outstanding publications such as ?Early Scientific Instruments? and ?Après Gassendi?. For over 40 years, Turner has devoted himself in over 200 publications to astronomical and mathematical-physical instruments, their use, cultural significance and the European instrument trade. His next work has been announced for this year: ?Mathematical Instruments in the collections of the Bibliothèque Nationale de France?. Turner gives an insight into his life's work in the award-winning lecture 'Encounters with alchemists, balances and others ...' on May 11th at 2:40 pm. Born in Newbury Park, UK, in 1946, Turner first studied history at Wadham College Oxford, UK, and then devoted himself to the history of science. He has been running an antiquarian bookshop for the history of science and technology in Le Mesnil-le-Roi in France for many decades. In addition, he works as a freelance expert for auction houses and curator of exhibitions. The Paul Bunge Prize is considered the most important honor in the field of the history of scientific instruments worldwide and is advertised publicly and internationally. In addition to German scholars, it has also gone to British, Italian, US, Australian and Canadian scientists. The Foundation's Advisory Board, supported by the GDCh and the DBG, decides on the award. Hans R. Jenemann (1920?1996), chemist at Schott Glaswerke in Mainz, became known for his contributions to the history of scientific devices, especially historical scales. He himself set up the foundation in 1992. The award is named after the Hamburg precision mechanic Paul Bunge (1839?1888), one of the leading designers of laboratory balances for chemical analysis. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It maintains numerous foundations, such as the Hans R. Jenemann Foundation. The Paul-Bunge-Preis of the Hans-R.-Jenemann-Stiftung is awarded annually, alternately at DBG general meetings and lecture conferences of the GDCh division on the History of Chemistry.

Paul-Bunge-Preisträger Anthony John Turner (Foto: privat)

15 About cruises, water and chemistry

conference "Water 2018" with a public evening lecture and award ceremonies

15/18
April 10, 2018

The conference "Water 2018" will take place in Papenburg from May 7th to 9th. The organizer is the Water Chemistry Society, a division of the German Chemical Society (GDCh). Around 300 chemists come together in the ?Venice of the North? to discuss current issues relating to water. In addition to the scientific program, four prizes are also awarded: the Willy Hager Prize, two doctoral prizes and the division badge of honor. On the first evening of the conference, a public evening lecture will address the environmental impact of cruise ships. In Papenburg, the water chemists deal with current research on wastewater, drinking water, nanoparticles and microplastics, water treatment and trace substances. But topics with a regional reference are also on the agenda. In addition to lectures on marine chemistry, this year there will also be the special topic ?River Basin Management Ems?. Because the transfer of the imposing cruise ships, which are built in the local Meyer Werft, attracts numerous onlookers every time. The complex processes in the background as well as measures to improve the ecological status of the lower Ems will be the subject of the session. Fritz Hertel from the Federal Environment Agency will present the environmental impact of cruise ships in a public evening lecture on May 7th. Because what passengers often don't see: cruise ships can have a significant impact on the environment. In addition to emissions such as carbon dioxide, nitrogen oxides and soot particles, the issue is, among other things, water pollution and the disturbance of marine mammals by ship noise. Using ship-based tourism with so-called expedition cruise ships in the polar regions, Hertel shows what is being done to minimize such environmental impacts and what needs to be done further. Admission to the evening lecture is free for all interested parties, even if they are not participating in the conference . The lecture will take place at 7:45 pm in room 1 of the ?Alte Werft? hotel. During the opening event on May 7th, Dr.-Ing. Eduard Rott, University of Stuttgart, received the Willy Hager Prize of the same name, endowed with 6,000 euros, for his work "Investigations into the elimination of phosphorus from industrial wastewater containing phosphonates". Dr. Kevin was awarded a doctoral prize - sponsored by the Walter Kölle Foundation Jewell, Federal Institute for Hydrology, Koblenz, and Dr. Stefan Bieber, Technical University of Munich, won the jury with his research on transformation processes during biological wastewater treatment, Bieber with his work on international management strategies for organic trace substances in water. Finally, Kurt Böhm, Head of accounting of the GDCh headquarters, for his commitment and the very successful support of the water chemical society, the badge of honor of the division. the program and further information on the conference under www.gdch.de/wasser2018 heard the German Chemical Society (GDCh) with approximately 31,000 members of the largest chemical science societies worldwide. It founded 27 specialist groups, including the Water Chemistry Society, in 1926 as the "division for Water chemistry" in the Association of German Chemists. In 1948 it was re-established as the "division Water chemistry" in the GDCh, since 2000 it has been called "Water Chemistry Society - division in der GDCh". Its more than 950 members are committed to effective protection, sensible use, appropriate treatment and purification as well as the proper examination and assessment of the water. More information at: www.wasserchemische-gesellschaft.de.

14 Analytics in consumer protection

Labeling and safety aspects are topics of the analytica conference 2018

14/18
5th April 2018

The analytica conference begins on Tuesday in Munich. From April 10 to 12, 2018, experts will report on a practical basis from their specialist areas - for example on the analytical challenges in the implementation of consumer-oriented legislation. In addition to technical issues, the focus is always on consumer protection and consumer information. The scientific program of the analytica conference is organized by the Analytik Forum, consisting of the German Chemical Society (GDCh), the Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (GBM) and the German Society for Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (DGKL). Analysts have a social responsibility towards consumers. With their daily work they make a valuable contribution to consumer protection. For a high analytical level, standardized analysis methods and reference materials as well as smooth cooperation between all parties are important. In the session "Analytical Challenges from Implementing Consumer-Oriented Legislation" on April 11th, experts from Germany and abroad will show how such challenges can be mastered successfully. The experts provide an insight into the special challenges in their areas of expertise The analysis of micropollutants in water are Nanomaterials in food, safety aspects of toys and the labeling of genetically modified organisms and allergens are topics of the individual lectures. In addition to the exciting technical questions, the responsibility of the scientists for their "products" always plays a role. Because in addition to pure analytics, they also take on the task of conveying the meaning and significance of their data to consumers so that they can correctly assess a possible risk. The analytica conference accompanies the 26th analytica, the leading international trade fair for laboratory technology, analysis and Biotechnology from April 10th to 13th, 2018 in Munich. The conference will take place in the ICM - International Congress Center Munich, on the Munich exhibition grounds. Other sessions deal with the use of analytical methods in Food Chemistry and Toxicology as well as the handling of big data. Admission is free for visitors to analytica. The joint stand of the Analytik Forum is located in Hall B2, No. 504. The current program for the analytica conference can be found at www.gdch.de/analyticaconf2018 or in thedates database atwww.analytica.de/conference. Contact for the press: analytica conference analytica
Dr. Karin J. Schmitz Barbara Kals
German Chemical Society, Munich Trade Fair
public relation PR manager
Tel .: +49 69 7917-493 Tel .: +49 89 949-21473
Email: pr@gdch.de Email: barbara.kals@messe-muenchen.de

13 GDCh cooperates with ACS and RSC in the development of the preprint server ChemRxiv

13/18
4th April 2018

The American Chemical Society (ACS), the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) and the German Chemical Society (GDCh) are entering into a cooperation to advance the financial and strategic development of ChemRxiv, the preprint server for the global chemical community. Thanks to this strategic partnership between three of the largest chemical science societies, scientists will in future be able to disseminate their research results quickly in a forum that is freely accessible worldwide. The cooperation between ACS, RSC and GDCh ensures the sustainability of this service. "At ACS, we are pleased to have officially partnered with two of the world's leading scientific societies," said Dr. James Milne, Senior Vice President, ACS Journals Publishing Group. "In a rapidly developing scientific landscape, preprints are an essential step in the research process. which creates transparency and enables the rapid worldwide dissemination of new knowledge. Through this partnership, ChemRxiv is operated by chemical societies that have long been recognized as representatives of the broad international community that we serve. ?Authors from all areas of chemistry can share their thoughts In future, results will be published before the formal peer review process and subsequent publication on the server. The free service offers a streamlined portal for direct and easy submission and supports a wide range of file formats. New functions include a triage process that enables the entered documents received are checked for plagiarism and other basic elements, while maintaining the fast turnaround time of less than two working days. In the coming months ChemRxiv will also offer a ?Direct to Journal? transfer function so that authors can send their preprint directly from ChemRxiv to the journal of their choice. "The scientific publication landscape is changing considerably right now," says GDCh managing director Wolfram Koch. ?It is therefore important that the GDCh join forces with ACS and RSC to fulfill our joint mission of serving the chemical community worldwide and supporting the dissemination of chemical knowledge.? ?The introduction of ChemRxiv is a fantastic opportunity, our worldwide To provide chemistry community with new tools to share and discover research, ?says Emma Wilson, PhD, Director of Publishing, RSC. "It is an important service for researchers, and the partnership of three major chemical societies ensures that our international community is at the heart of ChemRxiv." For more information on ChemRxiv, please visit the website at chemrxiv.org . About the German Chemical Society (GDCh) With around 31,000 members, the GDCh is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 27 specialist groups as well as 60 local associations and regional young chemists forums. The GDCh promotes scientific work as well as the exchange and dissemination of new scientific findings. It supports the creation of networks, transdisciplinary and international cooperation and continuous education and training at school, university and at work. About the American Chemical Society (ACS) The American Chemical Society, the largest scientific society in the world, is a not-for-profit organization founded by the United States Congress. The ACS is a leading global provider of chemistry-related information and research through its numerous databases, peer-reviewed journals and scientific conferences. The company's main offices are in Washington, DC and Columbus, Ohio. About the Royal Society of Chemistry (RSC) The Royal Society of Chemistry promotes excellence in the chemical sciences. With over 50,000 members and a global knowledge business, the RSC is the professional association for chemists in Great Britain; a non-profit organization with 175 years of history and an international vision for the future. The Royal Society of Chemistry promotes, supports and celebrates chemistry and shapes the future of chemical sciences - for the benefit of science and humanity.

12 About doping, artificial organs and Goethe's secret lover

Annual meeting of Senior Expert Chemists in Weimar

12/18
3rd April 2018

Can artificial photosynthesis meet future energy needs? What new methods are there to prove doping in sport? And can we soon replace diseased bodies in the human body with other materials? These and other questions will be discussed at the 7th annual meeting of the Senior Expert Chemists (SEC), a division of the German Chemical Society (GDCh). The conference will take place from May 2nd to 4th in Weimar. Tomorrow, April 4th, will be the day of the older generation. But the SEC members have more important things to do than think about their age. ?We are not couch potatoes, no TV gawkers, and certainly not disinterested in politics, science and culture. We are active, cosmopolitan and still in love with the natural sciences, especially chemistry and Pharmacy, ?emphasizes Professor Dr. Klaus-Peter Jäckel, CEO of the SEC. For the seventh time, the Senior Expert Chemists a conference that deals with current topics from all areas of chemistry. The speakers include Professor Dr. Dagmar Schipanski, University of Ilmenau, and Prof. Dr. Dr. Eh Markus Antonietti, Max Planck Institute for Colloids and Interfaces, Potsdam. Greetings will be given by Stefan Wolf, Lord Mayor of Weimar, and the GDCh President Dr. Matthias Urmann. Around 200 visitors are expected to attend the event, which is sponsored by the Federal Ministry for Families, Seniors, Women and Youth (BMFSFJ). In his lecture, Markus Antonietti will examine what artificial photosynthesis and other methods copied from nature can do for future energy generation. Professor Dr. Mario Thevis from the Center for Preventive Doping Research at the German Sport University Cologne presents ways of detecting doping-relevant substances in youth and senior sport. And Professor Dr. Thomas Scheper from the Institute for Technical Chemistry at the University of Hanover gives an overview of current research in biomedicine. Here, scientists are working on applying the body's own cells to materials in such a way that artificial heart valves, veins or even bodies are not rejected by the body. "Artificial bodies from the test tube - solutions for an aging society" is the title of his lecture. Culture is not neglected either: The connection between Johann Wolfgang von Goethe and the natural sciences, especially chemistry (?his secret lover?) will be highlighted in an evening lecture. And building bridges with the younger generation is particularly important to the senior experts. Not only will some young chemists, i.e. students and doctoral students, be there in Weimar, but also Thuringian students from advanced natural science courses with a special interest in chemistry. Further information on the conference can be found at www.gdch.de/sec2018. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with around 31,000 members. It maintains 27 specialist groups, including the Senior Expert Chemists (SEC) with over 300 members. Most senior experts have a university education and have been active in responsible positions in industrial companies, educational institutions (e.g. universities and schools), research institutes or authorities during their professional life. Today they volunteer in three SEC working groups ?Network?, ?Public Relations? and ?School-Education-Profession?.

Mesenchymale Stammzellen unter dem Fluoreszenzmikroskop. Diese Zellen können gezielt in Knochen-, Knorpel- oder Muskelzellen entwickelt werden. (Foto: Institut für Technische Chemie, Universität Hannover).

11 Science bridges cultures - Call for the March for Science on April 14th

Joint call for five scientific and mathematical societies to participate in the upcoming March for Science

11/18
March 21, 2018

The second March for Science will take place on April 14, 2018. In many cities in Germany, thousands of people - not just scientists - will take to the streets to demonstrate for science. In addition to many banners, you will notice the words " Science Bridges Cultures " here and there on badges. Under this motto, five scientific societies have called their more than 130,000 members to participate: The Umbrella Association of Geosciences (DVGeo), the German Mathematicians Association (DMV), the German Physical Society (DPG), the German Chemical Society (GDCh) and The Association of Biology, Biosciences and Biomedicine in Germany (VBIO) is supporting the March for Science 2018. The major mathematical and scientific societies want to set a common sign that exact and careful science is essential for a modern society and not bent for populist theses may be. The freedom of research and teaching and the freedom of expression must be preserved. Scientific facts must not be denied, relativized or compared with ?alternative facts? as being of equal value. If findings such as man-made climate change are played down and initiatives against global warming are discontinued or scaled back, then this threatens the lives of millions of people in the medium term.

Professor Rolf-Dieter Heuer, President of the German Physical Society, emphasizes: ? Physics is the prime example of an empirical science that always confirms theories on the basis of experiments, modifies them if necessary or recognizes them as false and shelves them. For this classification, a free and rationally argued scientific discourse is required ?. "Scientific facts form the essential basis for the political and social debate," says Professor Bernd Müller-Röber, President of the Association for Biology, Biosciences and Biomedicine in Germany. "We oppose all efforts to replace evidence-based statements with 'alternative facts'". Science is international and thrives on cooperation across borders. It follows that the free exchange between scientists of all nationalities must not be restricted. "The VBIO criticizes all approaches to restrict the freedom of research and teaching and to hinder the free, cross-national exchange between scientists," said VBIO President Müller-Röber. And Professor Martin Meschede, President of the Geosciences Umbrella Association, emphasizes: ?The geosciences are a priori unlimited science. Geoscientific facts are not tied to national borders. A free and independent exchange of scientific knowledge is imperative for every geoscientist ?. A sign for science DMV President Professor Michael Röckner says: ?It is important for the German Mathematicians Association to take a decisive stand against the falsification of scientific truth. We advocate the unlimited exchange of scientific ideas. All actors must be able to research and travel freely. ?If the findings of research and science are only presented as one possible opinion of many, they lose their meaning and science is ultimately deprived of its right to exist. Scientific truth must always remain the measure of all things, even and especially when it is uncomfortable. Dr. Matthias Urmann, President of the German Chemical Society, points out the self-commitment of chemists. ?The code of conduct, which is part of our statutes , obliges every member to stand up for freedom, tolerance and truthfulness in science. We are committed to the truth in the development, application and dissemination of chemical knowledge. We must therefore not accept it when scientific findings are denied or replaced by 'alternative facts'. "Scientific facts as the basis of social discourse are non-negotiable! Information on the societies: Umbrella Association of Geosciences (DVGeo)
German Mathematicians Association (DMV)
German Physical Society (DPG)
German Chemical Society (GDCh)
Association of Biology, Biosciences and Biomedicine in Germany (VBIO) The website www.wissenschaft-verbindet.de provides information on other joint activities of the five specialist societies .

10 experts in consumer protection

Food Chemistry workshop in Jena

10/18
15th March 2018

The 28th working conference of the Southeast Regional Association of the Food Chemical Society will take place in Jena on March 22nd and 23rd. Food scientists from research, industry and trade laboratories come together at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena to present and discuss current research results. This year, too, the focus will be on food safety and consumer protection. For example, a lecture on the analysis and characterization of beehive air is on the program. In the "beehive air therapy", patients breathe in beehive air using special devices to alleviate respiratory diseases such as asthma or bronchitis as well as allergies. There are no scientific studies that could confirm an effect. In Germany, the "beehive air therapy" is therefore not recognized as an alternative healing method and in Thuringia it has meanwhile even been banned due to a suspected "danger to life and limb and health". Against this background, qualified food chemists Kristin Recklies, Franziska Kuhn and Professor Dr. Karl Speer from the Technical University of Dresden with the question of what the beehive air is essentially made up of. They particularly looked at volatile organic compounds (so-called VOCs). The scientists in Jena will present their results and what they mean for the effect on people. During the conference , experts from industry, surveillance and private laboratories will get to the bottom of other exciting topics from analysis and consumer protection. Among other things, it is about the dangers that hemp-containing foods pose to consumers and how antibiotic residues can be determined quickly and reliably. More information at
www.gdch.de/netzwerk-struktur/fachstruktur/lebensmittelchemische-gesellschaft/regionalverbaende.html. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 27 specialist groups, including the Food Chemistry Society, whose task it is to promote Food Chemistry and its related disciplines and to provide technical suggestions. For this purpose, among other things, conferences of the six regional associations are held. With almost 3,000 members, the Food Chemistry Society is the largest division in the GDCh. It organizes the German Food Chemists' Day every year - this year from September 17th to 19th in Berlin.

09 Hygiene seal for old people's homes

Food chemistry competence in Essen

09/18
March 6, 2018

On March 14th, not only food chemists from the regional association of North Rhine-Westphalia will meet at the University of Duisburg-Essen for their 2018 working conference. The Food Chemistry Society invites all players in the One Health network to discuss advanced analytics and concepts for consumer health protection. The program includes the competent legal assessment of water and air tests, as well as the analysis of ?intelligent surfaces? on textiles. University research groups from North Rhine-Westphalia present new, fundamental results on the health aspects of tea, coffee and the understanding of allergens. The varied conference program again this year impressively shows the breadth of the professional profile of state-certified food chemists. Experts in consumer health protection are increasingly having to scrutinize, for example, intelligent surfaces on textiles. It is being discussed in a thoroughly provocative manner whether interior spaces such as large kitchens in old people's homes can be certified with a uniform "tool case" made up of analytical tools for water, air and surface analysis, and whether this is perhaps an alternative to the official hygiene traffic light once propagated by the North Rhine-Westphalian Food monitoring monitoring authority . In general, the conference sets the tone. What does the training of food chemists need in the future with which skills? The contribution to water law provides an ideal basis for discussion, as the Drinking Water Ordinance offers an excellent construct to learn about analytical know-how, an understanding of regulatory Toxicology and the application of law. Another lecture deals with the extent to which scientific experts or consumers understand media-conveyed statistics. Which mistakes are made when interpreting mistakes and which risks are ?non-statistics?? After all, it is about people and their own health. The participants exchange views on the assessment of partly contradicting results on the effects of fatty acid metabolites from meat, but also on the protective effects of green tea ingredients on colon cancer cells. It is also discussed when food allergens act as such in the gastrointestinal tract. The participants can also look forward to the lecture, in which the general working method of the State Criminal Police Office is clearly presented using the analysis of narcotics. More information at
https://www.gdch.de/netzwerk-struktur/fachstruktur/lebensmittelchemische-gesellschaft/regionalverbaende.html. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 27 specialist groups, including the Food Chemistry Society, whose task it is to promote Food Chemistry and its related disciplines and to provide technical suggestions. For this purpose, among other things, conferences of the six regional associations are held. With almost 3,000 members, the Food Chemistry Society is the largest division in the GDCh. It organizes the German Food Chemists' Day every year - this year from September 17th to 19th in Berlin.

08 Ars legendi Faculty Prize Mathematics and Natural Sciences 2018 - Prize winners have been announced

08/18
March 1, 2018

The Ars legendi faculty award for excellent University teaching teaching in mathematics and the natural sciences goes this year to Frank Sprenger from the University of Regensburg (Biology), Klaus Lehmann from the Bonn-Rhein-Sieg University of Applied Sciences (chemistry), Leif Döring from the University of Mannheim (mathematics ), as well as to Bernd-Uwe Runge and Philipp Möhrke from the University of Konstanz (Physics). The Ars legendi Faculty Prize for Mathematics and Natural Sciences is awarded to scientists who distinguish themselves through outstanding, innovative and exemplary performance in teaching, advice and support. The prize is awarded by the Stifterverband, the German Mathematicians Association, the German Physical Society, the German Chemical Society and the Association of Biology, Biosciences and Biomedicine in Germany. The award has been given since 2014 in the categories of Biology, chemistry, mathematics and Physics and is endowed with 5,000 euros each. The winners were selected by an eleven-person jury made up of representatives from the field, representatives from university didactics and students. She awarded the Ars legendi Faculty Prize 2018 to the following university professors: In the subject of Biology, Frank Sprenger represents the subject of genetics at the University of Regensburg. He is currently the Dean of Studies and in this capacity has made a significant contribution to the restructuring of the biological courses. Under his leadership and driven by his commitment, it was possible to implement a whole range of innovative measures. For example, a separate module was created to convey ?key competencies?, the sequence of exams was made more flexible, digital learning platforms and various media were integrated into the learning concept in a didactically sensible manner, and the information on offer for those interested in studying was significantly improved. The jury was also impressed by the "backstage discussions" with selected students after each lecture, which enable them to immediately recognize and address the needs of the students, even with a very large number of students. In chemistry Klaus Lehmann represents chemistry, in particular general chemistry and Organic Chemistry at the Bonn-Rhein-Sieg University of Applied Sciences. Mr. Lehmann is characterized by a very reflective view of subject didactic requirements and the needs of his students. He is particularly involved in the introductory phase and has developed or adapted various formats that are tailored to the students in a very different way. Particularly noteworthy is the ?study workshop?, which primarily offers students help to help themselves in the introductory phase and thus effectively counteracts the increasingly heterogeneous composition of new students. The concept of the ?study workshop? has already found imitators in other faculties. At the same time, Mr. Lehmann also integrates challenging formats for particularly committed and capable students, for whom he opens up new horizons. In the subject of mathematics Leif Döring has only recently held a chair for stochastics at the University of Mannheim. It is all the more impressive to see the dedication and dynamism with which he is committed to improving teaching in addition to his research activities. Particularly noteworthy is the concept of ?individualized tutorials?, with which he can respond unconventionally (eg ?sample solutions on YouTube?) and in a very flexible way to the individual needs of the various students. This takes into account the increasing heterogeneity of the student body on both sides by specifically promoting weaker students, while at the same time encouraging stronger students in a constructive way. In Physics Bernd-Uwe Runge passes the novice internship at the University of Konstanz, Philipp Möhrke is a researcher at the same university assistant at the Department of Physics majoring in physics education. In experimental sciences, practical training in experiments plays a decisive role. The two award winners are very reflective of this role as well as the didactic requirements of internship attempts and have designed their beginner internship accordingly. What is particularly impressive, in addition to many other details, is a completely new preparation of the topic of "measurement uncertainty analysis" over 4 semesters away from pure cookbook knowledge towards a deeper understanding. In this way, the students are not only introduced to scientific work, but are also encouraged to always approach their own (and those of others) scientific results with a critical distance. Award ceremony Interested parties are cordially invited to the ceremonial awarding of the Ars legendi Faculty Award Mathematics and Natural Sciences 2018, which will take place on April 26, 2018 at 6 p.m. in the Science Center / Deutsches Museum Bonn. As part of the public event, the experimental physicist Metin Tolan (University of Dortmund) will give a generally understandable lecture. Further information Information on the Ars legendi Faculty Prize for Mathematics and Natural Sciences can be found at https://stifterverband.org/ars-legendi-mn Contact:
Georg Düchs, Tel .: (02224) 9232-37, E-Mail: duechs@dpg-physik.de Press contact Stifterverband:
Peggy Groß, phone: (030) 982 322-530, email: peggy.gross@stifterverband.de

07 Conference by and for young scientists

20th spring symposium of the JungChemikerForum with awarding of the Carl-Roth-Förderpreis

07/18
February 27, 2018

"Bridging the Gap" is the motto of the 20th spring symposium of the JungChemikerForum (JCF) of the German Chemical Society (GDCh). From March 21 to 24, 2018, around 350 young scientists will come together at the University of Konstanz to present their research to a young and critical audience and to exchange ideas on an international level. In addition to lectures, poster sessions and workshops, the top-class scientific program also offers a diverse supporting program. As a highlight, the Carl Roth Award will also be awarded to Anne Fuhrmann, Humboldt University in Berlin. The JCF Spring Symposium is one of the largest conferences in Europe by and for young scientists. The event is organized annually by a regional forum of the JungChemikerForum, the youth organization of the GDCh. This year the JCF Konstanz took over the organization and created a varied program. In addition to lectures by internationally renowned scientists, junior research group leaders and young scientists also have their say. In poster sessions, students and doctoral candidates from all areas of chemistry and related natural sciences have the opportunity to exchange ideas. Individual posters are announced in three-minute poster presentations, and poster and lecture award winners are honored - after evaluation by the participants. The conference program also includes workshops, excursions and a variety of social activities. For the anniversary of the spring symposium, the organizing team has chosen the motto ?Bridging the Gap - building bridges from school to studies to professional life?. In this context, lectures from industry and young professionals were increasingly included in the lecture program this year, giving conference visitors an insight into professional life. In addition, the GDCh career service will have a stand on site and answer questions about starting a career and Career . Following the symposium, there will be an event for schoolchildren on the afternoon of March 24th. After an experimental lecture, they have the opportunity to visit chemistry laboratories at the University of Konstanz. Another highlight of the spring symposium will be the Carl Roth Award on March 22nd. The GDCh awards the award, endowed with 5000 euros, to young chemists who develop resource-conserving synthetic routes or who use chemicals in innovative ways. The prize is financed by Carl Roth GmbH & Co. KG, which will also contribute a further 3,000 euros in the form of a voucher. The winner is Anne Fuhrmann, Humboldt University Berlin. She receives the award for her research on polymer materials that can heal themselves autonomously or through activation with temperature or light. Fuhrmann's research could lead to products made of such polymer materials or with a corresponding coating repairing themselves as often as required. A costly, environmentally harmful replacement of the entire product could thus be avoided. Further information can be found at www.jcf-fruehjahrssymposium.de. With around 31,000 members, the German Chemical Society is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of new scientific knowledge. The GDCh supports the creation of networks, transdisciplinary and international cooperation and continuous education and training in schools, universities and in the professional environment. The GDCh has 27 specialist groups as well as 60 local associations and young chemists forums at 54 university locations. The JCF forms a nationwide platform for over 10,000 young members of the GDCh.

06 It all starts with the analysis

New approaches to the analysis of microplastics at the analytica conference 2018

06/18
February 22, 2018

The focus of the analytica conference from April 10th to 12th, 2018 in Munich is on current questions and solution approaches in analytics. In 45 sessions, experts report on their research results in an application-related manner - for example, on new, more reliable approaches to the analysis of microplastics in water. The scientific program of the analytica conference is organized by the Analytik Forum, consisting of the German Chemical Society (GDCh), the Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (GBM) and the German Society for Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (DGKL). Modern analytical methods reveal problems that our industrialized world brings with it: Plastics made up of polymers are enjoying growing popularity. Due to the lower production costs, the number of disposable plastic items is increasing, which - if the recycling systems or waste disposal fail - end up in the environment. There the polymer particles are subject to physical and chemical weathering. Smaller and smaller particles are created, which are ultimately only a few micrometers in size. Many such particles, known as microplastics, end up in aquatic systems and eventually in the oceans. The analysis of microplastics poses a number of challenges. After sampling, the microplastic particles must first be separated from the much more numerous natural particles. The remaining particles must be correctly analyzed in terms of polymer type, number of particles, size and even shape. The first approaches in which the particles were evaluated yielded strongly distorted results. Therefore, three alternative approaches were further developed to better meet the requirements of microplastic analysis in water: FTIR, Raman and pyrolysis GC-MS methods. All three methods will be presented by experts during the session and their advantages and weaknesses will be discussed. The analytica conference accompanies the 26th analytica, the leading international trade fair for laboratory technology, analysis and Biotechnology from April 10th to 13th, 2018 in Munich. The conference will take place in the ICM - International Congress Center Munich, on the Munich exhibition grounds. Other sessions deal with the use of analytical methods in Food Chemistry and Toxicology as well as the handling of big data. Admission is free for visitors to analytica. The joint stand of the Analytik Forum is located in Hall B2, No. 504. The current program for the analytica conference can be found at www.gdch.de/analyticaconf2018 or in the dates database at www.analytica.de/conference. Contact for the press: analytica conference analytica
Dr. Karin J. Schmitz Barbara Kals
German Chemical Society Exhibition Munich
public relation PR manager
Tel .: +49 69 7917-493 Tel .: +49 89 949-21473
Email: pr@gdch.de Email: barbara.kals@messe-muenchen.de

05 Primary school meals put to the test

Working conference of food chemists in Berlin

05/18
20th February 2018

On March 6th, food chemists from Berlin, Brandenburg and Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania will meet at the Beuth University of Applied Sciences in Berlin for their 24th workshop. The conference of the Northeast Regional Association food Chemical Society is organized. Current topics from analytics and consumer protection are on the agenda. The first lecture already deals with a sensitive topic - it's about school lunches. Scientists from the Department of Food Chemistry and Analytics at the Technical University of Berlin report on their investigations into the quality of lunch at all-day elementary schools in Berlin. They carried out two studies on behalf of the Berlin Senate Administration. The background to this was that the quality standard of the German Society for Nutrition (DGE) for school catering is the contractual basis for school caterers, but so far there has hardly been any quality control of the menus delivered. In the studies, the scientists examined the meals of four caterers at random from a sensory, chemical-analytical and nutritional point of view and evaluated them in comparison to the DGE recommendations. The researchers will present their results at the conference. The rest of the program focuses on contaminants and residues. It is about the analytical challenges in mycotoxin (mold toxin) analysis as well as the effects of arsenolipids in liver cells and neurons. In addition, the participants share the results of the zinc bioavailability and intestinal zinc absorption. Technological aspects of Food Chemistry are also on the agenda when the oxidative stability of omega-3 and omega-6 fatty acids in rapeseed oil is shown. And even the global food trade is addressed when the Codex Alimentarius presents the internationally harmonized standards for global food trade. Further information at https://www.gdch.de/netzwerk-struktur/fachstruktur/lebensmittelchemische-gesellschaft/regionalverbaende.html. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 27 specialist groups, including the Food Chemistry Society, whose task it is to promote Food Chemistry and its related disciplines and to provide technical suggestions. For this purpose, among other things, conferences of the six regional associations are held. With almost 3,000 members, the Food Chemistry Society is the largest division in the GDCh. It organizes the German Food Chemists' Day every year - this year from September 17th to 19th in Berlin.

04 Chemistry as a driver of innovation in Medicine

Two young scientists receive the Klaus Grohe Prize for Medicinal Chemistry


04/18
20th February 2018

From March 11 to 14, 2018, around 200 experts will come together at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena to exchange information on the latest research results on the ?Frontiers in Medicinal Chemistry?. Current developments, new approaches and innovative technologies in drug research are often based on findings from medicinal chemistry. As part of the conference organized by the Medicinal Chemistry division of the German Chemical Society (GDCh), outstanding young scientists who have distinguished themselves with their research in this area are honored. Medicinal Chemistry uses the latest scientific findings in Biology and chemistry to produce active substances. They make innovative drugs possible. With their work, two young scientists have contributed fundamentally to future drug research. Dr. Matthias Schiedel, who did his doctorate at the Albert-Ludwigs-Universität Freiburg, and Dr. Mateja Klika ?kopi?, who did her doctorate at the Technical University of Dortmund, received the Klaus Grohe Prize for Medicinal Chemistry on March 12th. The award is presented by the Klaus Grohe Foundation for Medicinal Chemistry, which is part of the GDCh. The innovation prize in medical / pharmaceutical chemistry, endowed with 5000 euros, will also be awarded during the conference . The joint award of the GDCh division Medicinal Chemistry and division for Pharmaceutical / Medicinal Chemistry the German Pharmaceutical Society share this year Junior Professor Dr. Finn K. Hansen, University of Leipzig, and Dr. Alexander Titz, Helmholtz Institute for Pharmaceutical Research Saarland. The doctoral prize in the field of medical / pharmaceutical chemistry has been awarded annually since 2013 by the GDCh division for Medicinal Chemistry to three scientists who each receive 500 euros as prize money. In 2018 these are Dr. Stefan Krimmer, who did his doctorate at the Philipps University of Marburg, Dr. Lucas Robke, for his doctorate at the Technical University and the Max Planck Institute for Molecular Physiology in Dortmund, and Dr. Robert Wodtke, who wrote his doctoral thesis at the Helmholtz Center Dresden-Rossendorf. Further information can be found at: www.gdch.de/medchem2018. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 27 specialist groups, including the Medicinal Chemistry division . It has existed since 1971 and has over 800 members. These work in university institutes, other research institutions and in the pharmaceutical industry. They are mainly chemists and pharmacists, but also computer scientists, process engineers and others. The division aims to bridge the gap between chemistry on the one hand and Biology, Medicine and Pharmacy on the other.

03 Annette Beck-Sickinger receives the Albrecht Kossel Prize

Biochemist is honored in Halle for her research on peptide-protein interaction

03/18
15th February 2018

The German Chemical Society (GDCh) awards Annette G. Beck-Sickinger, University of Leipzig, the Albrecht Kossel Prize, endowed with 7500 euros, for outstanding work in the field of Biochemistry . Beck-Sickinger will receive the award on March 9th at the 6th Halle Conference of Recombinant Proteins, which will take place from March 8th to 9th at the German Academy of Natural Scientists Leopoldina. The event is supported by the Biochemistry division of the GDCh. Professor Dr. Annette G. Beck-Sickinger convinced the jury with her contributions to the biochemical and structural characterization and elucidation of the interactions of different membrane proteins. With her research, she did pioneering work, particularly with regard to the functional influence of tailor-made ligands. The scientist combines chemical syntheses with cell biological analysis to deal with biological and biomedical issues. Beck-Sickinger is one of the most visible scientists in the world in her field. Applications of her research range from tumor therapy and the treatment of metabolic diseases to pain research and the development of novel biomaterials. Annette G. Beck-Sickinger studied chemistry and Biology at the University of Tübingen, where she received her doctorate in 1989. After several international research stays, she completed her habilitation in Tübingen in 1995. This was followed by an assistant professorship at the ETH Zurich until she was appointed professor of Biochemistry and bioorganic chemistry at the University of Leipzig in 1999. Since 2008 she has also been the managing director of the Institute for Biochemistry. Beck-Sickinger has been a GDCh member for over thirty years. From 2004 up to and including 2011 she was a member of the company's Management Board. From 2006 to 2007 she was Vice President. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 27 specialist groups and sections and awards numerous prizes for outstanding achievements in the various sub-disciplines of chemistry. The Albrecht Kossel Prize, endowed with 7,500 euros, was established in 2012 and awarded for the first time in 2014. The award's namesake, Ludwig Karl Martin Leonhard Albrecht Kossel (1853 - 1927), was a German biochemist, physician and physiologist. In 1910 he was awarded the Nobel Prize for Physiology or Medicine for his research on the cell nucleus and the isolation of nucleic acids and determination of their constitutions.

Prof. Dr. Annette G. Beck-Sickinger

02 Conference of Chemistry Lecturers in Jena

Bill Morandi receives the Carl Duisberg Memorial Prize


02/18
February 6, 2018

The Chemistry Lecturer Conference 2018 will take place from March 5th to 7th at the Friedrich Schiller University Jena. University professors from the Faculties of Chemistry from Germany and neighboring countries meet to exchange information on news in research and teaching at an international level. On March 5th, the German Chemical Society (GDCh) will award Dr. Bill Morandi, MPI Mülheim, with the Carl Duisberg Memorial Prize. The organizer of the conference, the Association of German University Professors of Chemistry (ADUC) of the GDCh, also awards three young scientists with the ADUC prizes. The topics of the conference include current knowledge and research results from all fields of chemistry as well as didactic developments and new approaches to conveying complex issues in teaching. At the annual conference , outstanding chemists are awarded GDCh prizes. The Carl Duisberg Memorial Prize goes to Dr. Bill Morandi, Max Planck Institute for Coal Research in Mülheim ad Ruhr. The award, which is endowed with 7,500 euros, supports young academics in chemistry. The 35-year-old chemist receives the award for his outstanding research and his excellent publications in the field of homogeneously catalyzed syntheses. Through aliphatic carbon-oxygen bond activation, the direct catalytic synthesis of unprotected amines and catalytically reversible reactions, he develops innovative methods for demanding syntheses. Although Morandi is still in the early stages of his work, he has already achieved noticeably innovative results in his research area after a short time. In addition, ADUC three young scientists from different fields of chemistry for establishing an independent research area: The winners are: Dr. Ulf-Peter Apfel, Ruhr University Bochum, Jun.-Professor Dr. Philipp Heretsch, Free University of Berlin, and Dr. Oldamur Hollóczki, Mulliken Center for Theoretical Chemistry, Bonn. Further information can be found at www.gdch.de/cdt2018. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 27 specialist groups and sections and awards numerous prizes for special achievements in chemical research. Up to three junior research group leaders (post- doctoral candidates, scholarship holders or junior professors ) are honored annually by the Association of German University Professors of Chemistry (ADUC) , which is part of the GDCh, for establishing an independent research area.

01 Analytics is getting even 'smarter'

analytica conference 2018 in Munich deals with current developments in analytics


01/2018
January 16, 2018

The 26th analytica, the leading international trade fair for laboratory technology, analysis and Biotechnology, will take place on the grounds of Messe München from April 10th to 13th, 2018. It will be accompanied by the analytica conference from April 10 to 12, at which scientists will report on current topics in analytics in an application-oriented manner. One of the main topics of the conference this year is big data. The analytica conference's scientific program is organized by the Analytik Forum, consisting of the German Chemical Society (GDCh), the Society for Biochemistry and Molecular Biology (GBM) and the German Society for Clinical Chemistry and Laboratory Medicine (DGKL). Analytical chemistry is one of the most versatile fields in chemistry. It connects numerous sub-disciplines and is an interface to socially relevant topics. Many Nobel Prizes have been awarded for analytical developments, and technological leaps are always based on findings from highly developed analytics. At the analytica conference, experts from all over the world show what is currently driving the discipline. One focus of the conference is on big data. Because digitization has long since found its way into the analytical laboratories. But how can huge amounts of analytical data be processed efficiently? And which 'smart' solutions optimize existing processes? The presentations of the sessions give a concentrated overview of new methods, procedures, techniques and their specific application possibilities. Other sessions deal with the use of analytical methods in Food Chemistry, in the detection of microplastics and in Toxicology. The analytica conference takes place in the ICM - International Congress Center Munich, on the exhibition grounds. Admission is free for visitors to analytica. The joint stand of the Analytik Forum is located in Hall B2, No. 504. The current program for the analytica conference can be found at www.gdch.de/analyticaconf2018 or in the dates database at www.analytica.de/conference. Contact for the press:

analytica conference
Dr. Karin J. Schmitz
German Chemical Society
public relation
Tel .: +49 69 7917-493

Email: pr@gdch.de

analytica
Barbara Kals
Exhibition Munich
PR manager
Tel .: +49 89 949-21473
Email: barbara.kals@messe-muenchen.de

Contact

Dr. Karin J. Schmitz
Head of GDCh-
public relations
pr@gdch.de
Tel. 069 / 7917-493

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last modified: 10.05.2021 16:19 H from