Press releases 2017

48 Association for Chemistry and Economics honors young women scientists

Study Prize Business Chemistry 2017 for Laura Franke and Melanie Zhang


48/17
December 12, 2017

The Association for Chemistry and Economics (VCW), a division of the German Chemical Society (GDCh), awards the Study Prize Business Chemistry 2017 to Laura Franke and Melanie Zhang. You will receive the award, each endowed with 1000 euros, on January 26, 2018 as part of the VCW conference "Value creation in transition - chemistry between innovations and new business models?" in Kronberg. Laura Franke studied business chemistry at Ulm University, where she graduated with distinction in 2016. As part of an internship and her master's thesis at Linde AG, she increasingly dealt with the topics of sustainable energy management and environmentally friendly mobility, which aroused her enthusiasm for hydrogen as an energy carrier. In her thesis, the award winner dealt with the ecological and economic aspects of a possible hydrogen supply in the transport sector as part of a supply chain analysis. Today Franke works for BMW in research as a project manager for the technology project 'hydrogen fuel cell'. After a bachelor's degree in chemistry at the Johann Wolfgang Goethe University in Frankfurt am Main, Melanie Zhang completed a master's degree in business chemistry at the Westphalian Wilhelms University in Münster, which she graduated with a grade of 1.1 in 2017. She gained insights into the professional world during various internships in the chemical industry and at consulting companies. During her studies she was an active member of the business chemists of the University of Münster eV (WUM). There she acquired corporate partners for the business chemists forum and organized workshops for the exchange between corporate partners and students. In 2017, Zhang joined Boston Consulting as a consultant. The VCW Business Chemistry Study Prize is announced annually in German-speaking countries and honors excellent academic achievements in the field of business chemistry. The aim of the Business Chemistry Study Prize is to sharpen the profile of the subject within the natural science faculty. In particular, the subject of business chemistry and the award-winning graduates are to be made better known in the industrial environment in order to emphasize the attractiveness of the course for students. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the Association for Chemistry and Economics, which emerged in 2002 from the Working Group for Chemistry and Business, which was founded in 1999. The VCW has set itself the goal of combining natural sciences, especially chemistry, and economics.

Laura Franke
Melanie Zhang

47 Meyer Galow Prize for Business Chemistry 2017 goes to Markus Heitzmann

New drug protects diabetics with existing cardiovascular diseases

47/17
16th November 2017

 

Dr. Markus Heitzmann, Boehringer Ingelheim Pharma, will receive the Meyer Galow Prize for Business Chemistry on November 28 from the foundation of the same name, which is part of the German Chemical Society (GDCh). The award, endowed with 10,000 euros, is given to scientists who have advanced a current innovation in chemistry. Heitzmann made a significant contribution to the successful launch of the new drug Jardiance® (empagliflozin). The oral antidiabetic drug not only lowers blood sugar, but can also lower the risk of cardiovascular events in patients with existing cardiovascular diseases. The award ceremony takes place during a ceremony at Boehringer Ingelheim, Ingelheim, and is presented by the President-elect of the German Chemical Society, Dr. Matthias Urmann, made.

 

People with diabetes and cardiovascular disease are at high risk of dying from cardiovascular death, even with modern therapy plans. The anti-diabetic drug Jardiance®, which the award winner was instrumental in launching, has been shown to reduce this risk in adults with type 2 diabetes and existing cardiovascular weakness. In the EMPA-REG OUTCOME® study, empagliflozin reduced the relative risk of cardiovascular death (as part of the composite primary endpoint) by 38 percent in adults with type 2 diabetes and existing cardiovascular disease compared to placebo and in addition to standard antidiabetic and cardiovascular therapy. Dr. Markus Heitzmann prepared the active ingredient market entry and ensured the highly complex supply of active ingredients. Although the synthesis of the active ingredient empagliflozin places high demands on production, technology, quality management and environmental protection, Heitzmann succeeded in creating the prerequisites for bringing the drug onto the market quickly.

 

In addition to numerous invited guests, Hubertus von Baumbach, CEO of Boehringer Ingelheim, Dr. Matthias Urmann, President-designate of the GDCh for the years 2018/19, as well as the founder Professor Dr. Erhard Meyer-Galow attend. The laudation for the award winner will be given by Professor Dr. Manfred Psiorz, Corporate Vice President Chemical Manufacturing and Supply, Boehringer Ingelheim GmbH.

 

The Meyer Galow Prize for Business Chemistry is awarded annually to scientists in German-speaking countries who have successfully introduced a current innovation in chemistry to the market. The focus is on market launches that primarily take sustainability into account. The prize is awarded annually by the Meyer Galow Foundation for Business Chemistry, which is part of the GDCh. Founder is Professor Dr. Erhard Meyer-Galow, the former CEO of Hüls AG and former President of the GDCh. Meyer-Galow mainly worked at the interface between chemistry and the market and gave lectures on business chemistry at the University of Münster.

 

About the event:
The award ceremony will take place during a ceremony on November 28, 2017 at 11:00 a.m. at Boehringer Ingelheim, Binger Straße 173, 55216 Ingelheim. Media representatives are cordially invited. Interviews are possible by appointment. Please register as a media representative at pr@gdch.de.

 

The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It maintains numerous foundations, such as the Meyer Galow Foundation for Business Chemistry, which Professor Dr. Erhard Meyer-Galow in 2012 to further promote business chemistry, especially under the aspects of sustainability and the need for chemical products or processes with high value for our society. The task of the foundation, which is administered by the GDCh, is the annual award of the "Meyer Galow Prize for Business Chemistry"

Dr. Markus Heitzmann

46 German Chemical Society: Matthias Urmann becomes new President

46/17
November 14, 2017

At its meeting on September 12, 2017 in Berlin, the board of the German Chemical Society eV Matthias Urmann, Sanofi-Aventis Deutschland GmbH, elected the company's future President. He will take up his post on January 1, 2018, succeeding Professor Thisbe K. Lindhorst, Christian-Albrechts-Universität Kiel. The previous President Thisbe K. Lindhorst and Dr. Thomas Weber, BASF SE elected. Matthias Urmann studied chemistry at the University of Heidelberg from 1983 to 1989. There he also received his doctorate from 1989 to 1992 under Professor Günter Helmchen. After a postdoctoral stay at Harvard University, Cambridge, USA in the working group of Professor Elias J. Corey, he joined what was then Hoechst AG in 1993 as head of the Medicinal Chemistry laboratory. After various roles in the company, including as Head of administration at Sanofi R&D Germany, one of the companies that emerged from Hoechst AG, and Head of the Insulins & Peptides department within the Diabetes Research & Translational Medicine unit, he is now in the Business Development Diabetes External division Active in innovation. Urmann joined the GDCh as a student and is active in the GDCh specialist groups for Medicinal Chemistry and the Liebig Association for Organic Chemistry . He served the Liebig Association for four years as deputy chairman. He is currently a member of the board there. In 2015 Urmann was elected to the board of the GDCh for the period of office from 2016 to 2019. In addition to his involvement in the GDCh, he is a board member of Science4Life, an initiative that has been supported by the GDCh for many years and supports young entrepreneurs from the life sciences / chemistry & energy sector on their way to self-employment. In his future role as GDCh President, too, he would like to motivate people to implement new ideas and research results from the university in their own company. In general, the promotion of innovations is important to him. "Only with flexibility and the willingness to constantly change is it possible to set the right course for the future," says Urmann. ?The GDCh was always active here, quickly recognized new trends and set accents. I therefore see my main task as supporting the GDCh in ensuring that the promotion of innovations continues to be the focus. ?To this end, Urmann would also like to strengthen partnerships between universities and industry and reconcile the various assignments of basic university research and application-oriented industrial research. With around 31,000 members, the German Chemical Society is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of new scientific knowledge. The GDCh supports the creation of networks, transdisciplinary and international cooperation and continuous education and training in schools, universities and in the professional environment. The GDCh has 28 specialist groups and sections as well as 60 local associations.

Dr. Matthias Urmann

45 Learning for life

2018 training program now available.

45/17
2nd November 2017

With the new advanced training program for 2018, the German Chemical Society (GDCh) is again offering those interested in advanced training many opportunities to develop professionally, professionally and personally. The 2018 offer consists of 84 courses from 17 subject areas. In addition to advanced training on chemical topics such as analytical chemistry or synthesis methods, the GDCh also offers courses for career advancement such as "Successful networking in the job for chemists". The program was expanded to include 16 new courses. Another new feature is that 17 courses that focus on the subject of "Industry 4.0" are marked accordingly. The ?Metabolomics? course, which deals with the analytical chemistry behind the modern -omics processes, is new to the offer. Professor Dr. Georg Pohnert, Friedrich Schiller University Jena, teaches the participants not only the basic chemistry, but also the analytical challenges, possible solutions and the complex data evaluation of these methods. In addition, the course offers space to develop strategies for successful metabolome analysis for your own research questions. The ?Good Research Practice? course provides an overview of the basic elements of quality assurance. Professor Dr. Jürgen Pomp, University of Applied Sciences Bonn-Rhein-Sieg, Rheinbach, gives the participants tools from the field of quality assurance that help to increase data integrity in day-to-day research and to obtain sustainable, valid research results. The focus of the event is on the planning, implementation and qualification of devices as well as the validation of processes, documentation and the archiving of research results. How you can take advantage of opportunities without twisting yourself is the topic of the new course ?Successful Networking at Work for Chemists?. Practice shows that people who have a solid and trustworthy network are more successful professionally. The personnel developer and career advisor Doris Brenner teaches the participants the most important rules of the game of serious and goal-oriented networking and shows how practical implementation can be successful in everyday working life. It also deals with the importance of virtual social networks such as Xing or LinkedIn and what needs to be considered when dealing with them. As a further innovation, all courses are marked in the training program that are particularly relevant to the field of digitization and, in particular, to the interlinking of industrial production with modern information and communication technology. They are provided with a clearly visible symbol "Industry 4.0" and thus enable the targeted selection of training courses that prepare for this important future field. The proven GDCh specialist programs ?Certified Business Chemist (GDCh) ®? and ?Certified Quality Expert GxP? as well as the advanced program ?Certified Quality Expert GxP Plus? will also be offered in 2018. In all courses, the participants benefit from speakers with a high level of experience and competence. Detailed information and the program for download can be found at www.gdch.de/fortbildung. The printed program can be requested from fb@gdch.de. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of scientific knowledge. The GDCh supports training in schools and universities as well as continuous training for work and Career.

44,300 euros per month for chemistry students

Hofmann scholarships 2018 announced

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October 26, 2017

The August Wilhelm von Hofmann Foundation established by the German Chemical Society (GDCh) will also be awarding scholarships to support students for the 2018 summer semester. Bachelor students in chemistry and related areas can receive a scholarship of 300 euros per month from April 2018 with a duration of 18 or twelve months. Applications must be submitted by February 1, 2018 to the respective GDCh local association chairperson or the spokesperson for the regional forums of the JungChemikerForum (JCF). Bachelor students in chemistry and related fields with very good academic achievements who are in an economically unfavorable situation can apply for one of the approximately 20 scholarships of the August Wilhelm von Hofmann Foundation. Another requirement is that the students are in the third to last or penultimate semester of their bachelor's degree at the beginning of the 2018 summer semester. The scholarship cannot be extended. Every year in the winter semester there is a new application cycle. The scholarship is not counted towards BAFöG benefits, but double funding in addition to other performance-based material funding from the gifted funding agencies is excluded. The August Wilhelm von Hofmann Foundation is named after the first president of the GDCh predecessor organization, the German Chemical Society, founded in 1867. The founder is a long-standing GDCh member who died in 2010 and who bequeathed the majority of his fortune to the GDCh to support talented chemistry students. Further information at www.gdch.de/hofmannstiftung. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with around 31,000 members. The GDCh manages numerous dependent foundations on a fiduciary basis. The purpose of these foundations is to award prizes, sponsorship awards and grants. In addition to the August Wilhelm von Hofmann Foundation, special mention should be made of the Karl Ziegler Foundation, which awards the Karl Ziegler Prize, the GDCh award, worth 50,000 euros, for outstanding scientific achievements in chemistry. Also worth mentioning are the Paul Bunge Prize awarded by the Hans R. Jenemann Foundation, as well as the awards from the Hermann Schnell, Hellmut Bredereck, Georg Manecke, Klaus Grohe and Meyer Galow Foundation . Foundation councils decide on the award of prizes, awards and grants.

43 From Liliput to Nano

Freelancer Chemists and owners of free independent laboratories meet in Mainz


43/17
4th October 2017

From October 19-20, the division for Freelancer Chemists and owners of free independent laboratories and owners of independent laboratories of the German Chemical Society (GDCh) invites you to the 15th Colloquium Chimicum in Mainz. At the conference, which this year has the motto ?From Liliput to Nano?, freelance chemists including analytical chemists with or without testing facilities meet with colleagues from industry, universities or authorities. In Mainz they find out about current developments, exchange experiences and take a look outside the box. The lecture program on October 20th gives an insight into the diverse and varied tasks that freelance chemists face every day. For example, Claudia Piorr, Chemisches Labor Piorr, Neulußheim, reports: "Disasters and scandals arouse increased attention in people - and increase the circulation of test journals." In her lecture, she shows how (supposed) scandals have occurred in the last ten Years and years have repeatedly led to orders that the trade would otherwise not have placed, and how small, specialized laboratories could also benefit from them. Another exciting topic is dedicated to Steffen Beccard, Max Planck Institute for Polymer Research, Mainz. He reports on his research on edible gels, especially inulin gels. Inulin is a dietary fiber with a low calorie content and can therefore be used as a diet for diabetes. As a gel, it forms a nanocrystalline structure that is similar to the structure of fats in solid form. Beccard explains the gel formation of long-chain inulin from the perspective of basic research and shows the associated potential as a fat substitute in food. Even before the start of the lecture program, the conference starts on October 19 with the members' meeting of the division, a cultural program and the opportunity to exchange experiences at a joint dinner. Further information at www.gdch.de/collchim2017. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the division Freelancer Chemists and owners of free independent laboratories and Owners of Independent Independent Laboratories with over 150 members.

42 clean men in action

13th European Detergents Conference in Berlin


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28th September 2017

Detergent chemistry is not just about clean laundry. In addition to efficient and resource-saving textile cleaning, the scientists also deal with the use of surfactants in personal care. On October 18, experts will come together in Berlin at the European Detergents Conference (EDC) to exchange ideas about raw materials, technologies and health and safety aspects in detergent chemistry. The division of Detergent Chemistry the German Chemical Society (GDCh) oriented as in recent years, together with the SEPAWA (Association of Soap, Perfume and Detergent Experts eV) and within the SEPAWA annual congress of the conference. The EDC complements and enriches the important event of the detergent and cleaning agent industry with its scientific lecture program. The scientific program of the conference consists of ten lectures. Experts from research and industry present the latest findings from their specialist field and pick up on current developments in basic and application-related research on detergents. The focus is on the washing process from a molecular point of view. For example, two lectures address the use of nanoparticles in processes at interfaces. Because nanotechnology has long since found its way into detergent chemistry. Nanocarriers, that is, tiny ?transporters? that can absorb and transport active ingredients, offer completely new possibilities. The speakers show what great potential there is in such surfactants with nanocarriers. On the occasion of the conference , the division also awards the sponsorship award for outstanding achievements in basic research in detergents and cleaning agents, which is accompanied by a lecture by the winner. This year the Dr. Viet Hildebrand. In his dissertation at the University of Potsdam he developed an extraordinary group of "switchable" polymer surfactants and set new accents for possible new components in detergents. Further information at: http://sepawa-congress.de/home-page/programm/6867-2/ and https://www.gdch.de/index.php?id=102. The German Chemical Society , with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. The " Detergent Chemistry " division was founded in 1974 as a forum for the scientific exchange of opinions and experience between all chemists and technicians from universities and research institutes, authorities and from the raw materials and detergent industry who deal with the problems of detergent chemistry. The division currently has around 390 members. The experts of the division are competent and sought-after discussion partners for national and supranational authorities in all questions of environmental and consumer safety for detergents and cleaning agents.

41 46th German Food Chemists Day 2017

Awards for food chemists


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26th September 2017

During a ceremony today, Professor Dr. Reiner Wittkowski, Berlin, awarded the Joseph König commemorative coin by the German Chemical Society (GDCh) at the 46th German Food Chemists Day at the University of Würzburg. The Food Chemistry Society - organizer of the conference and largest division in the GDCh - also awarded the Kurt Täufel Prize of the Young Scientist to Dr. Jörg Driver, Mainz, and the Bruno Roßmann Prize to Florian Kaltner, Oberschleißheim. In addition, Dr. Jochen Ulrich Ziegler, Ludwigshafen, with the Gerhard Billek Prize and Dr. Fabian Weber, Bonn, was awarded the Joseph Schormüller grant. Professor Dr. Reiner Wittkowski, Federal Institute for Risk Assessment (BfR), Berlin, received the Joseph König commemorative coin for his "impressive commitment as a food chemist in many scientific functions", as the award document says. He was the only food chemist to head the international intergovernmental organization "International Organization for Vine and Wine (OIV)". In addition, Wittkowski was able to make an important contribution to authenticity research through his work on NMR Spectroscopy in food analysis, including in the area of wine. The Joseph König commemorative coin, as stated in the foundation statutes, commemorates ?the secret government councilor Professor Dr.-Ing. Eh Dr. phil. nat. hc Dr. agr. hc Dr. med. hc Joseph König (1843 - 1930), the meritorious old master of Food Chemistry?. As a student of Liebig, he laid the foundation for the chemistry of human food and beverages. With the Kurt Täufel Prize of the Young Scientist, Dr. Jörg Driver, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, for his fundamental work on the topic of 'The role of the DNA damage response and repair in the development of colon cancer and its modulation by natural substances and nutritional factors'. Fahrer's research is characterized by innovation, creativity, interdisciplinary cooperation and competence, and his numerous scientific works, which have been published in high-ranking specialist journals, have won national and international recognition. With the Bruno Roßmann Prize, the Food Chemistry Society honors outstanding scientific work that deals with rapid methods for the detection of harmful substances in food, methods for examining food with simple means as well as the improvement of nutrition, the reduction of pollutants and better physiological utilization. This year, Florian Kaltner, Ludwig Maximilians University Munich, received the award for his work on the development and validation of an HPLC-FLD method for routine analysis with which the legally regulated fumonisins B1 and B2 in corn can be determined cost-effectively. The Gerhard Billek Prize for the best dissertation in the field of Food Chemistry to Dr. Jochen Ulrich Ziegler, University of Hohenheim, Stuttgart. This prize is announced by the GDCh for scientific originality and an interdisciplinary approach. In his work he looks at the biofunctional components of ancient wheat species and modern baking wheat in flours, germs and bread and checks whether these are environmental or hereditary in nature. In addition, Ziegler dealt with the question of what causes the better tolerance of spelled and other ancient grains compared to modern wheat varieties, which has also been reported by doctors. He shows that the different processing is more important than the ingredients of the wheat variety. Dr. Fabian Weber, Rheinische Friedrich-Wilhelms-Universität Bonn, received a scholarship from the Josef Schormüller Memorial Foundation for a stay abroad. Further information at: www.gdch.de/lchtag2017. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the Food Chemistry Society, whose task it is to promote the exchange of ideas in the field of Food Chemistry and its related disciplines and to provide technical suggestions. With over 2,900 members, the Food Chemistry Society is the largest division in the GDCh.

40 Thinking the unthinkable: How do we research tomorrow?

40/17
7th September 2017

Publication pressure, big data, cybots, competition from the Far East, but also more money and freedom for young researchers: our scientific system is subject to numerous influences from politics, society and economy and is changing rapidly. The question of how the framework conditions for research can be designed in such a way that creative and excellent thinking remains possible is the topic of the event ?Thinking the unthinkable?. The satellite event for the Science Forum Chemistry (WiFo), with which the German Chemical Society (GDCh) is celebrating its 150th anniversary this year, will take place on September 15, 2017 in the Harnack House of the Max Planck Society in Berlin. Prof. Dr. Katharina Al-Shamery is the organizer of the symposium. The professor of physical chemistry at the University of Oldenburg has been interested in the question of what the university and the research of tomorrow will look like for years: ?During an assessment in China, I met a young scientist who can produce numerous very good publications - in the fields of Chemistry that at first glance have little to do with each other. He uses cybots, computer programs that combine his specialist scientific knowledge with new research topics - and make suggestions for unusual and thus possibly unusually fruitful collaborations. ?The conversation with the young scientist was one of the triggers for Katharina Al-Shamery, the event To conceive ?Thinking the unthinkable?: ?In particular, digitization ensures that we are currently in the middle of a scientific revolution. The event is intended to help reflect this. ?A change from keynote speeches, panel discussions, new formats such as fishbowl discussions and reports by young researchers about their work provide numerous suggestions for further thinking. "We were able to win very high-ranking speakers for the topic," says Al-Shamery. For example, Professor Dr. Pooi See Lee from Nanyang Technological University in Singapore on the framework conditions that have led to the current success story of science in Asian countries such as Singapore. Professor Dr. Erhard Meyer-Galow, former CEO of Hüls AG and Stinnes AG and former GDCh President, will share his experience of how alternative knowledge processes beyond established standard procedures can inspire scientists. The topic of digitization will then play an important role in the first panel discussion: ?We have invited representatives of the view that the influence of algorithms on the future direction of research will tend to be limited, as well as those that are realistic and serious see option, "said Al-Shamery". I expect a controversial and exciting dispute about the role we want to give example Dreadnoughts in research - or must "in a fishbowl discussion in the afternoon can then also the visitors of the conference actively and continue to discuss the question of how excellence arises in science and what good framework conditions must look like with another high-ranking panel. So that these overarching and far into the future-reaching topics keep grounding, almost 20 young researchers take part in the symposium, who present their latest research results and how they have come to outstanding results. Al-Shamery: "I hope that this mixture of vision and report from the laboratory will give me indications of what we need to consider in the further development of our research landscape - so that we can continue to be coveted partners in chemical research worldwide in the future." Satellite events ?Thinking the unthinkable? can be found here. Media representatives are cordially invited to the events. Please register at pr@gdch.de. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of scientific knowledge. In 2017 the society celebrates its anniversary: 150 years ago August Wilhelm von Hofmann founded the German Chemical Society, the first predecessor organization of the GDCh in Berlin.

39 Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy

International conference with award ceremonies in Bayreuth


39/17
7th September 2017

The 39th discussion meeting of the Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy division of the German Chemical Society (GDCh) will take place from September 25th to 28th at the University of Bayreuth. Every two years the division selects an international partner for its conference . This year the partner country is France. As part of the event, to which up to 300 visitors are expected, the division awards the Felix Bloch lecture to Dr. Muslim Dvoyashkin, University of Leipzig. The Ernst Awards are also given to young scientists. The focus of the conference , entitled "39th FGMR Discussion Meeting and Joint Conference of the German and French Magnetic Resonance Societies: Advances in Magnetic Resonance - Methods and Applications", is on the presentation of new methodological developments in magnetic resonance spectroscopy (NMR and EPR) and the Resonance Imaging (MRI). There will be sessions with the titles "New Methods", Computational Methods / Fast NMR "," EPR Methods "and" Hyperpolarization Methods ". In addition, the sessions ?Structural Biology? and ?Bio-Macromolecules and Dynamics? address biological issues in the applications. Other sessions will cover ?Small Molecules / Homogeneous Catalysis?, ?Soft Matter?, ?NMR Crystallography / Materials?, ?Magnetic Resonance Imaging? and ?Paramagnetic Systems?. For the first time there will be a session on the subject of "NMR relaxometry", a method that has gained significant momentum in recent years as relaxometers have become commercially available. The extensive program consists of five plenary sessions with twelve lectures and six parallel sessions with four lecturers each and reflects the great diversity of the MR area. Top-class and internationally recognized speakers from France and Germany could be won as speakers. The conference is therefore extremely attractive for the entire MR community for both countries and contributes to the development and perpetuation of international scientific contacts both between the conference participants and between the partner organizations. The Felix Bloch Lecture is named after one of the two founders of magnetic resonance spectroscopy. In 1952 he received the Nobel Prize in Physics for the discovery of nuclear magnetic resonance. Richard Ernst, who set an important milestone in the further development of NMR Spectroscopy , received the 1991 Nobel Prize in Chemistry for this. Felix Bloch Lecturer this year is Dr. Muslim Dvoyashkin from the University of Leipzig. The Ernst Awards are presented to Monu Kaushik (Johann Wolfgang Goethe University Frankfurt am Main), Artur Lozovoi (Technical University Ilmenau) and Matthias Roos (Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg). More information at: www.fgmr-gmrm-2017.uni-bayreuth.de The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the division Magnetic Resonance Spectroscopy with currently 475 members. The activities of the division include the annual discussion conference with contributions from all fields of magnetic resonance, various training and information events offered by the GDCh, as well as several special events that are organized by active members on special topics.

38 How vegan is soy schnitzel really?

 

Food chemists' day in Würzburg with various topics on consumer protection

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5th September 2017

The 46th German Food Chemists' Day of the Food Chemical Society (LChG) will take place from September 25th to 27th at the University of Würzburg. This time, the LChG, a division of the German Chemical Society (GDCh), is primarily devoting itself to consumer-related issues. How can you determine whether foods that have been declared as ?vegan? are actually vegan and whether a wine really comes from the specified growing area? More and more people in Germany are following a vegetarian or even vegan diet - they completely do without animal products. Accordingly, a large number of new products have come onto the market in recent years, from soy schnitzel and vegetable cheese substitutes to ?vegan? eggs. The legislature has now adopted legal definitions for vegan and vegetarian products that should be used as a basis for labeling food in the future. Dr. Ulrich Busch and colleagues from the Bavarian State Office for Health and Food Safety (LGL) present a method they have developed for checking the declaration of vegetarian and vegan products, which is already used in routine diagnostics. Regional products are also very popular with many consumers. In the case of wine and viticulture products, the indication of the geographical origin of the grapes is precisely regulated, including the location and municipality. In order to be able to monitor these declarations for the protection of the consumer, suitable analytical verification methods must be developed. Dr. Steffen Seifert from LGL presents a study in which 1H-NMR analysis was used as a method for checking authenticity. The scientists expect that in the future the specific information such as origin, grape variety or vintage as well as the aging of the grapes (organic, barrique, vegan) can be checked using this new technology. The public evening lecture on Monday, September 25th at 7 p.m. will also be about wine. Prof. Dr. Ulrich Fischer from the Service Center for Rural Areas (DLR), Rheinpfalz in Neustadt (Weinstrasse), speaks about "Wine - an expression of geographical and biological diversity". The lecture will take place in the Neubaukirche, the festival hall of the university, entrance via the inner courtyard, Domerschulstrasse 16, in 97070 Würzburg. Admission is free. Further information on the conference at www.gdch.de/lchtag2017 German Chemical Society (GDCh) With around 31,000 members, the GDCh is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world Food Chemistry Society, whose task it is to promote the exchange of ideas in the field of Food Chemistry and its related disciplines and to convey technical suggestions. With over 2,900 members, the Food Chemistry Society is the largest division in the GDCh. Food Chemistry at the Julius-Maximilians-Universität Würzburg The University of Würzburg, Founded in 1402, it is a comprehensive university with around 29,000 students. At her chair for Food Chemistry , under the direction of Prof. Dr. Leane Lehmann focuses on the influence of food ingredients on the development of cancer. Around ten people conduct research at the chair; On average, around 150 students are enrolled in the bachelor's and master's degree in food chemistry.

37 Chemistry is more than research!

37/17
5th September 2017

The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is celebrating its 150th anniversary this year with the Science Forum for Chemistry (WiFo). Chemists from all over the world, from doctoral students to Nobel Prize winners, use this opportunity to exchange ideas about their research. But the science forum also has other target groups in mind; Schoolchildren as well as start-ups, business representatives, investors or politicians: the GDCh will be addressing them with numerous special events on September 11 and 12, 2017 in Berlin-Dahlem. The spectrum of topics ranges from the science slam on chemistry to the experiment day for schoolchildren to the innovation marathon for business, politics and start-up entrepreneurs, to which Federal Economics Minister Brigitte Zypries has also agreed to attend. "Exchanging scientific findings is of course the main reason why chemists come to the Science Forum Chemistry in Berlin," says the President of the GDCh, Prof. Dr. Thisbe K. Lindhorst: ?But chemistry has close links with society far beyond pure research. This applies to school education as well as to the labor market and the efficiency of the economy. With the special events for the WiFo, we want to bring this fact closer to a large audience. ?As the coordinator of Entrepreneurship Education, Prof. Dr. Hannes Rothe students and researchers at the Free University of Berlin for the topic of business start-ups. As part of the WiFo, he is organizing a new event format: the ?Innovation marathon: the chemical revolution?. From Tuesday morning, September 12th, 10:30 am to Wednesday noon, researchers from chemistry, representatives from industry, the financial sector and politics will come together to develop ideas for a ?new start-up era in chemistry?, as Rothe says : ?A rethinking is currently taking place in chemistry. In the past, people only thought about a new product or process and its market opportunities. Today, researchers, developers, financiers and marketers have an eye on the entire product life cycle - from manufacture to disposal. We are talking about green chemistry. ?This green chemistry offers new perspectives and thus innovation potential and economic opportunities, adds Rothe:? With our innovation marathon, we want to make a contribution to making the potential of green chemistry a reality, start-ups favor and lead to new jobs. ?To make this happen, the event offers impulse lectures, 24-hour teamwork phases in the innovation marathon and a competition in which the best ideas are awarded. ?There is great interest in our marathon,? reports Rothe: ?Business representatives from the highest management levels have registered as well as financiers of company start-ups, so-called venture capitalists, or those willing to start a business.? Participation shows that the chemical turnaround is also attracting great political interest by Federal Minister of Economics Brigitte Zypries, who is a member of the jury of the innovation competition, and by Dr. Georg Schütte, State Secretary in the BMBF, who will take part in the panel discussion at the opening of the Innovation Marathon. In order for chemistry to be socially supported and for people to be enthusiastic about this subject at school and university, however, you have to start elsewhere than in business - at school. A whole series of events organized by the WiFo is therefore designed for schoolchildren. On the school day you can experiment yourself under the guidance of chemistry students. You can be inspired by the spectacular aspects of chemistry in the experimental lecture ?Louder, brighter, hotter?. Or learn in the Science Slam how to present dry science in a gripping and rousing manner. The complete program of special events at the Science Forum Chemistry can be found here. Media representatives are cordially invited to the events. Registration is requested. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of scientific knowledge. In 2017 the society celebrates its anniversary: 150 years ago August Wilhelm von Hofmann founded the German Chemical Society, the first predecessor organization of the GDCh in Berlin.

36 A memorial for the first professional society of German chemists

36/17
29th August 2017

The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is celebrating its 150th anniversary this year. In the middle of Berlin, on the square in front of the Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm Center of the Humboldt University, a commemorative plaque will draw attention to the fact that well-known chemists came to this place in November 1867 to join a specialist society - the Germans Chemical Society of Berlin - to merge. The plaque is dedicated to the founding president August Wilhelm von Hofmann (1818 - 1892). It will be ceremoniously unveiled on Sunday, September 10, 2017 at 12 noon in front of the building in Geschwister-Scholl-Strasse 1/3. All interested parties are cordially invited to the ceremony. ?Historic sites of chemistry? is the title of the program with which the GDCh has been publicly recognizing the places where important chemists work since 1999. ?I am very pleased that in the great anniversary year of the GDCh it is possible to actually hand over a plaque in honor of our founding president August Wilhelm von Hofmann at the place where the German Chemical Society 150 years ago - the addition 'zu Berlin 'fell away in 1876 - was founded ", says the President of the GDCh, Prof. Dr. Thisbe K. Lindhorst. ?With the establishment of the company, the chemists of the time made it clear that chemistry in Germany plays an important role in science and economy. They created a space for intensive scientific exchange, which has brought chemical research forward tremendously. ?? Founding President von Hofmann played a key role in this, ?emphasizes Professor Dr. Christoph Meinel, chairman of the GDCh division ?History of Chemistry?: He studied with Justus von Liebig and then headed the Royal Institute for Chemistry in London. In this capacity he was also President of the Chemical Society of London. He was therefore already very familiar with the management of a large specialist society before he became director of the Chemical University Institute in Berlin in 1865 and then also president of the German Chemical Society. ?At the same time, von Hofmann was a professional authority: Today he is considered to be an important pioneer of organic Chemistry, which made important contributions to the research of chemical synthesis pathways and ensured that basic chemical knowledge led to industrial chemical processes. The diorama of the brothers Ferdinand and George Gropius stood in the immediate vicinity of today's Jacob and Wilhelm Grimm Center in 1867. The representation of large natural and city views in the diorama enjoyed a large audience until 1850. After that, the diorama served as an exhibition building for the German Trade Museum. The German Chemical Society was founded in its assembly hall. In 1876 the building was demolished for the construction of the light rail. About the event The unveiling of the memorial plaque will take place on Sunday, September 10, 2017, at 12 noon on the square in front of the Jacob-und-Wilhelm-Grimm-Center of the Humboldt University Geschwister-Scholl-Straße 1/3, 10117 Berlin. The event is public. All interested parties are cordially invited. The ceremony is part of the GDCh Science Forum Chemistry 2017 on the occasion of the 150th anniversary of the GDCh. The complete program of the Science Forum is available online at https://www.wifo2017.de. About the ?Historic Chemistry Sites? program With the ?Historic Chemistry Sites? program, the German Chemical Society (GDCh) has been honoring achievements of historical importance in chemistry since 1999. Places of work of important scientists are honored in a ceremonial act as places of remembrance. The aim of this program is to keep the memory of the cultural heritage of chemistry alive and to bring chemistry and its historical roots more into the public eye. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of scientific knowledge. In 2017 the society celebrates its anniversary: 150 years ago August Wilhelm von Hofmann founded the German Chemical Society, the first predecessor organization of the GDCh in Berlin.

35 A fireworks display of chemical research

35/17
August 24, 2017

Numerous conferences and symposia of the GDCh specialist groups will take place as part of the Science Forum Chemistry 2017 of the German Chemical Society (GDCh) on September 12 and 13, 2017 at the Free University and in the Harnack House of the Max Planck Society in Berlin-Dahlem . The events cover the entire spectrum of modern chemistry - from school experiments and basic research to industrial applications. Scientists exchange their latest research results here, representatives from industrial research show the latest application-oriented research trends and active as well as prospective chemistry teachers receive impulses for modern design of chemistry lessons. Application-oriented approaches are discussed, for example, by the coating Coating Chemistry division , as its chairman Dr. Michael Hilt, Research Association for Pigments and Lacquers in Stuttgart, explains: ?In our division , materials for surface coating play an essential role. They are of great importance for industry because they are used to protect materials, for example against corrosion. Other coatings give surfaces new properties; they become self-cleaning or reduce the frictional resistance in aircraft and ships. ?Hilt emphasizes that a lot has happened in this area in recent times thanks to excellent research. "I look forward to the discussion of current trends in coating technology, the basic researchers and practitioners will result in our conference." This is a topic of great social relevance edited the division of Chemistry and Energy, as its Chairman Dr. Manfred Waidhas , Siemens AG, explains: ?A difficult problem is still how to Manfred Waidhas electricity from regenerative energy generation when it is not needed. At our 'Power to X' event, new technologies will be presented and discussed how this electricity can be diverted to other sectors - in particularly energy-intensive industries, for example, in which chemical processes for the production of fuels or ammonia take place. ?Effective catalysts are important for this, And so it is only logical that one of the most renowned German catalysis researchers is giving the opening lecture at the Chemistry and Energy conference: ?We were able to welcome Professor Dr. Robert Schlögl from the Fritz Haber Institute of the Max Planck Society for this task, ?Waidhas said happily,? a researcher who can present his science particularly pointedly and vividly. ?Professor Dr. Hans-Günther Schmalz, University of Cologne and chairman of the GDCh division on Chemical Education teaching, states that ? Chemical Education teaching has changed significantly over the past few decades. Today, knowledge of chemistry is placed much more strongly in the life context of schoolchildren than it used to be. What are the ingredients of food or personal care products and what is their chemistry? What are Nanomaterials and where are they used? With such questions you can reach the students much better than with mere formula drumming. ?In order for this approach to succeed, however, new didactic concepts are necessary, which must also be compatible with the curricula of the federal states. ?Corresponding concepts will be presented and discussed at our specialist group conference as part of the science forum,? says Schmalz: ?Experience has shown that we have met with great interest from teachers as well as student teachers and didactic researchers doing research.? One of the highlights is the experimental lectures. New approaches will be demonstrated how Chemical Education can be enriched with safe and easily comprehensible demonstration experiments on current research topics such as luminous materials. In addition to these exemplary highlights, numerous other specialist groups will meet at the Science Forum 2017. "We have established seven focus areas, from the History of Chemistry to Analytical Chemistry and chemistry in the life sciences," says GDCh managing director Professor Dr. Wolfram Koch: ?There is something exciting here for everyone who is interested in chemistry.? About the event The conferences and symposia of the GDCh specialist groups will take place on Tuesday, September 12th and Wednesday, September 13th, 2017 8:30 a.m. all day in lecture halls and in the Henry Ford Building of the Free University of Berlin, Garystraße 35, Fabeckstraße. 34-36 and Takustr. 3, 14195 Berlin, as well as in the Harnack House of the Max Planck Society, Ihnestr. 16-20, 14195 Berlin. The events are part of the Science Forum for Chemistry from September 10th to 14th, during which numerous other scientific events take place, for example a symposium of the GDCh journal "Angewandte Chemie" and the symposium "Experiment Future - Value Thinking in Chemistry". Further information and registration at www.wifo2017.de. Media representatives are cordially invited. Interviews with the speakers are possible by appointment. Please register as a media representative at: GDCh, public relations, pr@gdch.de, Tel. 069 7917-327 or -493 The complete program is available online at https://www.wifo2017.de/tms/frontend/index .cfm? l = 7210 & sp_id = 1 & selSiteID = sciprog_v2 The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with around 31,000 members. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of scientific knowledge. In 2017 the society celebrates its anniversary: 150 years ago August Wilhelm von Hofmann founded the German Chemical Society, the first predecessor organization of the GDCh in Berlin.

34 Bundestag election 2017: polling the parties on science policy

Joint press release
the umbrella association of geosciences (DVGeo),
the German Mathematicians Association (DMV),
the German Physical Society (DPG),
the German Chemical Society (GDCh) and
of the Association of Biology, Biosciences and Biomedicine in Germany (VBIO)


34/17
18th August 2017

In the run-up to the Bundestag election, the major mathematical and scientific societies presented so-called ?election test stones? to all parties represented in the German Bundestag and in the state parliaments. This joint action is intended to document the fundamental scientific and political ideas of the respective parties. The parties' answers can be found at www.bundestagswahl.naturwissenschaften.mathematik.de. The umbrella association of geosciences (DVGeo), the German Mathematicians Association (DMV), the German Physical Society (DPG), the German Chemical Society (GDCh) and the Association of Biology, Biosciences and Biomedicine in Germany (VBIO) have the parties one Catalog of questions presented in which they ask them about their plans on selected topics from research, education, climate protection and the energy transition. The professional societies want to give their more than 130,000 members an instrument to find out about the scientific policy approaches of the parties up for election. The major mathematical and scientific societies deliberately refrain from commenting, because the ?election test stones? are not intended to be a recommendation for election, but rather enable members to incorporate the scientific and political ideas of the individual parties into their voting decision. Further information is available from the participating professional associations: ? Umbrella Association of Geosciences eV (DVGeo): PD Dr. Klaus-Dieter Grevel, Secretary, Tel .: 030 209398986; Email: info@dvgeo.org ? German Mathematicians Association (DMV): Thomas Vogt, Press Officer, Tel .: 030 83875657, E-Mail: medienbuero@mathematik.de ? German Physical Society (DPG): Gerhard Samulat, Press Office, Tel .: 02224 923233, E-Mail: presse@dpg-physik.de ? German Chemical Society (GDCh): Dr. Karin J. Schmitz, Head of Public Relations, Tel .: 069 7917-493, E-Mail: pr@gdch.de ? Association of Biology, Biosciences and Biomedicine in Germany (VBIO): Dr. Kerstin Elbing, Science & Society, Tel .: 030 27891916, E-Mail: elbing@vbio.de With around 31,000 members, the German Chemical Society is the largest chemical science society in continental Europe. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of new scientific knowledge, also through transdisciplinary and international cooperation. The GDCh is also committed to up-to-date basic and advanced training in schools, universities and in the professional environment. Note: an abridged version of the answers can be found in the September issue of the Nachrichten aus der Chemie

33 A day with numerous Nobel Prize winners

33/17
15th August 2017

The festival symposium of the journal ?Angewandte Chemie? as part of the 150th anniversary of the German Chemical Society on September 11, 2017 attracts excellent speakers. Ben Feringa, Bob Grubbs, WE Moerner, Jack Szostak - these four Nobel Prize winners top the list of speakers at the ?Angewandte Festsymposium? of the journal ?Angewandte Chemie?. Besides them, other world-leading scientists from Europe, Asia and America will speak about their latest findings at the symposium. The event will take place on September 11, 2017 as part of the Science Forum Chemistry 2017 of the German Chemical Society (GDCh) in the Henry Ford Building of the Free University of Berlin. The GDCh celebrates its 150th anniversary with the forum. Media representatives are cordially invited. "With our symposium we want to show the interested public what range of topics chemistry covers today," says Dr. Peter Gölitz, long-time editor-in-chief of the GDCh magazine ?Angewandte Chemie? and significantly involved in organizing the symposium: ?We are delighted that we have succeeded in attracting such high-ranking speakers in connection with the GDCh's 150th anniversary. They will show us where the front line of chemical research is currently taking place. ?The speakers will report on the latest findings from basic research as well as on application-oriented results, for example in the development of nanostructures and innovative technologies in pharmaceutical research. Lectures on the chemical origins of life are a focal point: The winner of the 2009 Nobel Prize for Medicine, Professor Dr. Jack Szostak, will speak about his current research on the question of how chemical molecules multiplied in the pre-phase of life - before the step to a living organism was successful. So far it has not been possible for researchers to reproduce this step in a test tube. Szostak promises to provide insights into the progress he has made with his team in this direction. Professor Dr. Petra Schwille, Director at the Max Planck Institute for Biochemistry in Martinsried near Munich. Their approach is to take a bottom-up approach to understanding life. From observing simple biological subsystems - such as membrane proteins - in a standardized, but as close to life environment as possible, she derives fundamental theories of how chemistry can have succeeded in making the transition to life. In her lecture ?How simple could life be?, Schwille will talk about her findings on this topic. In addition to purely scientific knowledge, the festival symposium will also be about science policy: Jürgen Kaube, co-editor of the Frankfurter Allgemeine Zeitung, explores the question of how research is influenced when science is faced with politically motivated major challenges - in other words, "grand challenges" such as combating climate change or securing food supplies. ?The program of the Applied Festival Symposium is a highlight at our WiFo 2017 for everyone who is interested in the state of chemical research and the importance of chemistry for our world,? says the President of the GDCh, Professor Thisbe K. Lindhorst: ?Here you can see the thought world-leading research personalities in a very compressed form to meet. "About the event the" Applied hard Symposium "is organized by the German Chemical Society (GDCh), hosted by their science journal"Angewandte Chemie", as part of the Science Forum 2017 GDCh on the occasion of its 150th anniversary. It will take place on Monday, September 11, 2017 from 8:30 a.m. all day in the Henry Ford Building of the Free University of Berlin, Garystraße 35, 14195 Berlin. Registration for the Science Forum and the Applied Festival Symposium at www.wifo2017.de. Media representatives are cordially invited. Interviews with the speakers are possible by appointment. The lecture language is predominantly English. Please register as a media representative at pr@gdch.de. The complete program and more about the transmission of the lectures on the Internet (livestream and media library) can be found here. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of scientific knowledge. In 2017 the society celebrates its anniversary: 150 years ago August Wilhelm von Hofmann founded the German Chemical Society, the first predecessor organization of the GDCh in Berlin.

32 A better world is possible

Symposium "Experiment Future - Value Thinking in Chemistry"


32/17
August 8, 2017

What contribution can chemistry make to preserving our livelihoods on earth? What responsibility do chemists have in shaping this future? The German Chemical Society (GDCh) will discuss these and other fundamental questions with experts and laypeople on September 14th in Berlin at its symposium "Experiment Future - Value Thinking in Chemistry". "We want to bring new approaches to the debate about the role chemistry and science in general play in our world," says the President of the GDCh, Professor Dr. Thisbe K. Lindhorst. The event is embedded in the GDCh Science Forum Chemistry 2017, with which the specialist society is celebrating its 150th anniversary. ?The assumption that nature will fix it is no longer valid today,? Thisbe Lindhorst explains, explaining the motivation for the unusual discussion event: ?In the past 200 years, we humans have had such a strong impact on our planet that our livelihoods are in danger . That is why we now have to ensure that we and future generations have a good future. ?The GDCh President added that there was more to this than just taking the scientific perspective into account:? We have to think much more about the ethical dimension of our research. A new set of values in science - in our case in chemistry - is necessary for us to succeed in the experiment in the future. ?This approach is to be brought to life by a new concept that the GDCh developed for the symposium: First, representatives give out Science, economy and society impulses on the four subject areas ?War and Peace?, ?Poor and Rich?, ?Life and Death? and ?Full and Hungry?. In doing so, different positions should be worked out, which also shed a critical light on the role of chemistry. Thisbe Lindhorst: ?The topic of war and peace is about chemical weapons, for example: chemists were involved in their development; others - also within the framework of the GDCh - campaigned for the ban on chemical weapons for many years. We want to use examples like this to demonstrate how ethical and philosophical approaches influence our research and help chemists to live up to their responsibilities. ?Following the keynote speeches, the approximately 200 guests at the symposium from science, industry, politics and civil society are invited to participate in the discussion. The common goal: a vision for a value-led and responsible chemistry of the future. ?We hope that non-chemists will also make valuable contributions here,? says Lindhorst: ?We want to work out a final communiqué together, as a basis for further social discussion about the role of chemical research in shaping the future. I am firmly convinced that a better future is possible - and that chemistry can make a contribution to it. ?The symposium? Experiment Future - Value Thinking in Chemistry ?is under the patronage of the Federal Minister for Education and Research, Professor Dr. Johanna Wanka. The event will take place on September 14, 2014 from 9 a.m. in the Spreespeicher, Stralauer Allee 2 in Berlin. Media representatives are cordially invited to attend the symposium. Registration at pr@gdch.de is required. To the complete program The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world with around 31,000 members. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of scientific knowledge. In 2017 the society celebrates its anniversary: 150 years ago August Wilhelm von Hofmann founded the German Chemical Society, the first predecessor organization of the GDCh in Berlin.

31 Simon Schaffer receives Paul Bunge Prize

31/17
3rd August 2017

As part of the Science Forum Chemistry 2017 (WiFo) in Berlin, Professor Dr. Simon Schaffer, University of Cambridge, UK, was awarded the Paul Bunge Prize of the Hans R. Jenemann Foundation on September 12th. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) and the German Bunsen Society for Physical Chemistry (DBG), who jointly award the prize, honor Schaffer's outstanding work on the history of scientific instruments. Schaffer receives the award for his book Leviathan and the Air-Pump: Hobbes, Boyle, and the Experimental Life as well as for his life's work and the enormous impetus that modern instrument history owes to it. Schaffer is one of the world's most cited and influential historians of science. His Leviathan and the Air-Pump, which he wrote together with Stephen Shapin in 1985, is considered to be the first work in which an instrument, the vacuum pump, appears to a certain extent as a separate actor and thus structures complex natural-philosophical and social networks. Born in Southampton, UK in 1955, Schaffer studied at the University of Cambridge, UK, and Harvard University, Cambridge, Massachusetts, USA. After receiving his doctorate in 1980, he taught history of science at the University of California, Los Angeles, USA, and since 1985 at the University of Cambridge. In 2013, Schaffer received the George Sarton Medal from the History of Science Society (HSS). Further information on WiFo is available at www.wifo2017.de. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of scientific knowledge. In 2017 the society celebrates its anniversary: 150 years ago August Wilhelm von Hofmann founded the German Chemical Society, the first predecessor organization of the GDCh in Berlin.

30 Wilhelm Klemm Prize to Hansjörg Grützmacher

30/17
August 1, 2017

Professor Dr. Hansjörg Grützmacher, ETH Zurich, will receive the Wilhelm-Klemm-Prize at the Science Forum Chemistry 2017 (WiFo) on September 12th in Berlin. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) honors his outstanding achievements in the field of inorganic chemistry. Grützmacher receives the award for his extremely original work, with which he enriches inorganic molecular chemistry in a variety of ways. His research reflects his extraordinary synthetic chemistry and conceptual creativity. In addition to highly reactive small molecules from main group element chemistry, he provides creative approaches for organometallic catalysis and focuses on current innovations in fuel cells. Grützmacher was born in Hamburg in 1959. After studying chemistry and completing his doctorate at the University of Göttingen, he spent a post-doctoral year at the National Center for Scientific Research (CNRS) in Toulouse, France. After his habilitation in 1992 at the University of Heidelberg, he worked at the University of Freiburg as a professor of inorganic chemistry. Since 1995 he has been Professor of Inorganic Chemistry at the ETH Zurich. Further information on WiFo is available at www.wifo2017.de. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of scientific knowledge. In 2017 the society celebrates its anniversary: 150 years ago August Wilhelm von Hofmann founded the German Chemical Society, the first predecessor organization of the GDCh in Berlin.

Hansjörg Grützmacher

29 Konrad Hungerbühler receives the 2017 Wöhler Prize for Sustainable Chemistry


29/17
July 27, 2017

Professor Dr. Konrad Hungerbühler, ETH Zurich, will receive the Wöhler Prize for Sustainable Chemistry at the Science Forum Chemistry 2017 (WiFo) on September 13 in Berlin. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) honors his groundbreaking and outstanding contributions to the development and implementation of sustainable chemistry. Hungerbühler receives the award for the development of tools and methods with which chemical processes can be improved ecologically, economically and with regard to process reliability. These include methods with which the sustainability of reactions and chemicals is assessed. Hungerbühler was born in Zurich in 1952. After studying chemistry and completing his doctorate at ETH Zurich, he started his successful Career in the chemical industry at Ciba Geigy in 1979. Since his appointment in 1994, Hungerbühler has been Professor of Environmental and Safety Technology in the Department of Chemistry and Applied Biosciences at ETH Zurich. Further information on WiFo is available at www.wifo2017.de. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of scientific knowledge. In 2017 the society celebrates its anniversary: 150 years ago August Wilhelm von Hofmann founded the German Chemical Society, the first predecessor organization of the GDCh in Berlin.

Konrad Hungerbühler

28 Jan Klett receives the Arfvedson Schlenk Prize

28/17
July 25, 2017

On September 12th, Dr. Jan Klett, Johannes Gutenberg University Mainz, was awarded the Arfvedson Schlenk Prize at the Science Forum Chemistry 2017 (WiFo) in Berlin. The prize donated by the Albemarle company is awarded jointly with the German Chemical Society (GDCh). The award winner Klett receives the award for his outstanding work in the field of lithium chemistry. The GDCh and Albemarle are honoring Klett's remarkable contributions to the organometallic chemistry of alkali metals. With these findings, significant gaps in the understanding of so-called Lochmann-Schlosser superbases are closed. His representation of these soluble and thus easily characterizable alkali metal compounds is one of the most important developments in main group organometallic chemistry in recent years. Klett was born in Schorndorf in 1974. After studying chemistry at the University of Stuttgart, he received his doctorate in 2006 from the Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz. After research stays at the University of Strathclyde, Glasgow, and the Georg-August University in Göttingen, he is now a habilitation candidate and research assistant at the Johannes Gutenberg University in Mainz. Further information on WiFo is available at www.wifo2017.de. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of scientific knowledge. In 2017 the society celebrates its anniversary: 150 years ago August Wilhelm von Hofmann founded the German Chemical Society, the first predecessor organization of the GDCh in Berlin.

27 Heinz Schmidkunz Prize for Marco Oetken

27/17
20th July 2017

As part of the Science Forum Chemistry 2017 (WiFo) in Berlin, Professor Dr. Marco Oetken, Freiburg University of Education, received the Heinz Schmidkunz Prize on September 12th. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) awards the award for special services to research in chemistry education, the training of chemistry teachers and Chemical Education in schools. Oetken receives the award for his numerous innovative experiments and didactic concepts that are based on his broad knowledge of chemistry as a whole. Among other things, he is known for his experiments on battery systems, which, in the context of the energy transition, attract a lot of attention from schoolchildren as well as interest from specialist scientists and technologists. Oetken is not only interested in secondary education, but also, for example, in the further training of primary school teachers. In addition, he supervises a considerable number of doctorates and works as an editor of books and magazines. Marco Oetken studied chemistry and Biology for teaching at grammar schools at the Carl von Ossietzky University of Oldenburg. After the 1st state examination, he received his doctorate in chemistry there in 1997. After completing the 2nd state examination, he also completed his habilitation in Oldenburg and taught at the Weingarten University of Education and the University of Wuppertal. Oetken has been a professor at the Freiburg University of Education since 2004, and has been professor of chemistry and its didactics since 2012. Further information on WiFo is available at www.wifo2017.de. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of scientific knowledge. In 2017 the society celebrates its anniversary: 150 years ago August Wilhelm von Hofmann founded the German Chemical Society, the first predecessor organization of the GDCh in Berlin.

Preisträger Marco Oetken

23 Otto Hahn Prize 2017 goes to gravitational wave researcher Karsten Danzmann

23/17
July 13, 2017

JOINT PRESS RELEASE of the City of Frankfurt am Main of the German Chemical Society e. V. (GDCh) and the German Physical Society e. V. (DPG) The Otto Hahn Prize, endowed with 50,000 euros and jointly sponsored by the City of Frankfurt am Main, the German Chemical Society (GDCh) and the German Physical Society (DPG), will be presented this year on November 2nd in the Paulskirche in Frankfurt to Prof. Dr. Karsten Danzmann awarded. The director at the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics and professor at the Leibniz Universität Hannover is considered one of the pioneers in the discovery of gravitational waves. "Danzmann's work on innovative interferometer systems with highly stable laser sources, signal-amplifying interferometer topologies and seismically extremely decoupled, ultra-precise laser mirrors created the experimental conditions for the LIGO detectors in the USA to be able to directly detect gravitational waves for the first time on September 14, 2015", Prof. Dr. Thisbe Lindhorst, President of the German Chemical Society and Prof. Dr. Rolf-Dieter Heuer, President of the German Physical Society. "The city of Frankfurt is proud to promote the scientific life of the Federal Republic of Germany with the Otto Hahn Prize and is thus committed to one of the city's greatest sons," emphasizes Peter Feldmann, Lord Mayor of Frankfurt am Main. The first gravitational waves measured by the LIGO detectors came from two black holes with 29 and 36 solar masses, respectively, which collided about 1.3 billion light years from Earth. In the meantime, these instruments have been able to prove further events. Gravitational waves reveal themselves exclusively through extremely small changes in length in space, which even when extremely massive black holes collide on the measuring section of the LIGO detectors of four kilometers in length are only about a thousandth of the diameter of a hydrogen atom nucleus. The enormous precision was made possible, among other things, by laser interferometry, which the team around Karsten Danzmann developed over decades and tested, for example, in the German-British detector GEO600 near Hanover. "The Otto Hahn Prize honors the technological development made on the GEO600 gravitational wave detector for the LIGO detectors," says the laureate. ?I'm very happy about that.? With the GEO600 interferometer he designed, Germany is at the forefront of global development in this important field of experimental physics. He and his team are currently working on further increasing the sensitivity of the detection devices. In addition, many of the technologies developed by Danzmann and his team are now being used in practice in other areas, for example in earth surveying satellites or in data communication. Furthermore, he is the spiritual father and driving pioneer of the gravitational wave detector LISA (Laser Interferometer Space Antenna). From 2034, this detector, which will consist of three satellites, is expected to orbit around 50 million kilometers from Earth. The space probes form a laser interferometer with arm lengths of several million kilometers. This space detector is particularly sensitive to gravitational waves from extremely massive black holes, which can be found in the centers of most galaxies. In preparation for this experiment, the LISA Pathfinder probe was recently successfully launched into space. The internationally highly regarded pioneer of gravitational wave research is characterized by a very extensive scientific work with numerous publications of the highest quality. In addition to his extraordinary achievements as a scientist, Karsten Danzmann is also a highly valued university professor who passionately promotes young people and gives lectures for beginners in Physics with great commitment. He also gives numerous, easy-to-understand lectures for the general public, building bridges between science and society. Karsten Danzmann was born on February 6, 1955 in Rotenburg an der Wümme. His scientific career began in Hanover and Berlin. At the age of 25 he received his doctorate from the Physics department of the University of Hanover. In 1986 he went to Stanford University to do research in the field of atomic and ion physics. In 1990 he took over the project management for gravitational wave detectors at the Max Planck Institute for Quantum Optics in Garching. Since 1993 Danzmann has been a professor at the Leibniz University of Hanover and since 2002 director of the Max Planck Institute for Gravitational Physics, which is also called the Albert Einstein Institute. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of scientific knowledge. In 2017 the society celebrates its anniversary: 150 years ago August Wilhelm von Hofmann founded the German Chemical Society, the first predecessor organization of the GDCh in Berlin. The Otto Hahn Prize is jointly awarded by the City of Frankfurt, the German Physical Society (DPG) and the GDCh. It serves to promote science in particular in the fields of chemistry, Physics and applied engineering by recognizing outstanding scientific achievements. It is endowed with 50,000 euros and is awarded every two years with a ceremony in Frankfurt's Paulskirche.

Karsten Danzmann

26 Bernhard Spengler receives Fresenius Prize

26/17
6th July 2017

On September 12th, Professor Dr. Bernhard Spengler, Justus Liebig University Gießen, was awarded the Fresenius Prize at the Science Forum Chemistry 2017 (WiFo) in Berlin. The German Chemical Society (GDCh) honors his special services to the scientific development and the promotion of analytical chemistry. Spengler receives the award for his excellent research work on mass spectroscopy, with which he has significantly advanced analytical chemistry as an exact science with high informative value in life science applications. His great commitment to scientific development and the promotion of analytical chemistry is also recognized. As a long-standing member of the board of the Society for Mass Spectroscopy, Spengler contributed to its development into a scientific association of outstanding international standing. At the same time, as chairman of the Justus Liebig Society, he is committed to the operation and further development of the Liebig Museum in Giessen. Spengler was born in Hattingen in 1960. After studying chemistry at the University of Bonn, he received his doctorate in 1988 from the University of Münster and completed his habilitation in 1996 at the Heinrich Heine University in Düsseldorf. Since 2000 Spengler has been Professor of Analytical Chemistry and Managing Director of the Institute for Inorganic and Analytical Chemistry at the Justus Liebig University of Giessen. Further information on WiFo is available at www.wifo2017.de. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of scientific knowledge. In 2017 the society celebrates its anniversary: 150 years ago August Wilhelm von Hofmann founded the German Chemical Society, the first predecessor organization of the GDCh in Berlin.

25 New statistics for chemistry courses published

Number of beginners declining, doctorates at their highest level

25/17
4th July 2017

In 2016, the number of beginners in chemistry fell for the first time since 2012. Despite the slight decrease, the total number of first-year students was 11,311 * in the sixth year and over 10,000. At the same time, the number of graduates (masters and diplomas) in all subjects (chemistry, Biochemistry, Food Chemistry) and at the universities of applied sciences (HAW) rose. This is reported by the German Chemical Society (GDCh) in its annual statistics on chemistry courses. For 65 years (since 1952) the GDCh has been collecting extensive statistical data on chemistry courses every year. This year, the data for 2016 was queried in the chemistry, business chemistry, Biochemistry/ life sciences, Food Chemistry and chemistry courses at the Universities of Applied Sciences (HAW), formerly universities of applied sciences. The number of beginners, the number of final exams passed, as well as the respective grades and duration of study were recorded. In addition, many universities provided information on the career entry of their graduates after completing their degree or doctorate. In chemistry, the universities reported 2484 Bachelor and 2297 Master graduates. 2,028 people graduated in chemistry in 2016. The duration of the doctorate was around four years. In Biochemistry , 814 Bachelor and 751 Master graduates were registered, plus 239 doctorates. At HAW, 894 students completed their bachelor's and 482's master's degree. In Food Chemistry , 370 people completed the main examination A or the diploma examination. 129 students passed the main examination part B. In addition, the universities reported 174 bachelor and 73 master degrees and 56 doctorates. Almost all Bachelor graduates at universities went on to study for a Master?s degree. At the HAW, this proportion was 56%. Around 83% of university master?s graduates started a doctorate. This is the third year that this value is below the long-term average (90%). The next few years will show whether this is a new trend and whether more graduates without a doctorate will start their careers in the future. The total number of doctorates has increased again due to the overall increase in the number of graduates and has thus reached the highest value in the last 10 years. 55% of graduates with a doctorate in chemistry are aware of their first step into professional life. Accordingly, entry into the labor market was difficult for young professionals in 2016 as well. According to the universities, 33% of the newly graduated chemists were hired in the chemical and pharmaceutical industry, 10% took up positions in the rest of the economy. 13% initially went abroad after completing their doctorate, in most cases for a postdoc stay. 19% started in an initially temporary position in Germany (including postdocs). This value has been relatively high for a number of years and is an indicator of the difficult labor market situation. Five percent found employment in other areas of the public service. 14.5% were temporarily looking for a job - also due to the time of the survey. The brochure ?Chemistry Courses in Germany - Statistical Data 2016? is available as a pdf at www.gdch.de/statistik. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. Among other things, she deals with current developments at universities and on the labor market. The GDCh determines annually (reference date: December 31st) information on the number of students in the various study sections, the exams taken and the length of study. The information is provided to the GDCh by the chemistry departments of the universities. * In an earlier version of the press release, the number 11,168 was incorrectly mentioned. We apologize for this mistake.

Abb.1 : Anfängerzahlen in den Chemiestudiengängen
Abb.2 : Promotionen im Studiengang Diplom-Chemie

24 Adolf von Baeyer commemorative coin to Peter Schreiner

Gießen organic chemist is honored at the Science Forum Chemistry.

24/17
4th July 2017

Professor Dr. Peter R. Schreiner, Justus Liebig University Gießen, will receive the Adolf von Baeyer Memorial Coin on September 13th in Berlin as part of the Science Forum Chemistry 2017 (WiFo). The German Chemical Society (GDCh) honors his excellent work in the field of organic chemistry. Schreiner receives the award for his research successes as well as his globally recognized contributions to physical-organic chemistry and catalysis. The importance of the chemist's scientific knowledge extends far beyond physical-organic chemistry to biological processes. With his work, Schreiner also showed new ways in the synthesis of drugs and is one of the pioneers in the field of organocatalysis. Schreiner was born in Nuremberg in 1965. After studying chemistry at the University of Erlangen-Nuremberg and the University of Georgia, Athens (USA), he received his doctorate in organic chemistry in Erlangen and in theoretical chemistry in Athens in 1994. Schreiner has been Professor of Organic Chemistry at the Justus Liebig University in Giessen since 2002. He conducts research in the field of metal-free catalysis, nanodiamonds and quantum mechanical tunneling to develop and improve sustainable chemical methods. Further information on WiFo is available at www.wifo2017.de. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of scientific knowledge. In 2017 the society celebrates its anniversary: 150 years ago August Wilhelm von Hofmann founded the German Chemical Society, the first predecessor organization of the GDCh in Berlin.

22 Matthias Beller receives Karl Ziegler Prize

22/17
June 27, 2017

As part of the Science Forum Chemistry 2017 (WiFo) of the German Chemical Society (GDCh), Professor Dr. Matthias Beller, Leibniz Institute for Catalysis at the University of Rostock, honored with the Karl Ziegler Prize on September 11th. He receives the award during the Applied Festival Symposium, which is part of this year's WiFo. With Beller, the Karl Ziegler Prize is awarded to a great catalytic scientist who has significantly shaped organometallic catalysis over the past 20 years. He discovered a number of useful and industry-friendly transformations that enable the development of sustainable syntheses. In addition, the award recognizes his achievement in expanding the Leibniz Institute for Catalysis in Rostock into an internationally renowned institute with great success. Beller was born in Gudensberg, Hesse, in 1962 and studied chemistry at the Georg-August University in Göttingen, where he earned his doctorate in 1989. At the Massachusetts Institute of Technology, Cambridge, USA, he completed a postdoctoral degree with Professor Dr. K. Barry Sharpless. Between 1991 and 1995 Beller worked at Hoechst AG in Frankfurt am Main until he was appointed Professor of Chemistry at the Technical University of Munich in 1996. Since June 1998 he has been director of the Leibniz Institute for Catalysis and holds a professorship for catalysis at the University of Rostock. Beller has already received numerous awards and honors, including the Emil Fischer Medal of the GDCh. The Karl Ziegler Prize is one of the most highly endowed German awards in the field of chemistry and has been awarded nine times since 1998. It is named after the founding president of the GDCh and winner of the 1963 Nobel Prize in Chemistry, Karl Ziegler. The prize is endowed with 50,000 euros and a gold medal and is funded by a foundation that Ziegler's daughter, Marianne Witte, set up at the GDCh. Further information is available at www.wifo2017.de The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. Its most important conference is the biannual Science Forum Chemistry, which will take place in Berlin from September 10th to 14th in 2017. The award ceremonies are one of the highlights of the Science Forum. At 50,000 euros, the Karl Ziegler Prize is the GDCh's highest endowed prize alongside the Otto Hahn Prize. It was first awarded in 1998 from funds from the Karl Ziegler Foundation to Gerhard Ertl, the 2007 Nobel Prize winner.

21 Neville Compton takes over editor-in-chief of Angewandte Chemie from Peter Gölitz

21/17
June 21, 2017

The German Chemical Society (GDCh) and Wiley-VCH announce that Dr. Neville Compton will take over as editor-in-chief of Angewandte Chemie on October 1, 2017. Angewandte Chemie, the flagship of the GDCh journals, appears weekly in the 129th year in the German and in the 56th year in the international edition. The journal publishes articles from all areas of chemistry and related sciences. In 2016 almost 2,700 original articles and around 150 essays and comments were published; in addition, the magazine has a diverse magazine section. All of these characteristics make Angewandte Chemie one of the world's leading scientific journals - and not just in chemistry. Dr. Neville Compton studied chemistry at the University of Newcastle Upon Tyne, did research as a postdoctoral fellow at the University of Heidelberg and joined the editorial team of Angewandte Chemie in 1992 at the age of 27. In 1997 he became deputy editor-in-chief and in 2002 also editor-in-chief of Chemistry - A European Journal. Under Neville Compton's direction, Chemistry - A European Journal has become one of the most important chemistry journals of all. Chemistry - A European Journal is the main journal of ChemPubSoc Europe, an association of 16 European chemical societies. After 37 years of work for Angewandte Chemie, including 35 years as editor-in-chief, Dr. Peter Gölitz retires. Under his leadership, Angewandte Chemie from a national to a leading international journal; Most of the published contributions in 2016 came from the USA, China, Germany and Japan. Peter Gölitz shaped the magazine by attracting top authors from all over the world and opening up for magazine-like articles. " Angewandte Chemie had long been the showcase in which chemists from Germany exhibited their best results when I took over as editor-in-chief in 1982," says Peter Gölitz. "It was a pleasure to develop it into a platform for authors from all over the world; I am sure that Neville Compton will give Angewandte Chemie new impetus and further strengthen its position in a competitive environment. ?Neville Compton:? It is a great honor to be able to take on this position at the flagship journal of the German Chemical Society . The GDCh and Angewandte Chemie are both highly respected worldwide, and I will do everything in my power, together with the Board of trustees and the Editorial Team, to increase their reputation even further. We will ensure that Angewandte Chemie remains the best place in the world for excellent chemistry by internationally leading authors. ?Prof. Thisbe K. Lindhorst, President of the GDCh, emphasizes:? The GDCh board of directors has decided with great enthusiasm that the Appointment of Dr. Compton to succeed Dr. Gölitz to agree. With Angewandte Chemie, we will continue to lead the international chemical journals and set standards. We are delighted that we can honor the change at the GDCh's 150th anniversary celebration in Berlin in September. "GDCh Managing Director Prof. Wolfram Koch adds:" With Dr. Compton has found an editor-in-chief who cultivates the strengths of Angewandte Chemie and, thanks to his experience in building Chemistry - A European Journal, will certainly open up new avenues that will make the journal more attractive than ever to readers all over the world. ?Guido Herrmann, Vice President and CEO Wiley-VCH: ?Neville Compton is one of the most experienced editors-in-chief and manager of scientific chemistry journals in the world. Under his leadership, Angewandte Chemie will be able to further expand its position as the leading journal in chemistry. " The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of scientific knowledge. In 2017 the society celebrates its anniversary: 150 years ago August Wilhelm von Hofmann founded the German Chemical Society, the first predecessor organization of the GDCh in Berlin. Wiley-VCH, founded in 1921 as Verlag Chemie, among others by the German Chemical Society, can look back on over 90 years of tradition. The publishing program covers many areas of the natural sciences - such as chemistry, materials and life sciences, Physics, Medicine and technology - as well as the area of business. Since 1996 Wiley-VCH has been part of the worldwide publishing group John Wiley & Sons, Inc. based in Hoboken, New Jersey, USA. Wiley, a global company, helps people and organizations develop the skills and knowledge they need to succeed. Our online scientific, technical, medical, and scholarly journals, combined with our digital learning, assessment and certification solutions help universities, learned societies, businesses, governments and individuals increase the academic and professional impact of their work. For more than 200 years, we have delivered consistent performance to our stakeholders. The company's website can be accessed at www.wiley.com.

Dr. Neville Compton

20 Primo Levi Prize is awarded for the first time

20/17
June 6, 2017

As part of the Science Forum Chemistry 2017 (WiFo) of the German Chemical Society (GDCh), Professor Dr. Roald Hoffmann awarded the Primo Levi Prize on September 10th. He receives the award, which is carried out by the GDCh together with the Italian Chemical Society (SCI), at the opening ceremony of WiFo 2017 in the Konzerthaus am Gendarmenmarkt in Berlin. The Primo Levi Prize commemorates the Italian writer and chemist who was deported to Auschwitz as a Jewish resistance fighter and survived. Levi is considered an important representative of the Holocaust literature. His works are dedicated to the memory of the victims and turn against oblivion. The newly created Primo Levi Prize honors chemists or scientists from chemical-related disciplines who are particularly committed to protecting human rights and thus promoting the dialogue between chemistry and society. The first prize winner is the Nobel Prize laureate in chemistry, Professor Dr. Roald Hoffmann, Cornell, USA. Hoffmann, himself of Jewish descent, had directly experienced the Holocaust in his childhood. He advocates compliance with ethical principles in chemistry. In addition to his outstanding scientific work, he writes extraordinary philosophical, ethical and poetic works that teach recipients responsibility, respect and empathy for one another. Following the award ceremony, Hoffmann will give a plenary lecture. More information at www.wifo2017.de The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of scientific knowledge. In 2017 the society celebrates its anniversary: 150 years ago August Wilhelm von Hofmann founded the German Chemical Society, the first predecessor organization of the GDCh in Berlin.

19 Strengthen education in chemistry

Recommendations for the orientation level (grades 5 and 6)


19/17
May 31, 2017

The German Chemical Society has published the brochure ?Discussion results and recommendations from the closed conference 'Strengthening chemistry lessons in school classes 5 and 6'?. In addition to an analysis of the current situation in the orientation stage at schools in Germany, it contains recommendations on how to bridge the gap between an early enthusiasm for chemistry and specialist teaching. At the invitation of the GDCh, experts from ministries of culture and representatives from industry, associations and universities came together for a closed conference in September last year. At the Protestant Academy in Tutzing, they discussed how to increase interest in chemistry in school. After two days of intensive group work, the participants agreed on the following recommendations:

     

  • Allocate the number of hours between Biology, chemistry and Physics .
  • Avoid long interruptions in chemistry classes, e.g. by switching between the natural sciences chemistry and Physics .
  • Ensure that chemistry lessons in the orientation level can be connected to the natural science lessons (elementary school) and the following specialist lessons (from grade 7).
  • Make chemical content visible as such in science teaching.
  • Identify and use best practice examples for chemical content in the orientation stage.
  • Carry out extensive, cross-country model tests for the implementation of the chemical content in schools, based on the best practice examples.
  • Develop and disseminate exemplary teaching concepts and materials.
  • Qualify teachers specifically for grades 5 and 6 with regard to chemical content and develop suitable advanced training courses.

The initiator and former GDCh board member Professor Dr. Gisela Lück, University of Bielefeld, emphasizes how important it is to implement these recommendations: ?As an industrialized nation, we simply cannot afford to let the school years pass when our students enthusiastically experiment and understand the phenomena. We must not allow adolescents to start studying chemistry and Physics at an age when other topics usually become more important! ?The participants in the closed-door conference assume that the necessary preparatory work will be completed in around three years so that the implementation can then be pushed forward in all federal states. Download the complete brochure The German Chemical Society , with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of new scientific knowledge. The GDCh supports the creation of networks, transdisciplinary and international cooperation and continuous education and training in schools, universities and in the professional environment. It has 28 sections and sections, including the division of Chemical Education with about 1,900 members. Chemistry teacher, high school teacher and chemists from industry and the public sector have joined forces in the division of Chemical Education a competent forum for all issues that affect the chemistry in teaching, teaching, training and further education.

18 Science Forum Chemistry 2017

Anniversary congress with Nobel Prize winners


18/17
May 30, 2017

The predecessor company of the German Chemical Society (GDCh) was founded 150 years ago. On the occasion of this anniversary, the Science Forum Chemistry (WiFo), which will take place from September 10th to 14th in the founding city of Berlin, was supplemented by some program highlights: In addition to the lecture series of the individual GDCh specialist groups, there will also be an Applied Festival Symposium and the Symposium this year ?Experiment Future - Value Thinking in Chemistry? part of the congress. Among the speakers are several Nobel Prize winners and other highly decorated scientists. Around 2000 visitors from Germany and abroad are expected. On September 10th, GDCh President Professor Thisbe K. Lindhorst will open the Science Forum Chemistry 2017 in the Konzerthaus on Gendarmenmarkt. The Federal Minister of Education and Research, Professor Johanna Wanka, will speak a greeting along with other international guests. As part of the opening ceremony, the Primo Levi Prize will be awarded for the first time, which is jointly sponsored by the GDCh and the Italian Chemical Society. The award commemorates the Italian chemist and writer who was deported to Auschwitz as a Jewish resistance fighter and survived. The Nobel Laureate, Professor Roald Hoffmann, Cornell, USA, who will also give the plenary lecture, will be honored. In addition, the GDCh awards three honorary memberships to Professor Egon Fanghänel, TGZ Bitterfeld-Wolfen, Professor Helga Rübsamen-Schaeff, AiCuris Anti-Infective Cures, and Dr. Peter Gölitz, Wiley-VCH. On Monday, September 11th, the Applied Festival Symposium will take place in the Henry Ford Building of the Free University of Berlin. For the symposium, which the GDCh is organizing together with its journal ?Angewandte Chemie?, numerous top-class scientists - including four Nobel Prize winners - were able to be won as speakers. As part of the symposium, the GDCh also awards the Karl Ziegler Prize to Professor Matthias Beller, Leibniz Institute for Catalysis, Rostock. On September 12th and 13th, the specialist group meetings and numerous, partly interdisciplinary symposia will take place on topics such as synthesis and catalysis, life sciences and Chemical Education . In addition to the lecture program, numerous scientists are honored for their achievements. ?Experiment Future - Value Thinking in Chemistry? will follow on September 14th. The symposium in the Spreespeicher, under the patronage of Professor Johanna Wanka, addresses the role of chemistry in solving global problems and in shaping the future. Keynote speeches and innovative discussion formats on key topics such as ?poor and rich? and ?war and peace? are viewed from different perspectives and placed in the social context. Further information on the Science Forum Chemistry 2017 as well as accompanying events such as the ? Student Day ?, the job exchange and the Next Generation satellite conference ?Thinking the unthinkable? are available at www.wifo2017.de. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of scientific knowledge. In 2017 the society celebrates its anniversary: 150 years ago August Wilhelm von Hofmann founded the German Chemical Society, the first predecessor organization of the GDCh in Berlin.

17 Water - the source of all life

conference "Water 2017" in Donaueschingen

17/17
May 9, 2017

From May 22nd to 24th the conference "Water 2017" will take place in the Donauhallen Donaueschingen. The organizer is the Water Chemistry Society, a division of the German Chemical Society (GDCh). In addition to the scientific program, four prizes are awarded: the Willy Hager Prize, the Doctoral Prize, the Prize of the Water Chemistry Society and the division badge of honor. On the first evening of the conference, a public evening lecture also promises to explain the myths and stories about the source of the Danube near Donaueschingen. Water as the source of all life - rarely has the reference to the main element of the water-chemical society been as clear as in the host city of "Wasser 2017". For the first time, the Water Chemistry Society is holding the 83rd annual conference where the Danube's journey to the Black Sea begins: in Donaueschingen. Around 260 visitors are expected. On site, the participants can expect a diverse program all about the wet element. In addition to analytics, the focus of the conference this year is on wastewater, drinking water, nanoparticles and microplastics, water treatment and trace substances. A special focus is on the subject of "Chemistry of Construction Materials and water quality". Construction products in contact with water and leaching of substances are not only a topic at the conferences of the Water Chemical Society, but are now also the focus of regulations. The choice of topics ties in with the activities of the technical committee of the same name, which in March 2017 together with the GDCh Chemistry of Construction Materials division successfully organized a symposium with around 100 participants at the TU Berlin on the current state of knowledge. During the opening event, Dr.-Ing. Maximilian Huber, Technical University of Munich, the Willy Hager Prize endowed with 6,000 euros from the foundation of the same name. In his work he developed a standardized procedure with which decentralized treatment systems for traffic surface runoff can be assessed. Huber's research places process engineering problem solving in the foreground and shows a high level of practical relevance. With the doctoral award - sponsored by the Walter Kölle Foundation - Dr. Allan Philippe, University of Koblenz-Landau, honored. In his work he developed and validated innovative methods for the analysis and characterization of synthetic nanoparticles in complex environmental media. In doing so, he makes an important contribution to improving the analysis of nanoparticles and opens up new perspectives in environmental nanoparticle research. The Prize of the Water Chemical Society - funded by the Walter Kölle Foundation - goes to Dr.-Ing. Aki Sebastian Ruhl, Technische Universität Berlin, for his scientifically excellent research achievements and his commitment to the division. In addition, Dr. Hans-Jürgen Pluta from the Federal Environment Agency Berlin was awarded the badge of honor of the division for his commitment to the board of the Water Chemical Society and his efforts to promote a standardization expert by the UBA. On the eve of "Wasser 2017" (Sunday, May 21), the young scientists meet at the Young Researcher Forum to exchange experiences and network: This now an integral part of the annual conference program was launched as one of the numerous measures to promote young researchers . On May 22nd at 7 p.m. there will be a public evening lecture on the myths and stories about the source of the Danube. Martina Wiemer, tour guide in Donaueschingen, introduces visitors to the history (s) of the source of the Danube with her entertaining lecture. Admission is free for everyone, including those who are interested, who do not come from the group of participants in the conference . "Wasser 2017" will again be accompanied by a specialist exhibition. 14 exhibitors present their companies and their products to the participants of the water chemistry conference. The aim is to promote an intensive dialogue between scientists and companies. The program and further information about the conference at www.gdch.de/wasser2017. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It founded 28 specialist groups and sections, including the Water Chemistry Society, in 1926 as the "division für Water chemistry" in the Association of German Chemists. In 1948 it was re-established as the "division Water chemistry" in the GDCh, since 2000 it has been called "Water Chemistry Society - division in der GDCh". Its more than 950 members are committed to effective protection, sensible use, appropriate treatment and purification as well as the proper examination and assessment of the water. More information at: www.wasserchemische-gesellschaft.de.

16 "Chemical weapons cause terrible suffering"

German chemists commemorate the victims of chemical weapons


16/2017
April 28, 2017

On April 29, the day of remembrance of the victims of chemical weapons, the German Chemical Society (GDCh) is in thought with all those injured and killed. The recent poison gas attack in Syria shows that a lot still needs to be done today to prevent the development and use of chemical weapons. For this reason, the society advocates international ethical guidelines for chemists. "Chemical weapons are still being used, although they bring terrible suffering to those affected," says former GDCh President Dr. Thomas Geelhaar, in whose tenure in 2015 the first use of poison gas was 100 years old. Geelhaar was a member of the German delegation that commemorated the victims of the global use of poison gas at a commemoration event in Ypres, Belgium. ?Not only today, but every day one should be aware of this and campaign for chemical weapons to finally be banned. We chemists in particular, who made the development of such weapons possible in the first place, have to ensure that people are no longer harmed by chemical weapons, ?emphasizes Geelhaar. The GDCh, to which around 31,000 chemists belong, is aware of its responsibility. Those who belong to society are committed to the GDCh's code of conduct . Among other things, it says: ?The GDCh and its members support and promote sustainable and lasting development in society, the economy and the environment. They always act in the awareness of their responsibility towards future generations. They observe the laws and international conventions applicable to their work and its results and effects and oppose the abuse of chemistry, e.g. B. for the production of chemical weapons and addictive substances. ?In addition, the GDCh is also internationally committed to the ban of chemical weapons. Together with other scientists and representatives of specialist chemical societies from more than 20 countries, the company took part in drawing up the ? Hague Ethics Guidelines ?, which were published in September 2015 by the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OPCW). The GDCh board supports the Hague ethical guidelines and recommends them to all actors in chemistry for information, consideration and transfer to employees, students and decision-makers. In addition, the GDCh is also represented in the Advisory Board on Education and Outreach (ABEO) created in 2016, which advises the OPCW on the topics of education, training, awareness-raising and communication. With around 31,000 members, the German Chemical Society is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of new scientific knowledge. The GDCh supports the creation of networks, transdisciplinary and international cooperation and continuous education and training in schools, universities and in the professional environment. The GDCh has 28 specialist groups and sections as well as 60 local associations.

15 news from the "witch's kitchens"

conference of material scientists in the Harz


15/17
April 20, 2017

For the ninth time, on April 29th and 30th, outstanding scientists from chemistry, Physics and Materials Science science will meet near Goslar for the conference ?From the witch's kitchens in Materials Science?. The organizer is the Center of Interface Science, which is located at the Universities of Oldenburg, Osnabrück and Bremen. At the place where, according to legend, witches from all over Germany have been gathering since the 16th century, current research will be presented at the end of April. Traditionally, only women - renowned researchers from all over the world - present at the conference in the Rammelsberg World Heritage Site near Goslar, but scientists are of course welcome as guests. The compatibility of family and research has also been considered: on April 30, the museum mine opens its doors to young researchers, who are competently looked after there. The conference was initiated by the Deputy GDCh President Professor Dr. Katharina Al-Shamery from the University of Oldenburg. The conference by the Equal Opportunities in Chemistry Working Group of the German Chemical Society (GDCh), the German Bunsen Society for Physical Chemistry (DBG) and the Collaborative Research Center 1083 ?Structure and Dynamics of Internal Interfaces? at the University of Marburg. The University Society of Oldenburg also supports the event. After the first day of the conference is dedicated to exchange and networking, the scientific program begins on April 30th with a lecture by Professor Dr. Maki Kawai, Tokyo University and Molecular Science Institute, Okazaki, Japan. The international excellent scientist links in their interdisciplinary research in surface science, Physical Chemistry, condensed matter Physics, Materials Science and nanoscience. It explains how individual molecules can be examined ?at work? with the scanning tunneling microscope. The other lectures will deal with the investigation on an atomic scale of catalysts under reaction conditions, new quantum materials and graphenes. In addition, Dr. Johanna Kowol-Santen from the German Research Foundation can provide important information, for example on funding opportunities, about a research career. Registration and further information about the conference at: www.cis.uni-oldenburg.de/51386.html. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the Working Group on Equal Opportunities in Chemistry (AKCC) with 230 members. The goals of the AKCC include the compatibility of work and family, the breaking of conventional role models and evaluations as well as the advancement of girls.

14 chemists condemn the use of poison weapons

German Chemical Society condemns the use of poison weapons in Syria

14/17
April 10, 2017

The German chemists reacted with horror to the use of poison weapons in Syria. ?The German Chemical Society strongly condemns the use of poison weapons in the Syrian province of Idlib. Chemistry must serve life! ?Emphasized Professor Thisbe K. Lindhorst, President of the GDCh. The attack on the morning of April 4 killed at least 80 people and injured many more. In 1998 the GDCh included a code of conduct in its statutes , which is binding for every member. In it, the members clearly position themselves against the abuse of chemistry, such as the manufacture of chemical weapons. In addition, as a partner of the Organization for the Prohibition of Chemical Weapons (OVCW), the GDCh campaigns for the ban on chemical weapons internationally.

13 Award for excellent University teaching

Christian Ehli receives Ars legendi Faculty Prize for Chemistry


13/17
March 30, 2017

Today the Ars legendi Faculty Prize for excellent University teaching teaching in mathematics and the natural sciences is awarded in Berlin. In the chemistry category, Dr. Christian Ehli from the Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg received the award for excellent University teaching. The prize winner convinced the jury with his methodologically excellent teaching and learning concept, with which he succeeds in anchoring physical and general chemistry in the entire educational path. Further Ars legendi faculty awards go to Dr. Jorge Groß from Otto Friedrich University Bamberg (life sciences), Professor Dr. Sven de Vries from Trier University (mathematics) and a team from Rosenheim University of Applied Sciences, consisting of Professor Dr. Claudia Schäfle, Professor Dr. Silke Stanzel and Professor Dr. Elmar Junker (Physics). Ehli developed a teaching concept with which he is already inspiring students for the MINT area (mathematics, Computer Science, natural sciences, technology). His experimental lecture series "Chemistry on tour" is thematically linked to school lessons. All participants can actively contribute and carry out experiments themselves. Ehli passes on his interactive approach in teacher training courses. The chemist also came up with a few ideas for the introductory phase: Ehli makes it easier for students to get started with a ?bridging course in chemistry?. He organizes his courses interactively and supplements them with various didactic offers such as e-learning or an ?online basic knowledge fitness center?. In addition, it is important to Ehli to convey the fascination and importance of STEM to the general public. Therefore, he was the first to develop an interactive experimental lecture for the whole family. Participants can try out many of the experiments themselves and experience science first hand. At the last Long Night of Science at Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg he thrilled 300 visitors with his lecture. The Ars legendi Prize is awarded in the four categories of life sciences, chemistry, mathematics and Physics and is endowed with ? 5,000 each. The prize was awarded by the Stifterverband für die Deutsche Wissenschaft, the German Chemical Society, the German Mathematicians Association, the German Physical Society and the Association of Biology, Biosciences and Biomedicine in Germany. The prize is intended to make the importance of University teaching teaching for the education of the next generation in mathematics and the natural sciences visible and to create a career-effective incentive to get involved in University teaching teaching and to promote it beyond one's own sphere of activity. Additional information on this year's Ars legendi faculty award and the other award winners can be found in the press release 06/17 of March 1, 2017: www.gdch.de/presse The German Chemical Society (GDCh) is one of the largest chemical science societies with around 31,000 members worldwide. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of scientific knowledge. In 2017 the society celebrates its anniversary: 150 years ago August Wilhelm von Hofmann founded the German Chemical Society, the first predecessor organization of the GDCh in Berlin. Note to the editors: The GDCh President Professor Dr. Thisbe K. Lindhorst or the Deputy GDCh President Professor Dr. Katharina Al-Shamery are available for an interview about the importance of good teaching.

12 Vital Food Chemistry

Working conference of food chemists in Halle / Saale


12/17
23rd March 2017

From March 30th to 31st, 2017, food scientists from research, industry and trade laboratories will meet for a working conference of the Southeast Regional Association of the Food-Chemical Society. At the Martin Luther University in Halle-Wittenberg, they will discuss new findings on the effects of food ingredients on humans. The opening lecture of the conference already addresses a current topic with the improvement of vitamin D supply, which is also of interest to many consumers. Vitamin D is responsible, among other things, for stable bones and strong muscles in the human body and can be formed in the skin under the influence of sunlight. However, almost 60 percent of the German population do not achieve the desired blood concentration and thus do not use the preventive potential of the "sun vitamin". Professor Dr. Gabriele Stangl from the Martin Luther University Halle-Wittenberg shows in her lecture what food-based strategies for improving the vitamin D supply in the population can look like. In Halle, experts from industry, surveillance and private laboratories will get to the bottom of other exciting topics from analysis and consumer protection. The following questions are on the agenda: Are baby bottles made of polyarylsulfones a safe alternative? What is the best way to identify and detect antibiotic residues in meat? And what activities is the federal government doing with regard to food fraud? More information at https://www.gdch.de/netzwerk-struktur/fachstruktur/lebensmittelchemische-gesellschaft/regionalverbaende.html. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the Food Chemistry Society, whose task it is to promote the exchange of ideas in the field of Food Chemistry and its related disciplines and to provide technical suggestions. For this purpose, among other things, conferences of the six regional associations are held. With almost 2,900 members, the Food Chemistry Society is the largest division in the GDCh. It organizes the German Food Chemists' Day every year - this year from September 25th to 27th in Würzburg.

11 Analytical Chemistry at the highest level

Cutting-edge research and award ceremonies at ANAKON

11/17
March 21, 2017

ANAKON 2017 will take place from April 3rd to 6th at the Eberhard Karls University of Tübingen. The most important conference for Analytical Chemistry in German-speaking countries is organized by the Analytical Chemistry division of the German Chemical Society (GDCh) with the scientific support of the Austrian Society of Analytical Chemistry (ASAC) and the Division of Analytical Chemistry of the Swiss Chemical Society (SCG). Around 500 visitors are expected this year. Five prizes will be awarded at the conference . The ANAKON topics cover the entire spectrum of analytical chemistry - from research and development to clinical diagnostics and forensics. Analytics also plays an important role in environmental protection, Pharmacy and food production. The conference focuses on current examination methods and applications, for example in bio-, process- or nanoanalysis. In addition to the scientific program, ANAKON offers young scientists the opportunity to talk to potential employers with a job exchange. Five prizes for outstanding scientists
Professor Dr. Karlheinz Ballschmiter, Ulm University receives the Clemens Winkler Medal for many years of personal commitment to Analytical Chemistry. The retired chemist has given significant international impetus in particular to the organic Trace analysis of Environmental Chemistry and is considered to be the co-founder of the ?Ulm School of Analysis?. The specialist group award goes to Professor Dr. Kevin Pagel, Free University of Berlin. With the award, the Analytical Chemistry division honors the young scientist's outstanding achievements. The Bunsen Kirchhoff Prize of the German Working Group for Analytical Spectroscopy (DAAS ) DAAS to Professor Dr. Jacob T. Shelley, Rensselaer Polytechnic Institute, New York, USA, for his significant contributions to specroscopy. The Gerhard Hesse Prize of the Separation Science working group goes to Professor Dr. Michael Lämmerhofer, Eberhard-Karls-Universität Tübingen, for his important work in the field of analytical separation techniques. As part of the conference , Dr. Ann-Christin Niehoff, University of Münster, was awarded the DAAS Prize for outstanding scientific achievements in the field of chemical micro- and Trace analysis . Further information on the conference can be found at www.gdch.de/anakon2017 The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the Analytical Chemistry division with almost 2,400 members. The division sees its main task in bringing together all scientists and practitioners interested in analytical chemistry in the broadest sense for the purpose of promoting this field of knowledge. The division maintains ten working groups for the various analytical disciplines.

10 Focus on healthy eating

Working conference of food chemists in Nuthetal

10/17
March 14, 2017

On March 21st, food chemists from Berlin, Brandenburg and Mecklenburg-Western Pomerania will meet at the German Institute for Human Nutrition (DIfE) in Nuthetal for their 23rd workshop. The conference of the Northeast Regional Association food Chemical Society is organized. Current topics from analytics and consumer protection are on the agenda. The opening lecture already addresses an everyday problem faced by industrialized nations: while food originally served primarily to meet fluid and nutrient requirements, today hedonistic motives are in the foreground when it comes to nutrition. There is almost no limit to the availability of tasty and high-energy foods. Coupled with the aggressive marketing strategies of the food manufacturers, this leads to obesity and nutrition-related diseases in many people. In particular, sensory characteristics such as smell and taste play a major role in nutrition. Dr. Kathrin Ohla, German Institute for Nutritional Research, explains how such sensory impressions are processed by the brain and how these mechanisms can be used to support a healthy diet. In the further course of the conference , everything revolves around consumer protection. Among other things, it is about mineral oil residues in fresh fruit, tea and spices and about the presentation of new analysis methods that will make food increasingly safer in the future. The challenges that food chemists have to face on this path are also discussed and it is shown how long it can be before standardized methods can be established. More information at https://www.gdch.de/netzwerk-struktur/fachstruktur/lebensmittelchemische-gesellschaft/regionalverbaende.html. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the Food Chemistry Society, whose task it is to promote the exchange of ideas in the field of Food Chemistry and its related disciplines and to provide technical suggestions. For this purpose, among other things, conferences of the six regional associations are held. With almost 2,900 members, the Food Chemistry Society is the largest division in the GDCh. It organizes the German Food Chemists' Day every year - this year from September 25th to 27th in Würzburg.

09 Food chemistry expertise in Münster

Micro- and nano-particles, hemp-containing feed and news about mineral oils


09/17
March 7, 2017

On March 15, food chemists from the North Rhine-Westphalia regional association of the Food Chemistry Society will meet in Münster for their 2017 working conference. In addition, fundamental considerations on the toxicological effects of very small particles such as microplastics in water or nanoparticles are on the program. The varied conference program consists of 14 specialist lectures and numerous poster contributions. Experts present the latest findings on mineral oils in cosmetics and toys and also discuss the toxicological assessment of mineral oil residues. Another exciting topic is whether psychoactive substances pass into cow's milk when the animals are fed with hemp-containing feed. Experts from investigation offices and research, together with industry representatives, examine this question from an analytical, toxicological and, in particular, legal point of view. Further topics are new trace substances in drinking water and current analysis methods, without which no trace would be possible. The development of new analytical techniques is one of the core competencies of state-certified food chemists. It can also be used to answer nutritional-physiological questions. For example, there is now a urine examination technique for assessing the health of apple consumption. Without the expertise of food chemists, this would be just as impossible as the legal dispute with food fraud. For this reason, the conference also discuss how training with a state qualification must be designed in the future in order to meet the constantly changing requirements. More information at https://www.gdch.de/netzwerk-struktur/fachstruktur/lebensmittelchemische-gesellschaft/regionalverbaende.html. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the Food Chemistry Society, whose task it is to promote the exchange of ideas in the field of Food Chemistry and its related disciplines and to provide technical suggestions. For this purpose, among other things, conferences of the six regional associations are held. With almost 2,900 members, the Food Chemistry Society is the largest division in the GDCh. It organizes the German Food Chemists' Day every year - this year from September 25th to 27th in Würzburg.

08 Criss-cross through the chemistry universe

New non-fiction book shows the role of chemistry in modern society

08/17
March 7, 2017

On the occasion of its anniversary, the German Chemical Society (GDCh) has published a book that illuminates the achievements and possibilities of chemistry in all of its facets in an entertaining way. ?Infinite expanses. Criss-cross through the chemistry universe ?is the title of the book published by Wiley-VCH. Numerous renowned authors take the reader on an understandable and varied journey through the world of chemistry. The editors of the book are the GDCh President Thisbe K. Lindhorst, the former GDCh President Hans-Jürgen Quadbeck-Seeger and the GDCh itself. In twelve chapters, recognized experts deal with achievements, applications and innovations in chemistry as well as challenges and new ones Thoughts. Which renewable raw materials are there and how can carbon dioxide or hydrogen be used for energy production in the future? To what extent can genetic research help develop a bacterial immune system? What alternatives to antibiotics are conceivable? How can we prevent the climate catastrophe? What opportunities does Nuclear Chemistry offer? Which environmentally friendly materials and solutions for information storage are chemists working on around the world? How can recycling technologies be improved? The book is aimed at both scientific laypeople and experts and, in a colorful kaleidoscope, provides many approaches to get to know and understand better the importance of chemistry for our world. Thisbe K. Lindhorst, Hans-Jürgen Quadbeck- Seeger and GDCh (eds.) Infinite widths - criss-cross through the chemistry universe, 1st edition 2017 ISBN: 978-3-527-34203-7 / Wiley-VCH, Weinheim, 29.90 ? (also available as an e-book) The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of scientific knowledge. In 2017 the society celebrates its anniversary: 150 years ago August Wilhelm von Hofmann founded the German Chemical Society, the first predecessor organization of the GDCh in Berlin.

07 A forum for young scientists

19th spring symposium of the JungChemikerForum with awarding of the Carl-Roth-Förderpreis


07/2017
2nd March 2017

The 19th spring symposium of the JungChemikerForum (JCF) of the German Chemical Society (GDCh) will take place in Mainz from March 29th to April 1st. Around 320 young scientists come together at Johannes Gutenberg University to present their research and exchange ideas on an interdisciplinary basis. In addition to lectures, poster sessions and workshops, the top-class scientific program also offers a diverse framework program. In addition, the Carl Roth Award will be given to Dr. Sven Herrmann awarded. The JCF spring symposium is one of the largest conferences in Europe by and for young scientists and is organized annually by changing regional young chemists forums of the GDCh. In 2017, when the GDCh looks back on 150 years of history and the JungChemikerForum celebrates its twentieth anniversary, the JCF Mainz-Wiesbaden took over the organization of the conference and created a varied program. In addition to lectures by renowned scientists, the JCF Spring Symposium also features young research group leaders and young scientists. They have the opportunity to present their research in lectures. In 2017, parallel sessions will be held for the first time in order to give as many young scientists as possible the opportunity to present their work. In addition, poster sessions offer students and doctoral candidates from all areas of chemistry and related natural sciences the opportunity for professional exchange. Individual posters are announced in three-minute poster presentations, and poster and lecture award winners are honored - after evaluation by the participants. For the anniversary year, the JungchemikerForum Mainz-Wiesbaden is also holding numerous workshops, exciting excursions and a varied evening program. Another highlight will be the Carl Roth Award on March 31st. The GDCh awards the award, endowed with 5000 euros, to young chemists who develop resource-conserving synthetic routes or who use chemicals innovatively. The prize is financed by Carl Roth GmbH & Co. KG, which will also contribute a further 3,000 euros in the form of a voucher. This year, the coveted Dr. Sven Herrmann for his work at Ulm University on the synthesis and properties of polyoxometalate-based ionic liquids. The laureate developed new application-related concepts and was able to make the materials examined by him accessible for a new type of corrosion protection, among other things. In addition, based on his research, he developed an innovative filter material for water treatment, for which a patent has already been applied for. Further information can be found at www.jcf-fruehjahrssymposium.de. With around 31,000 members, the German Chemical Society is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of new scientific knowledge. The GDCh supports the creation of networks, transdisciplinary and international cooperation and continuous education and training in schools, universities and in the professional environment. The GDCh has 28 specialist groups and sections as well as 60 local associations and young chemist forums at 54 university locations. The JCF forms a nationwide platform for over 10,000 young members of the GDCh.

06 Ars legendi faculty award for mathematics and natural sciences 2017 - winners have been announced

06/17
March 1, 2017

This year, the Ars legendi faculty award for excellent University teaching teaching in mathematics and natural sciences goes to Professor Dr. Jorge Groß from Otto Friedrich University Bamberg (life sciences), Dr. Christian Ehli from the Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg (chemistry), Professor Dr. Sven de Vries from the University of Trier (mathematics) and jointly with Professor Claudia Schäfle, Professor Silke Stanzel and Professor Elmar Junker from the University of Rosenheim (Physics). The Ars legendi Faculty Prize in Mathematics and Natural Sciences is awarded to scientists who distinguish themselves through outstanding, innovative and exemplary performance in teaching, advice and support. The prize is awarded by the Stifterverband für die Deutsche Wissenschaft, the German Mathematicians Association, the German Physical Society, the German Chemical Society and the Association of Biology, Biosciences and Biomedicine in Germany. The award has been given since 2014 in the biosciences, chemistry, mathematics and Physics categories and is endowed with 5,000 euros each. Interested parties are cordially invited to the ceremonial awarding of the Ars legendi Faculty Prize Mathematics and Natural Sciences 2017, which will take place on March 30, 2017 at 5:00 p.m. in the Senate Hall of the Humboldt University in Berlin. Please register by March 22, 2017 at berlin@vbio.de. The winners were selected by an eleven-person jury made up of representatives from the field, representatives from university didactics and students. She awarded the 2017 Ars legendi Faculty Prize for Mathematics and Natural Sciences to the following university professors: In the subject of biosciences: Professor Dr. Jorge Groß teaches science didactics at the Otto Friedrich University in Bamberg. At a university without a natural science department, it makes the training of biology teachers possible in the first place. He focuses on the use of digital tools and has, among other things, set up the GreenLab, in which students act as "didactic double-deckers" and alternately jump into the role of teacher and learner and acquire specialist and methodological skills. The jury recognizes his extremely diverse methodological repertoire and the numerous offers with which Prof. Groß also reaches many target groups outside the university. One app he created for interactive species identification alone has been downloaded more than 55,000 times and is in use at many universities across Germany. In chemistry: As Academic Councilor for Physical Chemistry, Dr. Christian Ehli from the Friedrich-Alexander-Universität Erlangen-Nürnberg on anchoring physical and general chemistry in the entire educational path. To this end, he maintains close contact with schools in order to facilitate the transition between school and university. He regularly conducts experimental lectures in schools and offers bridging courses for the introductory phase. Students learn interactively by setting up e-learning elements during lectures and tutorials or experiment freely. Teachers in schools benefit from his advanced training courses in chemistry. He also convinced the jury with his pragmatic approaches and the ambitious ?full support guarantee? for students. In mathematics: Professor Dr. Sven de Vries from the University of Trier inspires students with his dialogic teaching style, including in particular teaching and minor students for mathematics. With his diverse commitment, he not only reaches students, but also addresses schoolchildren, teachers and the general public. The jury was particularly impressed by his very well thought-out, comprehensive teaching concept for teacher training. For example, he introduced the successful ?Mathematics and Art? seminar, the approach of which has meanwhile been adopted for other events. In Physics: Professor Dr. Claudia Schäfle, Professor Dr. Silke Stanzel and Professor Dr. Elmar Junker teach Physics at the Rosenheim University of Applied Sciences. They offer basic as well as advanced courses in several very different courses of study. The focus is on ?Just in Time Teaching? (JiTT), in which the learning status of the students is ascertained in small steps, online-based in order to counter comprehension problems of students by flexibly adapting the immediately following course. In addition, the instrument of ?peer instruction? is used, with which the students explain complex issues to each other, which they can better acquire and practice the professional discussion culture. In addition to the exemplary collegial cooperation of the award winners, the jury was particularly impressed by the fact that the motivation of the students to prepare for events could be impressively increased. The award ceremony for the 2017 Ars legendi Faculty Prize for Mathematics and Natural Sciences will take place on March 30, 2017 at 5:00 p.m. in the Senate Hall of the Humboldt University in Berlin. The lecture entitled ?From the visual process of microalgae to the light-controlled mouse - the development of optogenetics? will be held by Professor Dr. Peter Hegemann, Humboldt University Berlin. We ask that you register by March 22, 2017 at berlin@vbio.de. Press contact VBIO:
Dr. Kerstin Elbing, Tel .: (030) 27891916, E-Mail: elbing@vbio.de Press contact Stifterverband:
Peggy Groß, phone: (030) 982 322-530, email: peggy.gross@stifterverband.de

05 Active science and research transfer

Chemistry lecturer conference with award ceremonies in Marburg

05/17
February 28, 2017

The 2017 Chemistry Lecturer Conference will take place from March 13 to 15 at the Philipps University of Marburg. University professors from the Faculties of Chemistry from Germany and neighboring countries attend the conference of the Association of German University Professors of Chemistry (ADUC) of the German Chemical Society (GDCh). On site, they find out about news in research and teaching and exchange ideas on an international level. The Carl Duisberg Memorial Prize and the Horst Pracejus Prize as well as the ADUC Prizes will also be awarded during the conference . The topics of the conference include current knowledge and research results from all fields of chemistry as well as didactic developments and new approaches to conveying complex issues in teaching. At the annual conference , outstanding chemists are awarded GDCh prizes. The Carl Duisberg Memorial Prize goes to Professor Dr. Shigeyoshi Inoue, Technical University of Munich. The award, which is endowed with 7,500 euros, supports young academics in chemistry. The 36-year-old chemist convinced the selection committee with the excellent quality of his publications and his considerable research. In this, Inoue concentrates on low-valent main group element compounds, in particular metals and semimetals of groups 13, 14 and 15, their basic reactivities and special applications in synthesis. His aim is to find novel applications for these compounds with their unusual structures and unique electronic properties. The Horst Pracejus Prize is awarded to Professor Dr. Thorsten Bach, Technical University of Munich, awarded. The GDCh is honoring his internationally visible pioneering work on photoinduced asymmetric catalysis, which has a decisive influence on organic catalysis and stereoselective synthesis. In his research, Bach focuses on the development of new methods, including the use of photochemical processes, the research and application of new catalytic reactions and the total synthesis of complex natural substances. This year, the ADUC three young scientists from different fields of chemistry for establishing an independent research area: The winners are Dr. Rubén Darío Costa Riquelme, Friedrich-Alexander-University Erlangen-Nürnberg, Dr. Robert Langer, Philipps University of Marburg, and Dr. Bill Morandi, Max Planck Institute for Coal Research in Mülheim ad Ruhr. Further information can be found at www.gdch.de/cdt2017. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 28 specialist groups and sections and awards numerous prizes for special achievements in chemical research. Up to three post-doctoral candidates from all areas of chemistry are honored annually for particularly original and scientifically significant publications by the traditional Association of German University Professors of Chemistry (ADUC) , which is part of the GDCh.

Professor Dr. Shigeyoshi Inoue
Professor Dr. Thorsten Bach

04 How honest is our food?

Working conference of food chemists in Hamburg with a public evening lecture


04/17
February 21, 2017

Current topics from analytics and consumer protection are on the program of the 2017 symposium of the North Regional Association of the Food Chemical Society. On February 27 and 28, scientists, officials and representatives from the (food) industry will meet at the University of Hamburg to exchange ideas and provide technical suggestions. To begin with, there will be a public panel discussion on the subject of ?How honest is our food??. Controversial discussions as well as clear answers are expected from the members of the podium. In addition to Professor Dr. Michael Bockisch, managing director of Bockisch Consult, Christiane Huxdorff, campaigner at Greenpeace eV, Sebastian Lege, product developer and TV expert, Silke Schwartau, head of the nutrition department of the Hamburg consumer center, and Birgit Stöver, member of the Hamburg citizenship, try to shed light on the darkness bring. All interested parties are cordially invited to the panel discussion on February 27 at 6:00 p.m. in the west building of the University of Hamburg, lecture hall ESA 1 W (room 221), Edmund-Siemers-Allee 1. Admission is free. In the further course of the conference , the food chemists, who are the ultimate experts in all questions relating to the quality and composition of food, will get to the bottom of current consumer issues. For example, one lecture is devoted to so-called superfoods and sheds light on the tension between science and esotericism. The role of whistleblowers is also considered. Are they an opportunity or a threat to industry and official surveillance? These and other questions about food analysis and consumer protection will be the subject of lively discussions at the conference. More information at

https://www.gdch.de/netzwerk-struktur/fachstruktur/lebensmittelchemische-gesellschaft/regionalverbaende.html . The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the Food Chemistry Society, whose task it is to promote the exchange of ideas in the field of Food Chemistry and its related disciplines and to provide technical suggestions. For this purpose, among other things, conferences of the six regional associations are held. With almost 2,900 members, the Food Chemistry Society is the largest division in the GDCh. It organizes the German Food Chemists' Day every year - this year from September 25th to 27th in Würzburg.

03 German and Israeli chemists sign cooperation agreement

The German Chemical Society (GDCh) and the Israel Chemical Society (ICS) signed a cooperation agreement on the occasion of the opening of the 82nd annual conference of the Israel Chemical Society on February 13th in Tel Aviv. In it, the companies agree on close scientific cooperation in the field of chemistry.

03/17
February 13, 2017

This includes the organization of joint scientific events as well as mutual research stays of young scientists in the host country. In addition, members of both societies can attend conferences and other events of the partner society at reduced membership fees. The agreement was signed by the President of the German Chemical Society, Professor Thisbe K. Lindhorst and the President of the Israel Chemical Society, Professor Ehud Keinan. In the presence of the German ambassador to Israel, Dr. Clemens von Goetze, both emphasized the long-standing trusting relationships between their scientific societies in their welcoming speeches. At the invitation of the Israel Chemical Society, a delegation of German scientists, led by the German Chemical Society part in the conference of the Israel Chemical Society. Following the two-day conference, she will also attend the symposium of the GDCh journal Angewandte Chemie, which will also be held in Tel Aviv on February 15. At this 6th "Applied Symposium" under the title "Chemistry for our Future", five renowned scientists from Germany and Israel will present their research results, including Prof. Annette Beck-Sickinger (University of Leipzig on drug development) and Prof. David Milstein (Weizmann Institute, Rehovot on sustainable catalysis). The Angewandte Symposium following the annual conference is jointly organized by the Israel Chemical Society, the German Chemical Society and the journals "Angewandte Chemie" and "Israel Journal of Chemistry" published by Wiley-VCh. Further information and the complete program at http://angewandte.org/symposium The German Chemical Society , with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of new scientific knowledge. The GDCh supports the creation of networks, transdisciplinary and international cooperation and continuous education and training in schools, universities and in the professional environment. The GDCh has 28 specialist groups and sections as well as 60 local associations. ?Angewandte Chemie? belongs to the German Chemical Society (GDCh), is published by Wiley-VCH and is a leading global journal for the entire field of chemistry and related areas.

02 Focus on innovative drugs

conference ?Frontiers in Medicinal Chemistry? with awarding of the Klaus Grohe Prize in Bern

02/17
January 31, 2017

The international conference ?Frontiers in Medicinal Chemistry? will take place from February 12 to 15 at the University of Bern. Around 150 visitors are expected to attend the event, which is organized by the Medicinal Chemistry division of the German Chemical Society (GDCh) together with the Swiss Chemical Society (SCS) and the German Pharmaceutical Society (DPhG). As part of the conference , two young scientists will also be awarded the Klaus Grohe Prize for Medicinal Chemistry . Medical chemists deal with biologically active substances in an interdisciplinary manner and investigate how their mechanisms of action work. They use their scientific findings to find new, effective drugs. What progress has been made in medicinal chemistry in the recent past and what research is about to make a breakthrough is the topic of the annual conference "Frontiers in Medicinal Chemistry". Two young scientists receive the Klaus Grohe Prize for Medicinal Chemistry in Bern. The award is presented by the Klaus Grohe Foundation for Medicinal Chemistry, which is part of the German Chemical Society (GDCh). Prize winners are Dr. Tristan Gollnest, who did his doctorate at the University of Hamburg, and Dr. Cedric L. Hugelshofer, who did his doctorate at the Ludwig Maximilian University in Munich. After the award ceremony, both award winners will report on their research. The innovation prize in medical / pharmaceutical chemistry, endowed with 5000 euros, will also be awarded during the conference . The joint award of the GDCh division Medicinal Chemistry and division for Pharmaceutical / Medicinal Chemistry the German Pharmaceutical Company receives this year Professor Dr. Anna KH Hirsch, University of Groningen, for her groundbreaking research on structure-based drug design and for the discovery of small-molecule inhibitors. The doctoral prize in the field of medical / pharmaceutical chemistry has been awarded annually since 2013 by the GDCh division for Medicinal Chemistry to three scientists who each receive 500 euros as prize money. In 2017 these are Dr. Patrick Mäder, University of Marburg, Dr. Roman Sommer, University of Konstanz, and Dr. Norbert Furtmann, University of Bonn. They too will present their work in lectures. Further information can be found at: www.gdch.de/medchem2017. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It has 28 specialist groups and sections, including the Medicinal Chemistry division . It has existed since 1971 and has over 800 members. These work in university institutes, other research institutions and in the pharmaceutical industry. They are mainly chemists and pharmacists, but also computer scientists, process engineers and others. The division aims to bridge the gap between chemistry on the one hand and Biology, Medicine and Pharmacy on the other.

Verleihung des Klaus-Grohe-Preises für medizinische Chemie (v.l.n.r.): Prof. Dr. Daniel Rauh, TU Dortmund, Barbara Köhler, GDCh-Geschäftsstelle, das Stifter-Ehepaar Grohe, Dr. Tristan Gollnest, Prof. Dr. Christa Müller, Uni Bonn, und Dr. Cedric Hugelshofer (Foto: Isabelle Schönholzer, Bern)

01 A threatened habitat under the microscope

26th Frankfurt Special Colloquium deals with seas and oceans from a scientific perspective


01/17
17th January 2017

?Seas and oceans - valued, used and threatened? is the title of the 26th Frankfurt Special Colloquium, which will take place on January 26, 2017 in Frankfurt am Main. Four scientists will present the dangers that threaten our seas and how they can be countered. Intact seas are an important basis for human existence. However, since this habitat is now increasingly threatened by exploitation and pollution, the Federal Ministry of Education and Research announced the Science Year ?Seas and Oceans? in 2016/2017. For this reason, the Frankfurt Special Colloquium this year is also dedicated to the topic of "Seas and Oceans". In addition to studies on microplastics in the sea, the focus is on how chemical pollutants can be monitored on the high seas, what new pollutants occur in fish and how solar fuels and drinking water can be obtained from seawater. The Frankfurt Special Colloquium is organized annually by DECHEMA, DBG, DVS, GDCh, VDI-BV Frankfurt, the Frankfurt Physical Society and the Senckenberg Society for Nature Research. As it was organized this year by the German Chemical Society (GDCh), chemical aspects in particular play an important role in the event. At the same time, the colloquium marks the beginning of various events of the GDCh anniversary year. The 26th Frankfurt Special Colloquium will take place on January 26, 2017 from 2 to 6 p.m. in the DECHEMA-Haus, Theodor-Heuss-Allee 25, Frankfurt am Main. All interested parties are cordially invited. Admission is free. Complete program and registration at: http://dechema.de/Kolloquium_Meere+und+Ozeane_2017.html. The German Chemical Society (GDCh), with around 31,000 members, is one of the largest chemical science societies in the world. It promotes scientific work, research and teaching as well as the exchange and dissemination of scientific knowledge. In 2016 the society celebrates its anniversary: 150 years ago August Wilhelm von Hofmann founded the German Chemical Society, the first predecessor organization of the GDCh in Berlin.

Contact

Dr. Karin J. Schmitz
Head of GDCh-
public relations
pr@gdch.de
Tel. 069 / 7917-493

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